Miklos Legrady
Since the beginning
miklos@sympatico.ca
Works in Toronto Canada

PORTFOLIO (5)
BIO
Miklos Legrady is an artist working in media/time-based art,
painting, photography, holography, performance,
and critical text.

He received a B.Sc. from the Visual Studies Workshop, Rochester,
N.Y, and an M.F.A. from Concordia University in Montreal.

In 1995 he was co-founder of the New York performance group"
The Collective Unconscious", where he was co-director
and performing artist for 3 years.

He has taught web design at the Fine Arts Academy in Budapest, Hungary,
and pursued digital research at the c3 /Soros Foundation.
He created the Mikidot brand on his return
to Toronto in 1998.

His work in painting and photography
is represented in the www.ccca.ca archive.
Discussions (75) Opportunities (1) Events (1) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

I'd welcome feedback on this note, text to a body of work


Post-contemporary Modernism
mapping the subliminal
2002-2012

Pop culture is a way of seeing; biofeedback, emoreaction, sensations,
all of which hint at a vocabulary of shape, color, texture... at this point things get a little sticky.

In a McLuhan-like glance at the ability of the medium to be a message,
our feedback describe a response, but there must be a language since we have a description.

It is possible that thoughts, ideas, concepts, are semantic constructions which can exists just as easely
in non-verbal, non-intellectual systems where shades, depth, angle and illumination describe complex meanings,
serve as a vocabulary for a language of sight as complex as the language of speech, currently our predominant intellectual tool.

Could there be a grammar of sensations, even going further can we have a dictionary of abstract symbols?
It's the brain vs mind conundrum. A visual art concept depends on a material substrate such as colors, paint,
but when these are altered, shaped by body language and unconscious directives,
new images and new concepts emerge that did not exist in the artist's mind prior to production.

"In science, if you know what you are doing, you should not be doing it.
In engineering, if you do not know what you are doing, you should not be doing it.
Of course, you seldom, if ever, see either pure state."

—Richard Hamming, The Art of Doing Science and Engineering

Art is closer to psychology; we can approach it like a science, at least in how we think of it,
but the making of art remains, well... an art rather than a science.

Ideas seek to shape matter, whose resistance informs and alters the idea (towards an ideal)
leading to an adaptation better suited to the physical limitations of matter;
what then emerges is a third element, something unexpected, something new.

In this work I wanted to deal with unknowns, specifically to cast beyond conscious expectations,
assuming I would discover the unseen and unpredicted when selecting images chosen by feelings and intuition.
As we enter a realm of grammatical contradiction we're forced to a higher level of interpretation;
now we no longer read a personal story so much as get a feel of the culture within which this work was made.

In these paintings language is the primary concern, exploring how formal elements create a style
which then influences and directs the contextual reading of the work.

http://www.mikloslegrady.com/paintings/modernism/statement.html

DISCUSSION

No Bad Art at OCAD


Encouraging students to make no bad art
is a step in the right direction

Friday Sept.7, 2007, the first week of school,
a No Bad Art exhibition on McCaul street in Toronto
welcomed Ontario College of Art and Design students back to the real
world


http://www.ccca.ca/mikidot/photo/artcrimes_ocad/
http://www.ccca.ca/mikidot/photo/artcrimes/

______________

Miklos Legrady
310 Bathurst st.
Toronto ON
M5T 2S3
416-203-1846 - home
647-292-1846 - cell
http://www.mikidot.com

DISCUSSION

Re: on painting and new media


Hi Paul,

As with your own letter, mine was also written rather quickly
following that conversation with Rae about painting, and as you point
out there are problems with my wording, partly because I'm tackling
two complex issues in one short note, the first being the artist's
personal experience and the other of the social position of painting
today.

Concerning your final comments, I remember back in the 1960's when
black and white photography was seen as an art form and color
photography wasn't (I'm generalising again when considering shifting
opinions of decades up to that time and later). I think we can put
the "is it more art" question to rest when looking at "art" as the
concerned intellectual and aesthetic effort to communicate with
objects, sound, movement, etc.

"I somehow doubt that it's going to get a lot of attention or serious
consideration due to the wording". If there is a real problem, bad
grammar or lack of clarity shouldn't be the criterion to judge the
issue. Of course I should have said "less" technical intermediary,
in the sense that new media technology aids, defines and channels
production while painting does much less along those lines (notice my
"safe" wording here - which is still open to rebutal...). That's not
an issue of comparative quality as art. Your letter does raise an
interesting question along the lines of "the more you have, the more
you spend"; the more technology assists us, the higher the bar raised
as to what's expected.

