James W. Bailey
Since 2003
Works in Reston, Virginia United States of America

PORTFOLIO (2)
BIO
Wind Painting" is a visual arts language of expression that physically collaborates with nature to reveal the naturalistic artistic creativity inherent in random acts of design caused by seasonal weather patterns. For example: the way a mass snowfall changes the design, appearance and function of a street.

In my home state of Mississippi there is a rural African-American practice know as bottle trees. African slaves brought with them their traditional beliefs in good and evil spirits. In the south their religious practices developed into the tradition of placing colorful bottles at the ends of branches of crepe myrtles. They believed that blue and green glass would lure evil spirits away from their homes and trap them inside the bottles. When I was a child growing up in Mississippi, my grandfather and I would visit a elderly black farmer who lived down the road from my grandfather
Discussions (3) Opportunities (1) Events (8) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

James W. Bailey


24 January 2005

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
James W. Bailey
Force Majeure Studios
2142 Glencourse Lane
Reston, VA 20191
Phone: 703-476-1474
Cell: 504-669-8650
Email: JamesWBailey@comcast.net
URL: http://www.jameswbailey.artroof.com/
CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?! - Project web site: http://jameswbailey.blogspot.com/

“CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?!”

EXPERIMENTAL MISSISSIPPI ARTIST PLANS HIGH-TECH PERFORMANCE ART PROJECT TO BLAST EMAIL HUNDREDS OF BANKRUPT COMPANIES AND THEIR FIRED, INDICTED AND/OR IMPRISONED FORMER CEOs ON APRIL FOOL'S DAY - DEMANDS ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS SUBMITTED FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY

(Reston, VA) “Can you hear me now?!” - At 12:01 am on April Fool's Day, artist James W. Bailey will click the send icon on his lap tap computer from a secret Wi-Fi hot spot in Reston, Virginia, and blast a caustic email containing this question, and potentially thousands more, to hundreds of bankrupt Information Technology companies and their disgraced former CEOs, demanding answers to this and other questions submitted from citizens from across the country.

An experimental photographer/artist from Mississippi who moved three years ago to Reston, Virginia (the central hub of the Dulles IT Corridor of Northern Virginia) Bailey explains the basis of his unique performance art project titled, “Can You Hear Me Now?!”: “I’m asking every interested American to email me a question they would like answered concerning the implosion of the high-tech sector. On April Fool's Day, I will direct an email letter that incorporates all the questions I receive to a list of bankrupt companies and their former corporate executives I have developed over the last 2 ½ years from extensive research of public records available from the SEC. Of course, I don’t expect to receive any answers to this blast email because these companies and their former CEOs, in a certain sense, no longer really exist. What I do hope is that this mass-communicative project will allow Americans to collectively vent their pent-up anger against the perpetrators of this mass-fraud that occurred in certain sectors of the American business community and declare their independence from this type of criminal behavior.”

Bailey calls his proposed event a Littoral Art Project. He describes Littoral Art as being artistic projects that take place outside the traditional boundaries of the institutionalized art world that seek to democratically involve people in the process of exploring a contemporary theme or current social concern.

“Since 1992, I have made a point of engaging in one Littoral Art Project per year,” says Bailey. “These projects are usually cloaked in secrecy and not promoted to the public. In most cases, I consider them to be a direct private line of communication between others and myself. With ‘Can You Hear Me Now?!’, however, I very much want to involve as much of American society in this dialogue as possible. What has occurred in some quarters of corporate America the last few years has been the biggest crime wave in the history of our country. To date, nobody, Martha Stewart and Ken Lay included, has really been held accountable. The jail time they and their corrupt cohorts have received is nothing compared to the money they ripped off and the lives, careers and retirement accounts they destroyed and bankrupted. This Littoral Art Project is designed to provide an opportunity for citizens to hold these companies and their corrupt former leaders accountable, maybe not criminally, but morally. All questions, and any answers received from any corporate ghosts willing to speak, will be posted on a dedicated web log to become the living legacy of this project.”

