marc garrett
Since the beginning
Works in London United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

PORTFOLIO (4)
BIO
Marc Garrett is co-director and co-founder, with artist Ruth Catlow of the Internet arts collectives and communities – Furtherfield.org, Furthernoise.org, Netbehaviour.org, also co-founder and co-curator/director of the gallery space formerly known as 'HTTP Gallery' now called the Furtherfield Gallery in London (Finsbury Park), UK. Co-curating various contemporary Media Arts exhibitions, projects nationally and internationally. Co-editor of 'Artists Re:Thinking Games' with Ruth Catlow and Corrado Morgana 2010. Hosted Furtherfield's critically acclaimed weekly broadcast on UK's Resonance FM Radio, a series of hour long live interviews with people working at the edge of contemporary practices in art, technology & social change. Currently doing an Art history Phd at the University of London, Birkbeck College.

Net artist, media artist, curator, writer, street artist, activist, educationalist and musician. Emerging in the late 80′s from the streets exploring creativity via agit-art tactics. Using unofficial, experimental platforms such as the streets, pirate radio such as the locally popular ‘Savage Yet Tender’ alternative broadcasting 1980′s group, net broadcasts, BBS systems, performance, intervention, events, pamphlets, warehouses and gallery spaces. In the early nineties, was co-sysop (systems operator) with Heath Bunting on Cybercafe BBS with Irational.org.

Our mission is to co-create extraordinary art that connects with contemporary audiences providing innovative, engaging and inclusive digital and physical spaces for appreciating and participating in practices in art, technology and social change. As well as finding alternative ways around already dominating hegemonies, thus claiming for ourselves and our peer networks a culturally aware and critical dialogue beyond traditional hierarchical behaviours. Influenced by situationist theory, fluxus, free and open source culture, and processes of self-education and peer learning, in an art, activist and community context.
Discussions (1673) Opportunities (12) Events (175) Jobs (2)
DISCUSSION

Syndrome 3.0: The Post-Human Gospel


Syndrome 3.0: The Post-Human Gospel

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Niki Russell reviews Syndrome 3.0: The Post-Human Gospel at 24 Kitchen Street - a night of performances, by artists whose entangled relation to technology seeks to posit new forms of identity and spirituality.

http://furtherfield.org/features/reviews/syndrome-30-post-human-gospel

To many, technology and spirituality would seem antithetical. Contemporary technology is intertwined with modern science, whereas, spirituality is equally enmeshed within both religion and faith. The Post-Human Gospel self-consciously accepts this awkwardness, and manoeuvres these two uneasy bedfellows together. Offering up a night of performances, by artists whose entangled relation to technology seeks to posit new forms of identity and spirituality.

This is the latest in a series of events, collectively entitled Syndrome, seeking to explore the relationship between technology and affect in performance. The Post-Human Gospel marks the start of the third phase of this activity, collaboratively programmed by Mercy and The Hive Collective. If 3.0 is heading into the realm of spirituality, then earlier phases have played with both language and control – whether the constraints enforced on the body in virtual space, role-playing authority within the State Free State of a.P.A.t.T island, or a ‘room as instrument’ where you can physically manipulate sound and light. Across these events, those involved ask how we might interact or play with this technology, and in turn, how this experience might then act upon on us – our feelings and emotions?


DISCUSSION

Visions of a techno-leviathan: The politics of the Bitcoin blockchain


Visions of a techno-leviathan: The politics of the Bitcoin blockchain.

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http://furtherfield.org/features/articles/visions-techno-leviathan-politics-bitcoin-blockchain

Brett Scott examines the politics of the Bitcoin Blockchain and whether there will be a place for equality and democracy, as the power systems already in place begin to reshape new digital economies according to their own intentions.

“What has been introduced to the world is a method to create decentralised peer-validated time-stamped ledgers. That is a fancy way of saying it is a method for bypassing the use of centralised officials in recording stuff. Such officials are pervasive in society, from a bank that records electronic transactions between me and my landlord, to patent officers that record the date of new innovations, to parliamentary registers noting the passing of new legislative acts.”

Brett Scott is the author of The Heretic's Guide to Global Finance: Hacking the Future of Money (Pluto Press: 2013). And writes for various publications, including The Guardian, Wired Mag and New Scientist, and commentate on issues like financial reform, cryptocurrency and peer-to-peer systems. he is also involved in projects related to alternative finance, financial activism, and economic justice, such as Action Aid, World Development Movement, Open Oil, The Finance Innovation Lab, and MoveYourMoney UK.

DISCUSSION

Review of Nathaniel Stern’s Interactive Art and Embodiment: The Implicit Body As Performance


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Robert Jackson reviews Nathaniel Stern's Interactive Art and Embodiment: The Implicit Body as Performance (2013): a critical framework that argues for the importance of embodiment in digital interactive art together with a constitutive philosophy of relationality, movement, materiality and process.

We’d be interested to know your own views regarding the content of this review by Robert Jackson and his critique on Nathaniel Stern’s publication. If you wish to add comments you are very welcome to chat here or (however, please leave a copy of your thoughts under the actual review/article on the site or on netbehaviour.org). I’m sharing this with those who I think may be interested in the subject, the ideas, the artists and the social contexts and the culture…

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/reviews/performance-infrastructure-review-interactive-art-and-embodiment-implicit-body-perf

DISCUSSION

(Conceptual) Art, Cryptocurrency and Beyond.


(Conceptual) Art, Cryptocurrency and Beyond.

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Rob Myers brings together the history of conceptual art and the future of Bitcoin-style blockchain technology for what would have been a panel presentation at The White Building for V&A Digital Futures: Money No Object.

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/articles/conceptual-art-cryptocurrency-and-beyond

DISCUSSION

Data as Culture


Data as Culture

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Review/article by Daniel Rourke

Rourke wallows in curator Shiri Shalmy's ongoing project Data as Culture, examining works by Paolo Cirio and James Bridle that deal explicitly with the concatenation of data. What happens when society is governed by a regime of data about data, increasingly divorced from the symbolic?

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/reviews/data-culture