So let me reword my notes; "considering the technical differences in
media, and the exhibition venues currently available, is the painting
medium deprecated/discouraged as an art form, and is this a good or
bad thing?

Miklos Legrady

On Jun 11, 2007, at 11:35 AM, Pall Thayer wrote:

> I understand where you're coming from but I don't agree with some
> of the wording of your letter and I somehow doubt that it's going
> to get a lot of attention or serious consideration due to the
> wording. As with a number of my posts, this was written pretty
> quickly and may contain errors and contradictions. I'll deal with
> them as they arise.
>
> First of all, saying that new media is "easy and pleasant" in
> comparison to painting sounds awful. If painting is what you're
> into and you've been doing it for a number of years, it's just as
> "easy and pleasant" as any other medium will be to someone who
> knows it well. Computer-based arts tend to be a bit cleaner,
> require less space and are somewhat less physical but that doesn't
> make painting less easy or pleasant. I painted for years before
> turning completely to computer-based art and there were several
> things about painting that I found much easier. One would be the
> DIFFERENCE in the technical mediation between me and a painting.
> Today, if I want to change something, I have to edit code,
> recompile and then run the work to see the effect. Sometimes I have
> to allow the work to run for 30 to 60 minutes before I can see the
> effects of the change. Sometimes I'll make some changes and the
> work doesn't run at all in which case I could spend anywhere from 2
> minutes to 2 days (or longer) diagnosing and researching the
> problem. On average, I would say that each finished piece is the
> culmination of about 1.5 years of work. When it's time to exhibit
> the piece, a whole new set of potential problems arise. Will the
> piece run properly on the gallery's hardware? Will it work with
> their network configuration? Is their Internet connection reliable
> enough? etc.
>
> To say that painting involves a "creative process without any
> technical intermediary" is just plain wrong. Examples of technical
> intermediaries in painting are brush, canvas, paint, etc. There is
> a difference in the technical mediation in painting and new media,
> but when you begin to really think about it, the difference is not
> as big as one might at first assume. Obviously, applying some paint
> to a canvas with a brush is going to produce immediate results. But
> the overall effect of those results may take a while to emerge and
> make themselves apparent and when they do, you may have to due a
> lot of "debugging" to fix it.
>
> The wording, in the opening to your letter, seems to suggest that
> painting is "more art" than new media, i.e. new media is "easy and
> pleasant" (no pain, no gain) and painting is a "creative process
> without any technical intermediary". A more direct and uninhibited
> creative process. Is new media then veiled behind a mask of
> technical mediation? Flashy yet empty? Should we perhaps view it as
> something fake, masquerading as truly creative art? I'm sure that
> this not at all what you mean, but due to the wording of your
> letter, it could be assumed.
>
> Pall
>
>
>
> On 9-Jun-07, at 12:06 AM, Legrady Miklos wrote:
>
>> copy of a letter about painting as contemporary media
>> sent to the Canada Council
>>
>>
>> A conversation this afternoon with painter Rae Johnson brought up
>> an issue which I wanted to pass on. Discussing painting she
>> repeated something she regularly tells her students at O.C.A.D,
>> that it's a brutal and exhausting process.
>>
>> I was wondering if painting will now or in the future need some
>> kind of special cultural protection or encouragement in Canadian
>> art. I work with new media and photography as well as painting,
>> and I know how easy and pleasant these are to use compared to
>> painting, in which one faces the creative process without any
>> technical intermediary.
>>
>> Renee Baert, in 1987 wrote;
>>
>> "Video is a medium in search of its own authority. ...
>>
>> And, after more than a decade of history,
>>
>> its virtual exclusion from established venues of presentation
>>
>> requires the constant cultivation of a context in which it can
>> exist."
>>
>>
>>
>> "Video in Canada: In Search of Authority."
>>
>> [from the catalogue FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA:
>>
>> Artist-initiated activity in Canada, 1939-1987]
>>
>> http://www.ccca.ca/c/writing/b/baert/baert001t.html
>>
>>
>>
>> The situation has perhaps reversed itself in the last 29 years.
>> From personal experience I know I can produce two or three
>> original photographic series in a year, of 20-40 images, from
>> which work is exhibited and sold within that year, whereas it can
>> take from 2-5 years to produce a single (equally well researched
>> and executed) body of work in painting, for which I often don't
>> find a venue. You see how the painting medium is disadvantaged
>> here as a career vehicle. Rae Johnson's comment above suggests
>> other painters face similar issues.
>>
>> Also worth reviewing the number of calls for painting submissions
>> compared to new media, photography, installation, etc. Of course
>> one questions how much should one should let cultural forces
>> operate unimpeded and where to step in, but it seems painters now
>> have unseen and unacknowledged handicaps compared to other media,
>> that this is worth keeping under observation. Is painting in
>> exclusion from established venues of presentation and does it
>> require the constant cultivation of a context in which it can exist?
>>
>> Sincerely,
>>
>>
>>
>> Miklos Legrady
>> 310 Bathurst st.
>> Toronto ON
>> M5T 2S3
>> 416-203-1846 - home
>> 647-292-1846 - cell
>> http://www.mikidot.com
>> miklos@sympatico.ca
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
> --
> Pall Thayer
> p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca
>
> http://www.this.is/pallit
>
>
>
>

