Whitebox Art Center
info@whiteboxny.org
Works in New York, New York United States of America

BIO
Whitebox is a non-profit art space that serves as a platform for contemporary artists to develop and showcase new site-specific work, and is a laboratory for unique commissions, exhibitions, special events, salon series, and arts education programs.

Whitebox offers free and diverse programs for the surrounding communities including Chinatown, the Lower East Side, and international cultural tourism to experience an artist’s work in a meaningful manner.

Whitebox Art Center Vision

Through site-specific exhibitions, performances, screenings, readings, lectures, and panel discussions, Whitebox provides the opportunity to experience an artist’s practice in a meaningful way to the surrounding communities of Chinatown, the Lower East Side, and cultural tourism. It is Whitebox’s artistic vision to provide artists with sustained exposure, and create the environment for more in-depth interaction between audiences and artists’ practices. As a non-profit art space, Whitebox aims to be a space for invention. It achieves this by inviting emerging and established artists to respond to its exhibition space with interventions, performances, and developing long-term programming that allows them to develop projects and engage with audiences.

Whitebox Art Center’s History

Whitebox Art Center was founded in 1998. Within its first two years, Whitebox was nominated for “Best Group Show” by the International Art Critics Association for Plural Speech and for a survey of Viennese Actionists, Günter Brus and Hermann Nitsch. During its first decade, Whitebox Art Center built a reputation for producing thought-provoking exhibitions and initiatives that fostered engagement among a broad audience, including neighborhood low-income housing communities and the Bayview Women’s Prison.

The organization of Whitebox is at a pivotal transitional stage; building upon its sixteen year legacy of presenting contemporary art in the spirit of the avante-garde, Whitebox is expanding its mission to incorporate an annual international photography festival and yearlong salon series, increasing sustained support and exposure for artists.
Discussions (0) Opportunities (0) Events (18) Jobs (0)
EVENT

CLICK CLICK CLICK


Dates:
Tue Sep 02, 2014 19:00 - Tue Sep 02, 2014

Location:
New York, NY , New York
United States of America

Whitebox Art Center presents

AS PART OF "CODED AFTER LOVELACE’S" CLOSING EVENT

"CLICK CLICK CLICK"

Click. Click. Click. Copy. Paste. Drag. Drop. These are the new gestures of digital image making. Click Click Click is a survey of contemporary digital moving image practices that span GIFs, augmented performances, green screen keying, collage, appropriation, Processing, 3D renders and more.

Artists in the screening: Morehshin Allahyari, Claudia Bitran, Hannah Black, Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Jennifer Chan, Jennie Cole, Claire Evans, Dafna Ganani, Geraldine Juárez, Nicole Killian, Claudia Maté, Raquel Meyers, Lorna Mills, Eva Papamargariti, Sabrina Ratté, Tessa Siddle, Giselle Zatonyl

Nicole Killian, Move It, 2013, 30 sec.

Move It is an excerpt from an ongoing investigation into getting the crowd pumped up and moving.

Lorna Mills, Jump Rope, 2011, GIF

Lorna Mills channels and trolls the internet through her assemblage GIFs. Searching the far reaching corners of the world wide web, Mills pulls out the most peculiar, inane, and baffling imagery and then recontextualizes it into her own carefully crafted compositions.

Claudia Bitran, The Zone: Action, 2013, 3:17 min

The Zone is a series of three trailers for movies that do not exist: a Korean horror film, a Latino action film, and a French drama film. In the Latino action trailer, I perform as Macarena de las Heras, a strong and determined woman who has to go through different adventures in order to enter “The Zone.” She rides motorcycles, fights gangsters, tries to get information from the gatas, and shoots guns while running through the desert and making out with hot guys.

Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Conspirativas (series), 2013, GIF

These collaborative images capture an intersection between the artists’ loving interrogations of celebrity culture (Cepeda) and pornography (Minoliti). The result is an image that tackles female sexuality in its vicissitudes.

Claudia Maté, Fill Shapes, 2012, 1:54 min.

Fill Shapes uses Processing and After Effects to make squares and circles dance across the screen in this brightly colored geometric fantasy.

Lorna Mills, Garden Variety (series), 2013, GIF

Lorna Mills, Stress Relief, 2011, GIF

Eva Papamargariti, RandomAccessData, 2014, 4:50 min.

