Nick Hallett
Since 2005
Works in New York, New York United States of America

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BIO
Music/Audiovisual/Curator

Oneohtrix Point Never and Nate Boyce's Performance at MoMA PopRally


Photos by Kristy Leibowitz/elkstudios

This past weekend, MoMA presented a collaboration between electronic musician Daniel Lopatin—who records under the moniker Oneohtrix Point Never—and video artist Nate Boyce, as part of its PopRally series of art parties. While not an overly serious gathering, Boyce and Lopatin delivered an hour of strobing, structuralist-minded imagery over relentless digital throbbing. Each of the work’s sections was based upon a specific object in the MoMA’s sculpture collection and the overarching title, Reliquary House, suggested a congratulatory pat on the back for the museum. PopRally events are more often than not thematically connected to what’s concurrently on MoMA’s walls, while in this case the institution’s history was the tie-in.

The video screen displayed 3-D renderings of modernist forms by Isamo Noguchi, David Smith, Jacob Epstein, and Anthony Caro, which gyrated in “impossible” landscapes evoking the Panopticon look of the music video to Nine Inch Nail’s “Down In It.” To clarify their intention, Lopatin began each movement with details of the image being projected—dates, dimensions, curatorial texts—dictated by robotic voices a la Siri and the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Within the foreboding visual environment, these came off as provocations of a sort, which gave way to beds of digital glitches and rollicking bass oscillations, positing a bleak underbelly to the neutrality of the subject material. Boyce and Lopatin, who often communicate a sense of humor about the austerity of contemporary tools and approaches in their work, perplexed the droll audience, who perhaps expected Lopatin to perform the angelic synthesizer music indicative of his latest record, Replica. Boyce and Lopatin stood ground side-by-side, facing their laptops, but more often were caught gazing up at the video screen.

Lopatin’s other recent art project, a zine ...

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EVENT

ELECTION 2004 DOUBLE FEATURE: HALF OF THE PEOPLE and C RED BLUE J


Dates:
Mon Oct 13, 2008 00:00 - Fri Oct 03, 2008

ELECTION 2004 DOUBLE FEATURE
an evening of politics and art from 2004 to put this year's antics in context
8pm (one screening)

From the proceeds of the screening, a donation will be made in Sarah Palin's name to the Planned Parenthood MInnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota Action Fund

http://www.plannedparenthoodadvocate.org/

The typically blue state of Minnesota has been classified as a toss-up in the upcoming election. The Action Fund is doing grassroots organizing to educate Midwestern voters about the McCain/Palin ticket's anti-choice policies, which could directly affect which way it swings on November 4. Nearly one million bucks has been raised for Planned Parenthood via this popular (and truly unofficial) campaign and we think helping out the Minnesotans who are doing this important work is especially necessary to make sure the state upholds its liberal roots. Plus Sarah Palin will get a card in the mail notifying her of the donation.

HALF OF THE PEOPLE ARE STONED AND THE OTHER HALF ARE WAITING FOR THE NEXT ELECTION
*A line written by Paul Simon for Leonard Bernstein's Mass (1971).

A screening of activism-oriented video, performance documentation, and new media from 2004

Curated by Nick Hallett

As the race to the White House consumes our nation's collective attention, let's take a look back to the 2004 election and celebrate the unique spirit of that year when the art world in New York and across the country took up the mantle of this country's great activist tradition.

Many artists who make political work do so regardless of their calendars, but the high stakes of '04 yielded contexts for agit-prop art and performance unseen since the late 1960s. Initiatives like Downtown for Democracy and the Imagine Festival united New York's artist communities against the Bush administration as the RNC rolled into town. The Internet matured as a critical venue for countercultural action in attempts to revise standard models of protest. Audiences and critics, eager to experience their own distaste for the current state of affairs distilled into forms of art and entertainment, gave greater voice to explicitly political work. Guerrilla theater filled the streets at every opportunity for nose-thumbing, resulting in countless arrests, while cellphone cameras rolled to create a new kind of folk-documentary. Culture and politics collided in vivid and memorable fashion.