After moving to the Northern Virginia region in early 2002, Bailey immediately became aware of the reversal of fortunes for many tech companies in the region and found the inspiration for his project in the IT sector free-fall that specifically existed in the Dulles Technology Corridor: “Like many Americans, I became fascinated with watching corporations like Enron explode in the media. At the same time I was seeing the real-life fallout of the MCI/Worldcoms and PSI.nets bankruptcies and the negative impacts on the lives of real people and the economy where I live,” says Bailey. “I found it ironic that the very people who worked to build our nation’s enviable communications system could not seem to find a way to speak in one voice to the corporate owners of the system they built that ultimately betrayed them. I wanted to utilize technology in a Littoral Art Project that would allow for a unified voice to be heard, even if it is ignored and treated with a silent response. Celebrating the American tradition of declaring independence from the fools who oppress us, ‘Can You Hear Me Now?!’ is also conceived to be a belated April Fool’s joke played on those who profited mightily by trying to play the rest of us for fools.”

An award-winning experimental painter and photographer, Bailey has supplemented his art activities the last eleven years by conceiving and producing one Littoral Art project per year. He says he seeks to develop projects that have the potential to initiate an alternative understanding of an issue that interests him. Some of his projects have required a significant amount of research, planning, preparation and writing: “Eastern 304”, a 1994 project that explored the mysterious plane crash in 1964 of Eastern Airlines flight 304 into Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans, involved almost a full year of investigation and writing.

Bailey has also spontaneously developed projects contemporaneous with living history: In the project “911”, for example, Bailey, compelled by overwhelming emotion, left his job at a museum in Biloxi, Mississippi, strolled across the street to a hotel/casino, walked up to a pay phone in the hotel lobby, left the phone on the hook and calmly punched in the numbers 9-1-1 in that sequence 911 times in a row. Bailey says he was never confronted by any casino employees regarding this project, but was harassed repeatedly by casino visitors who wanted to use his phone to make their phone calls.

Since his relocation to the Northern Virginia region, Bailey has engaged in two of this Littoral Art Projects: In 2003 he conducted an unpublicized event called “The Beltway”. In this project Bailey photocopied three hundred sixty five separate black and white media images of the two African-American suspects that were arrested in the metro D. C. area sniper case and ran the photocopies through a paper shedder. The fragments were randomly dispersed from the Bailey’s car as he circled the Beltway on the first anniversary of the death of the first sniper victim.

In 2002 Bailey produced another unpublicized event titled, “The Metro”. In this project Bailey left a non-working cell phone on the Metro at Dupont Circle in Washington, D.C., with an attached SASE and note that read: PLEASE IMMEDIATELY RETURN THIS CELL PHONE TO THE ARTIST OWNER. The cell phone was delivered to the artist’s home by the United States Postal Service nine days later with no return address and no letter of explanation.

Although his Littoral Art projects are directed toward exploring the potential of dialogue, Bailey is quick to point out that his projects are not about the promotion of himself as an artist: “I have consciously avoided documenting many of these projects because I consider that too egotistical. I also do not want a photographic or video documentation of a living moment of history to become the static legacy of these events. What is important to me is to reach out to someone in an artistic capacity and to communicate with him or her in a vanishing moment of time. That vanishing moment, maybe to never be seen or recalled again, becomes its own history. The only documentation that will exist for ‘Can you hear me now?!’ will be the web log posting of the original blast email letter and any received responses.”

If you are interested in participating in the project “Can You Hear Me Now?!”, Bailey requests that you email him one question that you would like to see answered by a bankrupt IT corporation or former corporate officer concerning the meltdown of this information technology business sector to the following address: jameswbailey@comcast.net. Bailey’s original blast email letter and all responses will be posted starting April Fool's Day, April 1, 2005, on the following blog: http://www.jameswbailey.blogspot.com.

ARTIST’S BIO

James W. Bailey is an experimental artist, photographer and imagist writer from Mississippi. His art focus includes Littoral Art projects that explore the fleeting moments of cross-cultural communicative intersections; film projects, including the short film, Talking Smack; “Wind Painting”, a unique naturalistic art practice inspired by the vanishing Southern African-American cultural tradition of the Bottle Tree; street photography centered on the hidden cultural edges of inner city New Orleans life; and “Rough Edge Photography”, a hard-edge non-digital photographic style that celebrates the death of 35mm film through the burning, tearing, slashing and violent manipulation of chemically developed negatives and prints.