RandomAccessData is a parallel visual and verbal narration between references; it is a stream of information that creates a tag cloud based on random thoughts about post- internet art, radical utopian groups of the ’60s, today’s virtual field, the definitive role of searching and tagging inside the cyberspace, terms like distribution and reproduction of image, constant data flow, internet immersion, real ID vs cyber ID and the notion of auto generated content.

Dafna Ganani, I Dream of I Dream of Jennie, 2013, 3:42 min.

I Dream of I Dream of Jennie is a mediated performance by the artist Dafna Ganani. It references the 70′s American TV series I Dream of Jeannie and uses glitched images of copyrights licenses, biopunked Barbara Eden in her Jeannie costume, dolphins, BIOS homepage to propose a cybernetics fantasy: beings with both organic and cybernetic parts.

Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Conspirativas (series), 2013, GIFs

Hannah Black, Intensive Care/Hot New Track, 2013, 5:36 min

Remixed fragments of what’s allowed to appear on the surface of the world: Rihanna/Chris Brown, US/Iraq, blackness/whiteness, pain/pleasure, money/body. “Love and shame are the theory and the practice.”

Lorna Mills, Garden Variety (series), 2013, GIF

Geraldine Juárez, Love Not Money, 2009, 1:06 min

In 2009, months after the stock market meltdown, i created a personal stock market to track my assets: desires, work, routines, expectations and emotions – and how the way i valued them felt closer to death, money or love.

The video is the output of four weeks of emotional capitalism, where my assets were collected in a notebook and mapped and visualized originally in Processing.

Claire Evans, Digital Decay: Meditation/Disintegration, 2011, 1:50 min

Meditation/Disintegration is an animation of individual video frames saved in incrementally lower file formats hundreds and hundreds of times. Where is the line at which compression ceases to preserve information entirely? The digital image washes away on the tide of its own preservation. The beach ball is the third eye.

Lorna Mills, Splode (series), 2012, GIF

Morehshin Allahyari, The Romantic Self-Exiles I, 2012, 5:06 min.

To build a land; an imaginary home. To push the limits of real and unreal, memory and imagination, locality and universality. To put together my most vivid memories on flat planes or 3D cubes. Inside and outside the empty rooms, rooms without bodies, rooms left behind. A reflection and presentation of emotional attachments. Collective and personal.

Jennie Cole, a device of a special type, 2012, 3:32 min.

a device of special type investigates encounters with text in electronic media, in response to Donna Haraway’s assertion that writing is ‘pre-eminently the technology of cyborgs’. Exploring ideas of transhumanist possibility alongside the manipulations of identity suggested by the internet’s corporate ‘like’, the language in this video is at once page-based, screen-based, illuminated and infiltrated by symbols and logos.

Lorna Mills, Garden Variety (series), 2013, GIFs

Tessa Siddle, Hexenhaus, 2010, 2:47 min.

Hexenhaus is a video fragment from a series of work about domestic ritual and relations between humans, houseplants, and animals. Following the collapse of a relationship a failed banishing ritual is performed with my pet houseplants/familiars. An attempt to convert loneliness into solitude results in only more loneliness.

Nicole Killian, Attention, 2013, 2:53 min.

Attention is a video exploring mall madness and meditation.

Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Conspirativas (series), 2013, GIFs

Giselle Zatonyl, The Harm of Coming into Existence, 2014, 1:57 min.

Zatonyl’s 3D rendered video juxtaposes glittery, soft colors with hard lines forming an imaginative factoy-like space that produces unknown, but assuredly delightful things.

Jennifer Chan, Boyfriend 男友 [Nanyou], 2014, 6:27 min.

BOYFRIEND combines YouTube-captured webcam videos with images of dominant East Asian masculinity. Headlined by a Mandarin cover of Justin Bieber’s pop hit Boyfriend, K-pop stars, J-pop stars, Taiwanese diaspora, and Canto-pop icons, are recut against confessional Asian American “dudes” to deliberate the superficial aspects of performing the archetypal romantic straight male partner in Asian culture.

Lorna Mills, Linguine Primavera, 2013, GIF

Lorna Mills, Kitty Fire, 2011, GIF

Raquel Meyers, 2SLEEP1 ❚❚❚❚❚❚❚ 002. MATSAMÖT, 2013, 3:23 min.