This collection of work from four years ago offers itself as something of a time capsule, although not enough time has passed for true nostalgia to set in. The 2008 election is playing itself out very differently than its predecessor. Without a concrete enemy to inspire rage, Americans--artists included--seem to be placing their faith in the system and its candidates, while pure activism remains conveniently stifled. But how different is our country's situation? Aren't we even worse off than four years ago? Is our current race any less of a pageant?

ASCII Bush, Yoshi Sodeoka, 2-channel video installation, 2004
I Need a Contingency Plan, Taylor Mac, video document of Live Patriot Acts: Patriots Gone Wiiild!, 2004
Campaign Spots, Guy Richards Smit/John Pilson/Lou Fernandez, video, 2004
March for Women's Lives, April 25 2004, Pink Bloque/Blithe Riley/Dara Greenwald, video, 2004
Keanu Reeves for President, Laura Parnes, video, 2004
Folk Music and Documentary, Seth Price, video, 2004
2304 Is a Beer Drinking Year, Jen Liu, video, 2004
KerryRocks.net, Cory Arcangel/Jonah Peretti, video download, 2004
The President of the United States, James Tigger! Ferguson, from Live Patriot Acts: Patriots Gone Wiiild!, 2004
Arnold's Ass, Laura Parnes, video, 2004
Big Screen Version, Aaron Valdez, video, 2004
Play the Game, Imaginary Company/Peter Glantz/Ben Jones, television advertisement, 2004
Fuck the Vote, Carbon Defense League, video, 2004
See the Elephant! (excerpt), Ryan Junell, multi-channel installation mixed to video, 2004
(includes document of musical work Ringing for Healing by Pauline Oliveros)
Jamming: By the Waters of Babylon (excerpt), Saul Levine, 16mm transferred to video, 2004
Listen (excerpt), Aldo Tambellini, video, 2004-05
White Man, Suicide, video document of live performance shot by Punkcast/Joly MacFie, 2004
Vote for Bush or Burn in Hell, Laura Parnes, video, 2004
TXTMob, Institute for Applied Autonomy, video, 2004
A World With No Bush, Julie Atlas Muz, from Live Patriot Acts: Patriots Gone Wiiild!, 2004
Up Came Oil!, The Yes Men/Patrick Lichty, computer animation and video, 2004
Libber, Wynne Greenwood, video/performance, 2004

Total Running Time: 80 mins

followed by C RED BLUE J
directed by Chris Sollars

C RED BLUE J is an experimental documentary feature that illustrates the complications of division during the 2004 Presidential election as it is manifested in one family. Director Chris Sollars, an artist living and working in San Francisco sets out to try and bridge the political gaps in his own family between a younger sister who works for the Bush Administration, a Born Again Christian father, and Lesbian mother. C RED BLUE J is pieced together through an archive of family super-8 films, photos, interviews, and art videos. The story personalizes the political division of the 2004 Presidential campaign as the Gay Marriage Vote is tactically used to split the Nation’s vote and the director’s family. C RED BLUE J puts a face to the name of the opposition and reconstructs the lack of communication within a family and the nation.

Featuring music by John Dwyer (Coachwhips), Hisham Bharoocha (Soft Circle), and Fuckwolf

"Christopher Sollars wants to figure out why his family is so politically divided—he’s an arty San Francisco liberal and his mom’s a lesbian, while his dad’s a born-again Christian and his sister is a Dubya cheerleader working for the Department of Energy. Using home movies, photos, interviews with his family, old political ads, and footage from the 2004 election, Sollars assembles a collage film that attempts to locate connections between American political scandals and his family’s dysfunction. (His parents’ divorce, for instance, is discussed amid footage of Iran-Contra.) Mondale ads didn’t accomplish anything in 1984; what makes Sollars think they’ll work any better now?" (Mark Athitakis)