Bailey’s experimental imagist literary works include, The Black Velvet Smash and the Missing Gospel of William S. Burroughs, Cold Dark Matters, Eastern 304, Killing Film Noir, and, two books of poetry, The Despised American Edition and Southern Standard Time, all published by Force Majeure Press. Bailey has also written a full-length feature film screenplay, The Cold, a crime drama based on a true story set in New Orleans, which is currently in pre-production development.

JAMES W. BAILEY

LITTORAL ART PROJECTS

“Littoral describes the intermediate and shifting zone between the sea and the land and refers metaphorically to cultural projects that are undertaken predominantly outside of the conventional contexts of the institutionalized art world.” - Sentences on Littoral Art by Bruce Barber
Artist Statement

Since 1992 I have made a point of engaging in one Littoral Art project per year. These yearly artistic liturgical events have become for me a critical source of covert emotional inspiration. For the most part, these events are cloaked in secrecy and not promoted to the public. I have attempted with these projects to communicate, directly or indirectly, with a selected group of people and to offer an opportunity for them to respond. I consider theme to be, in most cases, a direct private line of communication between others and myself. In some cases, I am hoping for a public response, but not to the extent of promoting my involvement for any public relations value.

I try to conceive projects that have the potential to initiate an alternative understanding of an issue that interests me. Some have required a significant amount of research, planning, preparation and writing: “Eastern 304”, for example, involved almost a solid year of dedicated effort. Some were spontaneously developed contemporaneous with living history: “911”, for example. I was at work at the Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art in Biloxi, Mississippi, on September 11, 2001, and felt compelled by overwhelming emotion to walk across the street to the Beau Rivage Casino and complete this project.

I have consciously avoided documenting many of these events because I consider that too egotistical. I also do not want a photographic or video documentation of a living moment of history to become the static legacy of these projects. What is important to me is to reach out to someone in an artistic capacity and to communicate with him or her in a vanishing moment of time. That vanishing moment, maybe to never be seen or recalled again, becomes its own history.

LIST OF BAILEY’S LITTORAL ART PROJECTS

2004 - “ANTI-OPTIONS 05”, Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C.

The artist applied to curator Philip Barlow to be considered for the OPTIONS 05 exhibition of emerging artists sponsored by the WPA/Corcoran Association. When Barlow was fired as curator by the Board of Trustees of the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the artist initiated an online and real space art project, ANTI-OPTIONS 05, to hold both organizations accountable for their actions. ANTI-OPTIONS 05 was submitted by the artist for consideration in OPTIONS 05.

2003 - “The Beltway”, Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C.

The artist photocopied 365 separate black and white media images of the 2 African-American suspects that were arrested in the metro D. C. area sniper case and ran the photocopies through a paper shedder. The fragments were randomly dispersed from the artist’s car as he circled the Beltway on the 1st anniversary of the death of the 1st sniper victim.

2002 - “The Metro”, Washington, D. C.

The artist left a non-working cell phone on the Metro at Dupont Circle with an attached SASE and note that read: PLEASE IMMEDIATELY RETURN THIS CELL PHONE TO THE ARTIST OWNER. The cell phone was delivered to the artist’s home by the United States Postal Service 9 days later with no return address and no letter of explanation.

2001 - “911”, Biloxi, Mississippi

The artist left the phone on the hook and punched the numbers 9-1-1 in that sequence 911 times in a row from a touch-tone pay phone inside the lobby of the Beau Rivage Casino on September 11, 2001. No casino employees ever confronted the artist about this activity. However, several casino visitors repeatedly asked the artist what he was doing and several more strongly encouraged the artist to use another phone so they could use his phone to make their phone calls.

2000 - “Drive by Shootings”, New Orleans

The artist selected 36 street sites in New Orleans that were the scenes of 36 drive by shooting murders of African-Americans and randomly shot from inside his car 36 black and white photographs of 36 white individuals who happened to walk by. The photographs were later arranged in a “Rough Edge Photography” collage. Photocopies of the collage were made and mailed with an enclosed SASE to 36 random people selected from the white pages of the New Orleans phone book. The artist received written responses from 8 individuals. 1 person responded by including a cassette tape expressing her thoughts on receiving the collage.