Matsamöt is part of 2SLEEP1, a playlist of audiovisual performances in text mode, designed to make you fall asleep. The music interface and the graphics are built up from text symbols (PETSCII). Made by Raquel Meyers and Goto80 using c-64.

Sabrina Ratté, The Land Behind, 2013, 4:56 min.

Traveling on an undefined territory where the illusion of a continuous tracking shot emphasizes an unreachable destination. Through the syncopated editing and multiple transitions, images of the area themselves become traveling entities, creating confusion on the level of the depicted space as much as with the level of its temporality.

Photo caption : Still from Sabrina Ratté’s The Land Behind, 2013, 4:56 min.


EVENT

Coded After Lovelace


Dates:
Thu Aug 14, 2014 18:00 - Tue Sep 02, 2014

Coded After Lovelace

Curated by Faith Holland & Nora O’ Murchú

Exhibition on view August 14th – September 2nd 2014
Opening reception Thursday August 14th | 6-8pm

Carla Gannis | Claudia Hart | Olia Lialina | Jillian Mayer | Rosa Menkman | Arleen Schloss | Lillian F Schwartz

“Artists have always been among the first to reflect on the culture and technology of their time, and decades before the digital revolution had been officially proclaimed, they were experimenting with the digital medium”

- Christian Paul, Digital Art (2003) Thames & Hudson.

New York City – Coded After Lovelace offers a survey of art that critically reflects on the creative use of technology: its developments and limitations. From the room-sized computers of the Bell Labs era to the tablet-based work of today, these seven artists question the boundary between art and technology. Coded After Lovelace creates a new lineage across artists of different generations.

Long before digital art became a popularized form, Lillian Schwartz used the computer as a tool to create abstract prints and films. An early artist-in-residence at Bell Laboratories, her experiments laid the foundation for future generations of digital artists and practitioners.

In contrast, Arleen Schloss drew from her experience as an active member of the Downtown New York scene. An energetic explorer of new media, Schloss’s work examines language (and more specifically, the alphabet) as a technology, which she performs and materializes using laser projections.

A pioneering net artist and theorist, Olia Lialina was early to recognize the World Wide Web’s potential as a medium for artistic experimentation. Informed by her background in filmmaking, Lialina used what was then a novel format, the GIF, to reflect an emerging web vernacular.

The role of the computer in shifting representational values is key to Claudia Hart’s work on identity and virtuality. Her innovative 3D work subverts the typical iconography adopted by the commercial computer graphics industry and defies expectations with its slow-paced, contemplative, and emotional qualities.

Carla Gannis’s Non-Facial Recognition project challenges surveillance softwares through a playful digital manipulation of social media profile images. Remixing photos sent to her by friends and followers, Gannis transforms photographic portraits into digital assemblages that are no longer merely visual data for military-industrial algorithms.

Through experiments with video compression, feedback, and other forms of noise, Rosa Menkman creates works specific to digital media. Beyond the intentional corruption of various file formats, Menkman’s works, constantly in a state of flux, deconstruct culture, politics, and the history of technology to create unique glitched audio-visuals.

Jillian Mayer’s You’ll Be Okay offers comfort to the viewer faced with a myriad of digital anxieties. Whether it be the impending Singularity-the uploading of our material selves into a nebulous digital cloud–or simply too many push notifications, Mayer paradoxically uses digitally generated images to allay the fears associated with that very technology.



Coded After Lovelace concludes with a closing event on September 2nd (7 – 10pm) featuring “Click Click Click,” a screening of contemporary digital video and GIF works that encompass a broad variety of practices and approaches, including artists Lorna Mills, Jennifer Chan, Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Nicole Killian, Giselle Zatonyl, Claudia Maté, Dafna Ganani, Tessa Siddle, Morehshin Allahyari, Eva Papamargariti, Sabrina Ratté, Geraldine Juárez, Claire Evans, and more to be announced.