Nick Hallett is a musician and curator interested in the intersection of music and multimedia. He has programmed at The Kitchen, Netmage, Aurora Picture Show, All Tomorrow's Parties, Artists's Television Access, Pacific Film Archive, Ocularis, Monkey Town, Issue Project Room, New York Underground Film Festival, Chicago Filmmakers, Chicago Underground Film Festival, Mass Art Film Society, and Secret Project Robot among others. His music series, Darmstadt, hosted with Zach Layton, was included in the New York Times's "Best of New Music 2007." He originated the band Plantains, which from 2000 to 2003 performed as a live multimedia outfit, incorporating electronic music and video. Nick enjoys singing music of several varieties, namely experimental contemporary art song of his and other's doing, and has appeared recently at The Kitchen and Joe's Pub.

ELECTION 2004 DOUBLE FEATURE
Monday, October 13 at 8pm
Monkey Town
58 N 3rd St.
Brooklyn, New York 11211
tickets $8 to $20 sliding scale benefit for Planned Parenthood Action Fund of Minnesota and the Dakotas
http://www.monkeytownhq.com
L to Bedford


EVENT

DARMSTADT presents RAY SWEETEN at GALAPAGOS


Dates:
Wed Sep 24, 2008 00:00 - Mon Sep 15, 2008

For its concert premiere at Galapagos Art Space’s new DUMBO location, Darmstadt “Classics of the Avant Garde” concert series is pleased to present an evening of visual music by composer and video artist, Ray Sweeten

September 24, 2008
8:00 pm
Galapagos Art Space
16 Main Street, Dumbo, Brooklyn, NY
$10 admission (suggested)

Hosts Zach Layton and Nick Hallett DJ “rigorous” experimental music by Cage, Cacciapaglia, and Cardew et al before and after the concert.

http://www.darmstadtnewmusic.org

A former Galapagos Resident Artist (and bartender!), Sweeten’s work is looted from lotions of the historic and the psychosomatic. His primary instrument is an oscilloscope, used to create sound-generated imagery as early as 1950 by animator Ben Laposky, and evoking the abstractions of computer art pioneer John Whitney. Combining analog and digital techniques, Sweeten creates in the intersection between sound and vision, and between the early roots of the visual music medium and its mesmerizing future.

In ‘93 Ray Sweeten entered the TIMARA program at Oberlin Conservatory. In ‘98 he acquired a residency at Fabrica, spa., Italy. He produced works for Robert Wilson, MTV Japan and Italy, UNESCO and performed throughout Europe with Benetton-funded social experiment “FabricaMusica”. He has been artist-in-residence at Harvestworks and E.T.C. and has released work on Suction Records, Kinetic Media, Btbmo, Ghostly International, TSHDT and Collette. Since relocating to New York in 2000, Sweeten has performed and screened work at The Kitchen, PS1, NY Underground Film Festival, NY Independent Film Festival, CinemaTexas, Liverpool Biennial, Aurora Picture Show, Lux2008 Spain and The san Francisco Electronic Music Festival. Sweeten has also taught electronic music for teens and young people at Community Musicworks (RI), Vibe Songmakers (NY), The Guggenheim Museum (NY) and is currently an Interface Developer and Information Architect at Market Maker Interactive.