1999 - “The River Card”, Louisiana

The artist drove the length of River Road, a petrol-chemical manufacturing corridor known as “Cancer Ally” that parallels the Mississippi River between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, and dropped 1 opened solid air freshener out of his moving car every 1-mile. A male driver in a pick-up truck who witnessed one of the air fresheners being thrown from the artist’s car stopped the artist. The pick-up driver had retrieved the air freshener from the road and returned it to the artist. The pick-up driver told the artist to not liter the road through his community or he would call the police.

1998 - “Killing Film Noir”, New Orleans

The artist visited 24 abandoned, renovated and converted buildings that were former inner city theaters during a 24-hour period of time and interviewed the first person he meet, 1 per hour, by asking 2 random questions selected from a hat. The 48 questions and answers from the 24 individuals were incorporated into an experimental imagist book titled, Killing Film Noir.

1997 - “Highway 61”, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee

The artist rented a car with a Louisiana tag and drove the length of Highway 61, the famous “Blues Highway”, from New Orleans through Mississippi to Memphis while playing loud gangster type rap music through a speaker attached to the top of the car. The artist was stopped by police once in Louisiana, three times in Mississippi, and once in Tennessee, and asked to turn the music down. None of the stops resulted in arrest.

1996 - “Dead Letter Box”, New Orleans and Arkansas

The artist mailed 100 letters with an enclosed SASE from New Orleans to randomly selected residents of the state of Arkansas that asked the following question: Is there anything about Bill Clinton that you would care to share with the rest of us before it is too late? The artist received one reply with no return address in which a photocopy of the artist’s original letter was marked in black ink that read in large bold script: NO!

1995 - “The Missing Gospel of William S. Burroughs”, New Orleans and Lawrence, Kansas

The artist visited the owners of the home that Williams S. Burroughs once owned on Walker Street in the Algiers neighborhood of New Orleans and asked to use their phone to call Williams S. Burroughs at his home outside Lawrence, Kansas. The artist interviewed Burroughs over the phone and this interview was incorporated into the experimental imagist book titled, The Black Velvet Smash and the Missing Gospel of William S. Burroughs.

1994 - “Eastern 304”, New Orleans

The artist gained access to medical, police and FBI investigation files into the mysterious 1964 plane crash of Eastern Airlines flight 304 that crashed into Lake Pontchartrain and was missing for several weeks before being discovered. The research was incorporated into an experimental imagist book titled Eastern 304. Copies of the book were mailed to 5 surviving family members of the 59 crash victims that the artist was able to locate. The artist received 3 letters of thanks and appreciation.

1993 - “The Bankers”, New Orleans

The artist visited a bank parking garage and taped 10 1$ bills on the outside driver’s window of 10 automobiles owned by the top 10 banking executives of the largest net asset bank doing business in New Orleans with a SASE and a note that read: PLEASE IMMEDIATELY RETURN THIS ONE DOLLAR BILL TO THE ARTIST. The artist eventually received back 3 of the 10 $1 bills.

1992 - “The Local Fish Wrap”, New Orleans

The artist dissected 10 copies of the Sunday edition of the Times-Picayune newspaper and separated each of the 10 newspapers into 2 sections: hard news and junk. The junk section included, but was not limited to, the following: classifieds, advertising, sports, style, travel, arts and cultural reviews, editorial columns, opinion columns, etc. The 2 sections generated from each newspaper were placed in 2 separate envelopes. Each junk envelope represented 99 per cent of the total weight of each newspaper and the hard news envelope represented 1 per cent of the total weight. The artist mailed 10 packages containing identical versions of the 2 envelopes to 10 randomly selected reporters from the Times-Picayune newspaper along with a note that read: WOULD YOU PLEASE IMMEDIATELY INVESTIGATE THIS MATTER AND REPORT ON IT TO THE PUBLIC? To this date no articles on this matter have ever appeared in the Times-Picayune newspaper.

EVENT

"Stealing Dead Souls" - "Rough Edge Photography" by James W. Bailey


Dates:
Sat Jan 01, 2005 00:00 - Sat Jan 01, 2005

01 January 2005

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“Stealing Dead Souls”
“Rough Edge Photography” by James W. Bailey

INVITATION TO THE MEDIA PREVIEW - Saturday, January 15, from 4:00 - 5:00 pm.

