Nicolas Sassoon
Since 2004
nicolassassoon@hotmail.com
Works in Vancouver Canada

PORTFOLIO (1)
BIO
The work of Nicolas Sassoon makes use of various computer-based aesthetics to generate fantasized visions of architectures, landscapes and domestic environments. While most of Sassoon’s work is published online through the format of animated gifs, the artists has in collaboration with other artists, architects, curators, music producers, and fashion designers, materialized this web-based practice in a diverse range of mediums such as sculpture, prints, textiles, and site-specific installations. Sassoon’s work often explores the material application of immaterial concepts, through a practice that investigates the manner in which virtual spaces and thinking can (or cannot) be inscribed within the physical realm.

Nicolas is a member of the online collective Computers Club. Nicolas has shown in various international venues and events such as the Miami Art Fair (US), the Tokyo Art Fair (JP), Today Art Museum (CN), Portland Art Museum (US), Cincinnati Art Museum (US), 319 Scholes (US), Eyebeam (US), Every Letter in the Alphabet (CA), Charles H.Scott Gallery (CA), Western Front (CA), TINBOX Contemporary Art Gallery (FR), LMD Galerie (FR), the Berlin Fashion Week (DE), and MU Eindhoven (NL). Nicolas lives and works in Vancouver BC, Canada.

WITCHCRAFT: Craftsmanship, personal mythologies, and spiritual queries in the digital realm


This essay was written in conjunction with the exhibition "Witchcraft," which opened February 19th, 2015 at Initial Gallery in Vancouver. "Witchcraft" features the work of Laura Brothers, Brenna Murphy, Krist Wood, and Sara Ludy. The show—along with this essay—considers personal mythology, craftsmanship and spiritual inquiry as entry points to these artists' practices. "In a contemporary artistic landscape focused on self-branding strategies and social media legibility," curator Nicolas Sassoon argues, "these four artists appear as valuable voices bringing a poetic breadth to what it means to engage artistically with computer technology and the internet." This essay accompanies the exhibition, elaborating on these ideas through the lens of Sassoon's personal experience.

 

"Witchcraft," exhibition view. Photo courtesy Initial Gallery.

"Computing has always been personal. By this I mean that if you weren't intensely involved in it, sometimes with every fiber in your body, you weren't doing computers, you were just a user."

- Ted Nelson

At the end of 2008, my awareness of net-based practices was almost nonexistent. I had just moved to Vancouver from France and finished creating my first blog as a distraction from solitude. My engagement with online communities was limited to searching forums to modify the HTML of my blog posts. Still, earlier in the year, I had come across the work of Laura Brothers. After browsing Laura's website extensively, I started a conversation with her via emails and animated GIFs. This conversation led to my involvement in Computers Club, along with the discovery of many artists active within and around that platform at the time.

In 2008, Computers Club was a unique collective of internet personas, particularly committed to shaping the intricacies of their online space. A few years ago, in an Artist Profile for Rhizome, co-founder Krist Wood gave a minimal definition of the online collective—"a set of identities that derive from computer users." Many of these identities had accumulated seemingly endless content across multiple websites while revealing little to nothing in the way of personally identifiable information. The collective's website acted as a central station—mysterious about its inner workings—where  the navigation of this content would start. The accumulation of works from each artist delineated the backgrounds of enigmatic characters, modeling personal mythologies through visual vernaculars and experimentations. Between 2008 and 2011, I encountered through this platform the work of Laura Brothers, Sara Ludy, Krist Wood, and Brenna Murphy. Their collection of online works was constantly updated, bringing weekly developments to their digital territories and increasing the frequency of my visits.



SAVED WORKS (1)