EVENT

MANUEL GOTTSCHING and JOSHUA LIGHT SHOW perform at LINCOLN CENTER OUT OF DOORS as part of


Dates:
Fri Aug 15, 2008 00:00 - Tue Aug 12, 2008

Joshua Light Show to perform free outdoor concert with German electronic musician Manuel Göttsching at Lincoln Center Out of Doors Festival on August 15, 2008

800 Years of Minimalism: The Spiritual Transcendent
Presented by Lincoln Center Out of Doors and Wordless Music
Beata Viscera: The Music of Pérotin
Rhys Chatham: A Crimson Grail, for 200 Electric Guitars (Outdoor Version) (World Premiere)
Manuel Göttsching: E2-E4 (U.S. Premiere)
With the Joshua Light Show (World Premiere collaboration)

The Joshua Light Show, known by many a New Yorker for creating the iconic psychedelic imagery that set the stage for musicans such as Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, The Who, Grateful Dead, The Doors and Frank Zappa at Bill Graham's legendary lower-east-side rock palace, the Fillmore East, performs this summer at Lincoln Center’s Damrosch Park alongside German electronic musician Manuel Göttsching for the American concert premiere of seminal minimalist compostion, E2-E4.

Led by multimedia artist and television director Joshua White, a team of live-cinema artists will literally fill the clam-shaped bandshell of Damrosch Park with an eye-popping display of kinetic effects and colorful abstractions. Improvised in real time using a variety of classic techniques—including the signature oil-and-water “wet show”—and mixed with video, the Joshua Light Show stands out in contrast to much of the pre-programmed, computer-based animation commonplace in contemporary video design. The Joshua Light Show will feature the contributions of White's senior collaborator, Bec Stupak, in addition to the artists Alyson Denny, Seth Kirby, and Brock Monroe.

**NOTE: THIS IS THE FIRST EVER DIGITAL, SINGLE PROJECTION PRESENTATION OF THE JLS IN NEW YORK

This world-premiere collaboration with Manuel Göttsching is the finale of a concert entitled “800 Years of Minimalism - The Spiritual Transcendent,” co-presented by Lincoln Center Out Of Doors and Wordless Music, which features the music of Pérotin performed by newly-formed vocal ensemble Beata Viscera and the outdoor premiere of a new work for 200 electric guitars by Rhys Chatham. The concert will take place at 7pm on Friday, August 15, at Lincoln Center’s Damrosch Park, best accessed from 62nd street between Amsterdam and Columbus avenues. The entire event is free-of-charge and open to the public.

Joshua White studied theater at Carnegie Mellon University and film at University of Southern California. He is well-known for developing the lightshow at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East during the late 1960s. At this time, he also created special effects for the film Midnight Cowboy. After the lightshow’s performance at Woodstock in 1969, White shifted to giant-screen video projection and then to directing television. His credits include Seinfeld, The Max Headroom Show, Club MTV and Inside The Actors Studio. In the 1990s, White returned to creating fine art installations in collaboration with Michael Smith, and in 2004 developed a new lightshow with comic artist and designer, Gary Panter. The first show since 1969 billed as Joshua Light Show was performed in April 2007 at The Kitchen. Subsequent engagements include headlining the annual Netmage live media festival in Bologna alongside the music of Simeon Coxe/Silver Apples and a four-day residency at the Issue Project Room in Brooklyn. His artwork has shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C., Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, Tate Liverpool, Kunsthalle Schim Frankfurt, Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, and the Kunsthalle Wien. His “Liquid Loops” DVD is available for purchase from The Center for Visual Music. The Joshua Light Show has also contributed psychedelic art for the Public Theater’s current production of Hair as part of Shakespeare in the Park at the Delacorte Theater.

7pm to 10pm
(E2-E4 to begin at 8:45 sharp)
free to the public
DAMROSCH PARK
62nd street at Amsterdam


EVENT

Half of the People Are Stoned and the Other Half Are Waiting for the Next Election*


Dates:
Tue Jul 01, 2008 00:00 - Mon Jun 16, 2008

Tuesday, July 1, 2008 at 8pm

Light Industry presents

Half of the People Are Stoned and the Other Half Are Waiting for the Next Election*

Curated by Nick Hallett

*A line written by Paul Simon for Leonard Bernstein's Mass (1971).

A screening of activism-oriented video, performance documentation, and new media from 2004.