CONTACT:
James W. Bailey
(WPA/Corcoran Artist Directory - Page 370)
Force Majeure Studios
2142 Glencourse Lane
Reston, VA 20191
Ph: 703-476-1474
Cell: 504-669-8650
Email: JamesWBailey@comcast.net
Web site: http://jameswbailey.artroof.com

TO: ARTS AND CULTURE EDITOR

RE: “Stealing Dead Souls” - An Art Exhibition of “Rough Edge Photography” by Experimental Mississippi Photographer James W. Bailey.

EXHIBITION VENUE: Black Rock Center for the Arts. Exhibition runs from January 12 through February 11. Opening Reception on Saturday, January 15, from 5:00 - 7:00 pm.

(Reston, Va) Does photographing a person steal their soul? In certain tribal communities, this is a sincerely held belief; indeed, many Native Americans have long believed that photographs capture the souls of the living and imprison them within the photographic image. If taking a photograph of the living can steal souls, what happens if you photograph something dead or inanimate? Do the dead or non-living have souls? If so, can the souls of the dead be stolen by photographing them?

From January 12 through February 12, the Black Rock Center for the Arts in Germantown, Maryland, will present, “Stealing Dead Souls”, an exhibition of “Rough Edge Photography” by national award-winning experimental Mississippi photographer, James W. Bailey, which explores the concept of photography and its mystical ability to steal the life of the non-living.

Born and raised in Mississippi, Bailey explains the cultural basis for his spiritual beliefs about the power of photography to steal souls of the living and the dead: “I have a religious belief, probably inherited from my paternal Mississippi grandmother who was ¼ Choctaw Indian, and who was extremely distrustful of cameras, that photography has the magical power to capture a living element of life, a flashpoint of the soul if you will.”

Bailey explains the philosophy for his spiritual beliefs about photography: “The process of photographing a living person or ‘non-living’ entity, an object or building, for example, at a particular moment in time captures an element of life of that entity in a fixated way that would normally be lost to history. I believe that photographic images that have been taken of the living or the dead literally capture an element of the life force that presented itself in that moment that was captured.

When this living element, or the particle of the soul of the living or dead, if you will, is captured, it has the capability of re-generating itself in much the same way that certain life forms can lose a limb and regenerate it. The process of film photography literally steals a portion of life and can regenerate an aspect of that stolen fragment of life through the presented photograph itself.

Having lived in New Orleans for most of my adult life, I do believe in the life of the dead. The dead do live and have feelings and emotions, can experience pain and recall memories, and have the capability to consent. I also understand how difficult this might be for photographers like the paparazzi or Sally Mann or Andres Serrano or thousands of others to grasp.”

Morality in photography is a major concern expressed by Bailey. He believes that photographers must act in a moral fashion with respect for the people and objects they photograph: “This is an important issue for me. I don’t want souls drifting around in the universe angry at me for what I have done. Some photographers don’t care about the morality of photography: paparazzi, for example, photographing Princess Diana while she lay dying in the car in Paris, or Sally Mann photographing dead bodies without their permission from her on the grounds of a forensic research facility, or Andres Serrano photographing corpses without their permission from him. These are photographic acts perpetrated by reckless and immoral photographers who are more concerned about associating their names with their work and their work with fame and fortune than they are about the moral issues of life and death and the right of the living, as well as the dead, to consent to acts that portray them in art.”

Bailey freely admits that his photographs themselves steal the souls of the living or none-living objects he photographs. He says that he is constantly walking a tightrope with the ethical implications of what he photographs and how it might damage or adversely impact the souls of his subjects: “The great photographers, whether they know it or not, are photographers who have taken stolen elements of life through photography and have placed those living substances into a context where the photographically captured life force has been encouraged toward positive growth and appreciation by the people who see the photograph. It’s my goal as a photographer to aspire to this ethical principle of photography.”