Miklos Legrady
310 Bathurst st.
Toronto ON
M5T 2S3
416-203-1846 - home
647-292-1846 - cell
http://www.mikidot.com
miklos@sympatico.ca

DISCUSSION

on painting and new media


copy of a letter about painting as contemporary media
sent to the Canada Council

A conversation this afternoon with painter Rae Johnson brought up an
issue which I wanted to pass on. Discussing painting she repeated
something she regularly tells her students at O.C.A.D, that it's a
brutal and exhausting process.

I was wondering if painting will now or in the future need some kind
of special cultural protection or encouragement in Canadian art. I
work with new media and photography as well as painting, and I know
how easy and pleasant these are to use compared to painting, in which
one faces the creative process without any technical intermediary.

Renee Baert, in 1987 wrote;

"Video is a medium in search of its own authority. ...

And, after more than a decade of history,

its virtual exclusion from established venues of presentation

requires the constant cultivation of a context in which it can exist."

"Video in Canada: In Search of Authority."

[from the catalogue FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA:

Artist-initiated activity in Canada, 1939-1987]

http://www.ccca.ca/c/writing/b/baert/baert001t.html

The situation has perhaps reversed itself in the last 29 years. From
personal experience I know I can produce two or three original
photographic series in a year, of 20-40 images, from which work is
exhibited and sold within that year, whereas it can take from 2-5
years to produce a single (equally well researched and executed) body
of work in painting, for which I often don't find a venue. You see
how the painting medium is disadvantaged here as a career vehicle.
Rae Johnson's comment above suggests other painters face similar issues.

Also worth reviewing the number of calls for painting submissions
compared to new media, photography, installation, etc. Of course one
questions how much should one should let cultural forces operate
unimpeded and where to step in, but it seems painters now have unseen
and unacknowledged handicaps compared to other media, that this is
worth keeping under observation. Is painting in exclusion from
established venues of presentation and does it require the constant
cultivation of a context in which it can exist?

Sincerely,

Miklos Legrady
310 Bathurst st.
Toronto ON
M5T 2S3
416-203-1846 - home
647-292-1846 - cell
http://www.mikidot.com
miklos@sympatico.ca

EVENT

The Canadian Art Database auction (www.ccca.ca)


Dates:
Wed Mar 21, 2007 00:00 - Mon Mar 19, 2007

Thursday, April 12, 2007

12 on 12
The CCCA 12th Anniversary Art Auction
The Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen St. West, Toronto

Doors open 6:30 pm - Bidding closes 9 pm
Hosted by Randy & Berenicci
Featuring Mindberger & guest performances

The Centre for Contemporary Canadian Art celebrates its 12th Anniversary with a very special event. Over 100 artists have generously donated their work in support of The Canadian Art Database Project. The artworks will be installed over two floors of the Gladstone Hotel.

Advance Public Previews April 11 & 12, Noon - 5 pm

What began as a modest project in 1996 has grown to become the pre-eminent online resource for Canadian Art and Artists. The Database has a large global audience, averaging 16 million annual hits from more than 100 countries.

For more information on the 12 on 12 Auction visit www.ccca.ca/auction or contact: Sybil Goldstein [sybil.goldstein@sympatico.ca] or 416.533.6059 Ester Pugliese [pugliese.ester@gmail.com]