As the race to the White House consumes our nation's collective attention, let's take a look back to the 2004 election and celebrate the unique spirit of that year when the art world in New York and across the country took up the mantle of this country's great activist tradition.

Many artists who make political work do so regardless of their calendars, but the high stakes of '04 yielded contexts for agit-prop art and performance unseen since the late 1960s. Initiatives like Downtown for Democracy and the Imagine Festival united New York's artist communities against the Bush administration as the RNC rolled into town. The Internet matured as a critical venue for countercultural action in attempts to revise standard models of protest. Audiences and critics, eager to experience their own distaste for the current state of affairs distilled into forms of art and entertainment, gave greater voice to explicitly political work. Guerrilla theater filled the streets at every opportunity for nose-thumbing, resulting in countless arrests, while cellphone cameras rolled to create a new kind of folk-documentary. Culture and politics collided in vivid and memorable fashion.

This collection of work from four years ago offers itself as something of a time capsule, although not enough time has passed for true nostalgia to set in. Yet the 2008 election is playing itself out very differently than its predecessor. Without a concrete enemy to inspire rage, Americans--artists included--seem to be placing their faith in the system and its candidates. But how different is our country's situation? Aren't we even worse off than four years ago?

Artists include Cory Arcangel/Jonah Peretti, Carbon Defense League, Imaginary Company, Institute for Applied Autonomy, Pauline Oliveros/Ryan Junell, Saul Levine, Jen Liu, Taylor Mac, Laura Parnes, Pink Bloque, Wynne Greenwood, Julie Atlas Muz, Seth Price, Guy Richards Smit/John Pilson/Lou Fernandez, Suicide/Punkcast, Tigger, Aldo Tambellini, Aaron Valdez, and Patrick Lichty/The Yes Men.

Nick Hallett is a musician and curator interested in the intersection of music and visual media. He has programmed at The Kitchen, Netmage, Aurora Picture Show, All Tomorrow's Parties, Artists's Television Access, Pacific Film Archive, Ocularis, Monkey Town, Issue Project Room, New York Underground Film Festival, Chicago Filmmakers, Chicago Underground Film Festival, Mass Art Film Society, and Secret Project Robot among others. His music series, Darmstadt, hosted with Zach Layton, was included in the New York Times's "Best of New Music 2007." He originated the band Plantains, which from 2000 to 2003 performed as a live multimedia outfit, incorporating electronic music and video. Nick enjoys performing music of several varieties, namely experimental contemporary art song of his and other's doing, and has sung recently at The Kitchen and Joe's Pub.

Light Industry is a new venue for film and electronic art in Brooklyn, New York. Developed and overseen by Thomas Beard and Ed Halter, the project will begin as a series of weekly events at Industry City in Sunset Park, each organized by a different artist, critic, or curator.

Half of the People Are Stoned and the Other Half Are Waiting for the Next Election
presented by Light Industry
at Industry City
8:00 pm
55 33rd Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenue), 3rd Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11232
D, M, N, R trains to 36th Street
Tickets - $6, available at door


EVENT

ANTHEIL'S LEGACY at 3LD


Dates:
Sat Jun 07, 2008 00:00 - Mon May 05, 2008

Robotic Orchestra Meets Avant-Garde Film Masterpiece Ballet Mécanique in
ANTHEIL’S LEGACY
Tribute to Composer Showcases Legendary 1924 Score with Fernand Léger Film:
NYC Debut of Ballet Mécanique Performed by 25-piece Automated Orchestra
PLUS Performances by Lukas Ligeti, Kathleen Supové, Joshua Fried, Luke Taylor, Harris Wulfson

Hourglass Group in association with Yamaha Pianos and Other Minds is proud to present ANTHEIL’S LEGACY, a rare public presentation of George Antheil’s groundbreaking 1924 music composition Ballet Mécanique, performed live in NYC for the first time by the 25-piece automated orchestra created by LEMUR: League of Electronic Musical Urban Robots. The live score will accompany a screening of the recently restored film Ballet Mécanique created by Fernand Léger and Dudley Murphy. This not-to-be-missed event on June 7th at 3LD Art & Technology Center is the first time NYC audiences will be able to experience the legendary film-with-music (the first “music video”) as originally conceived by the artists 84 years ago.