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE:

Bailey’s experimental “Rough Edge Photography” technique involves exploring the “death of chemically developed negatives and prints” through the use of found 35mm source cameras he purchases in thrift stores. His process incorporates the violent manipulation of unexposed film, developed negatives and prints. Undeveloped film may be subjected to intense heat or pin pricks through the film canister. Developed negatives are burned, scratched, slashed or cut, as are the prints. In some cases, the original negative is melted onto the final print. The found camera that is used to shoot a particular narrative series of photographs is frequently smashed upon completion of the series. The subjection of Bailey’s film negatives and prints to his process, combined with the destruction of the source camera, results in a unique image that can not be duplicated: each “Rough Edge Photography” piece is an original work of art. The artist does not produce prints or authorized reproductions of his images.

ARTIST BIO:

Born in Columbus, Mississippi, in 1959, Bailey is a self-taught artist/photographer and an experimental imagist writer. His art focus also includes Littoral Art projects that explore the fleeting moments of cross-cultural communicative intersections; film projects, including the short film, Talking Smack; “Wind Painting”, a unique naturalistic art practice inspired by the vanishing Southern African-American cultural tradition of the Bottle Tree; and street photography centered on the hidden cultural edges of inner city New Orleans life. Bailey’s experimental imagist literary works include, The Black Velvet Smash and the Missing Gospel of William S. Burroughs, Cold Dark Matters, Eastern 304, Killing Film Noir, and, two books of poetry, The Despised American Edition and Southern Standard Time, all published by Force Majeure Press. He has also written a full-length feature film screenplay, The Cold, a crime drama based on a true story set in New Orleans, which is currently in pre-production development.

WHO:
The Black Rock Center for the Arts and experimental photographer James W. Bailey.

WHAT:
The Black Rock Center for the Arts in Germantown, Maryland, presents, “Stealing Dead Souls”, an exhibition of “Rough Edge Photography” by the experimental Mississippi artist, James W. Bailey. Bailey’s unique photographic style incorporates the violent scratching, slashing and burning of his prints and negatives.

WHEN:
Exhibition runs from January 12 through February 11. Exhibit is free and open to the public. An opening reception will take place on Saturday, January 15, from 5:00 - 7:00 pm.

WHERE:
The Black Rock Center for the Arts, 12901 Town Commons Drive, Germantown, Maryland 20874. For directions, see the Black Rock Center for the Arts web site at http://www.blackrockcenter.org/directions.htm

STEALING DEAD SOULS WEB SITE: http://www.stealingdeadsouls.blogspot.com

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OPPORTUNITY

League of Reston Artists - Call for Curated and Solo Art Exhibition Proposals 2005


Deadline:
Sat Oct 02, 2004 00:00

1 October 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
James W. Bailey
Board Member/Public Relations and Communications
League of Reston Artists (LRA)
WPA/Corcoran (2004/05 Artist Directory - Page 370)
2142 Glencourse Lane
Reston, VA 20191
Ph: 703-476-1474
Cell: 504-669-8650
Email: JamesWBailey@comcast.net
URL: http://www.leagueofrestonartists.org

LEAGUE OF RESTON ARTISTS (LRA) ANNOUNCES CALL FOR CURATED AND SOLO ART EXHIBITION PROPOSALS - MAJOR NEW VISUAL ARTS INITIATIVE IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA WILL PRESENT SELECTED EXHIBITIONS DURING 2005 AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX NORTHERN VIRGINIA CAMPUS IN RESTON VIRGINIA

(Reston, Va.)In a major new visual arts initiative for the Northern Virginia region, the League of Reston Artists (LRA) announces its first Call for Curated and Solo Art Exhibition Proposals for exhibits to be presented during its 2005 season at its sponsoring venue, The University of Phoenix Northern Virginia Campus, in Reston, Virginia.

LRA Board Member and spokesperson, James W. Bailey, says that individual artists, groups of artists, artist collectives, and independent emerging curators are invited to submit proposals for a curated exhibition by the postmarked deadline of Monday, January 17, 2005. Bailey also says proposals for solo artist exhibitions will be considered and are strongly encouraged from regional artists as part of this call.

“Those interested in submitting proposals are encouraged to visit the site at the University of Phoenix first to see how the space would work with their ideas,” says Bailey. “Interested curators and artists can download the proposal application form from our web site at http://leagueofrestonartists.org. Proposals should include a brief narrative exhibition statement, artist statements from key participants, a proposed budget, a proposed timeframe for the exhibition and relevant support materials, including representational slides, photographs, cd’s or videos. The LRA Board will select shows based on a representation of the proposed works included in the proposal. Interested applicants will need to keep in mind the public nature of the exhibition space. All attempts will be made to show work that is current and reflective of the community and the times.”