Press Contact: press@whiteboxny.org


EVENT

NO EXIT: A Project by Khaled Jarrar


Dates:
Thu Jul 24, 2014 17:00 - Thu Aug 07, 2014

Location:
New York, New York
United States of America

Whitebox Art Center presents

NO EXIT
A Project by Khaled Jarrar

Exhibition on view July 24th– August 7th 2014
Opening reception at Whitebox Art Center | July 24th | 5-7pm

New York City - Whitebox Art Center presents a solo show by Palestinian artist Khaled Jarrar, produced and curated by Myriam Vanneschi.

The Israel Border Police denied artist Khaled Jarrar exit to travel to NYC for this project and his participation in the show Here and Elsewhere at the New Museum. He has since decided to create a new work for this show that deals with his status as well as the current situation in Gaza. This new media piece will be live updated as the situation develops.

Khaled Jarrar describes his experience attempting to leave Palestine on July 23rd, 2014:

“Another massacre is taking place in Gaza, and Israel is trying to sell it as a war with Hamas using a deceptive media campaign, turning the oppressed into a villain. It is a fact that Israel is an occupying and apartheid country that controls our land, steals our water and natural resources, depriving us of our basic human rights for the past 66 years. The Israeli recurrent massacres will never end. Telling and sharing our stories and what is happening in Palestine is very essential. We are obliged to take the streets and strongly condemn the killing of the people of Gaza”.

NO EXIT is produced and curated by Myriam Vanneschi and co-produced by Igor Molochevski.
The programs of Whitebox Art Center are made possible in part by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Link to Whitebox Art Center: http://whiteboxnyc.org/

Press Contact: press@whiteboxny.org


EVENT

Honky


Dates:
Fri Jun 20, 2014 18:00 - Sun Jun 22, 2014

Location:
New York, New York
United States of America

Whitebox Art Center and MAK Gallery present

Piotr Skiba’s New York Premiere Performance

On view June 20th through 22nd 2014
Opening reception June 20th | 6-8pm

New York City – Piotr Skiba’s New York premiere performance — HONKY — features a series of video installations that make use of elements of the ready-made & the found, combined with sequential performance footage to produce a single, if contextually fragmented, narrative focused on individual displacement. In a series of episodic self-portraiture — as if unpacking the Russian dolls of invented characters — Skiba offers a glimpse of his self-made mythology on the one hand, while on the other he opens a discussion on alterity, and the intense erosion of tolerance affecting the homogenous society of Poland.

The artist, penetrating the fluid boundary between himself and the Other, multiplies the motif of the mask. White mask vs. Black mask. Negative space, the relevant shapes; the “real” subject of conversation is oftentimes created by a deliberate reversal of the figure and ground. A Honky-Polack drowning in the incomprehensible soundscape of New York illuminates the desolation of the anonymous hobo-preacher, whose black silhouette seemed so arbitrarily pinned onto the whiteboard of Skiba’s hometown as to become his shamanic alter ego. Skiba projects persistent feelings of displacement — by setting things in a configuration and an environment where they in their turn displace and alienate, and thereby acquire a new aspect, an unfamiliar affect despite being familiar objects and ordinary people.

The key to the curatorial perspective may lie in the sculpture of Black Homer: an oversized plush “bath slipper” sprayed with matte paint which transforms one of the most influential characters in the history of TV — Homer Simpson — into a powerful totemic presence. Flattened by a black finish, the already dull features of this American suburban stereotype take on a painfully amorphous yet threatening expression. Power found, or power redeemed by blackness on a flip of this particular coin feeding a fascination of a young Polack with hip-hop, or rap culture.

The viewer is thrown into a disturbing carnival of schizophrenia when confronted by either the hoodie of the imaginary Negro from Skiba’s performance, a white high-end latex mask reminiscent of bank robberies, or the impenetrability of a foreign language described by Canetti as an ‘acoustic mask’. By a series of transpositions performed on the artist’s own face, body, or individual limbs used as fragmented images isolated from their original context, Skiba produces the associations of exclusion, loss, and finally, impending madness.


EVENT

Narcistecture


Dates:
Fri Jun 13, 2014 18:00 - Thu Jul 03, 2014

Location:
New York, New York
United States of America

Whitebox Art Center presents

Narcistecture
New Photographs by Klaus Pichler

Opening reception Friday June 13th | 6-8pm
Exhibition on view June 13th – July 3rd 2014

Curated by Carolina Sandretto and Tony Guerrero