Curated by Charles Amirkhanian, Executive & Artistic Director of Other Minds (San Francisco, CA) and music executor of Antheil's estate, ANTHEIL’S LEGACY will feature performances by cutting-edge composer-musicians who are carrying on the radical musical spirit of avant-garde composer George Antheil (1900-1959): Lukas Ligeti, Kathy Supové, Joshua Fried, Luke Taylor and Harris Wulfson. ANTHEIL’S LEGACY will follow a benefit performance of Elyse Singer's play, FREQUENCY HOPPING. Winner of the 2007 STAGE International Script Competition, FREQUENCY HOPPING is a multidisciplinary work based on the 1940 collaboration between Hollywood starlet Hedy Lamarr and composer George Antheil on a secret communication system. Antheil’s knowledge of player piano technology greatly influenced their invention, now recognized as a model for wireless communication.

When Antheil set out to write Ballet Mécanique in 1924, he believed that, with the help of Parisian piano maker Pleyel, it would be possible to synchronize multiple player pianos, but as time grew closer for the premiere, he learned that the idea was not technically feasible. Antheil re-wrote the score for a single player piano and a large number of live pianists.

During his lifetime, Antheil was never able to achieve the precise synchronization between 4-16 player pianos that he had originally imagined. Fast forward to 1999, when composer-musician Paul Lehrman used digital technology to synchronize 16 pianos via MIDI; with computers, the original instrumentation and synchronization could finally be realized in a live concert setting. In 2006, Lehrman teamed up with celebrated Brooklyn-based music-technology outfit LEMUR to automate the entire 25-piece orchestra for the Dada Exhibit at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

Never before has Ballet Mécanique been presented in NYC with the precise synchronization and instrumentation of sound-and-image envisioned by its creators in the 1920s. With the support of Anthology Film Archives, who have meticulously restored the original film, Paul Lehrman has been working to ensure the utmost musical and historical accuracy for this presentation at 3LD. Ballet Mécanique will be performed by 8 synchronized Yamaha Disklavier player pianos plus an automated ensemble of 2 xylophones, 4 bass drums, tamtam, siren, 7 bells and 3 airplane propellers.

Preceding the performance of Ballet Mécanique, Charles Amirkhanian will introduce three contemporary composers whose works explore unique connections between music and technology. The program includes: Lukas Ligeti’s Delta Space for Disklavier and tape to be performed by renowned pianist Kathleen Supové; Luke Taylor’s Equal Tempered Canon for James Tenney for four Disklaviers and a new untitled work by Harris Wulfson. The afterparty will feature a reception and Joshua Fried’s Radio Wonderland, which manipulates sounds taken from live FM radio using a steering wheel and robotic shoes as instruments.

Hourglass Group develops adventurous new plays and reinvestigate neglected vintage American comedies. Past productions include Beebo Brinker Chronicles (2008 GLAAD Media Award), which transferred Off-Broadway to 37 Arts produced by Lily Tomlin and Jane Wagner; Trouble in Paradise (2007 Obie) and the critically acclaimed revival of Mae West's SEX. More info: www.hourglassgroup.org

ANTHEIL’S LEGACY will be presented June 7, 2008 following the 8pm benefit performance of FREQUENCY HOPPING. Tickets for the event are $25 to $100 and include a post-show reception with the artists. 3LD Art & Technology Center is located at 80 Greenwich St. (at Rector St. -- accessible from the 1/R/W trains at Rector St.). To buy tickets, call 212-352-3101 or visit www.frequencyhopping.net.