The League of Reston Artists (LRA) is an all volunteer not for profit 501(c)(3) organization established in 1973 that is open to metro Washington, D.C. area artists, photographers and individuals who are interested in the visual arts. The LRA strives to generate community enthusiasm and appreciation of the visual arts through regularly sponsored juried and judged exhibitions. According to Bailey this call for curated exhibition proposals is a new initiative of the LRA that is designed to stimulate a new level of energy and synergy among artists, curators and the community.

"This is truly an exciting new venture for the LRA and we hope this opportunity to help facilitate and develop the careers of emerging artists and emerging curators will help to further demonstrate the serious level of commitment the LRA has for advancing the contemporary arts in our community,” says Bailey. “We are also extremely grateful to the University of Phoenix Northern Virginia Campus for honoring us with their deep commitment as a supporting and sponsoring venue. We are excited to invite artists and curators within artist community to answer this innovative call to help fill a significant and beautiful gallery space at the University of Phoenix with engaging works of art during 2005.”

Bailey says that the LRA has for sometime wanted to expand its programming to accommodate the strengths, talents and long-term career interests of its growing membership: “The Board of the LRA recognizes that there are many tremendously talented artists and emerging curators in our region, as well as right here in Reston. We see this new initiative as a creative project designed to support and foster the development of a wide range of engaging art exhibitions for our community. If you are an artist or aspiring curator who has dreamed of curating a professional art exhibition, or staging a solo exhibit, this is your chance to put forward your best concept and idea. The LRA stands ready to help make your vision a reality.”

According to Bailey, each selected curator's role under this call for proposal will be to conceive, visualize and organize the art and artist(s) proposed for the selected shows. The exhibitions can be theme-based, media-based, retrospective or otherwise. Because of space limitations, all shows must be restricted to 2-dimensional works that meet the LRA’s framing and hanging standards policy. This policy can be reviewed on the LRA’s web site at http://leagueofrestonartists.org/faqs.htm. Individual artist(s) or photographers are encouraged to submit proposals for solo or group shows.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

The LRA’s Curated and Solo Art Exhibition Proposal 2005 application form can be downloaded from the LRA’s web site at http://leagueofrestonartists.org. Applications must be received with a postmarked deadline of Monday, January 17, 2005. Proposals should be mailed to: Curated and Solo Art Exhibition Proposal 2005, League of Reston Artists, P.O. Box 2513, Reston, VA 20195. There is no fee required to submit applications.

Proposals from Curators, Artist Organizations or Artist Collectives should consist of:

•A curator's statement (no more than two pages in length)
•An organizational fact sheet, if applicable
•A list of artists or works proposed, including number of art works
•Slides or photographs of representational art works from each artist(s) with a slide or photograph list
•A proposed exhibition budget
•Other relevant support materials that illustrate the vision of the exhibition
•Press on the artist(s)

Proposals from Artist(s) should consist of:

•An artist's statement - no more than two pages in length for each artist(s)
•A brief exhibition narrative
•5-10 slides or photographs of representational art works for each artist(s) with a slide list or photographs list
•A proposed exhibition budget
•Press on the artist(s)

GUEST CURATOR OR ARTIST(S) RESPONSIBILITIES

Selected guest curators or artist(s) are responsible for:

•Selecting art and developing the exhibition content and theme
•Developing an exhibition budget
•Installing and dismantling the show
•Hosting the opening reception; including food/beverages/supplies - an opening reception is not required
•Providing final price lists and labels for artwork and coordinating with the LRA any special programming, such as Gallery Talks
•Designing, developing and implementing a marketing and public relations plan for promotion of the exhibition in conjunction with the LRA
•All financial costs associated with the exhibition

ABOUT THE EXHIBITING VENUE - THE UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX NORTHERN VIRGINIA CAMPUS

Interested curators are strongly encouraged to make a site visit to the University of Phoenix Northern Virginia Campus in Reston, Virginia, prior submitting their proposals.

The University of Phoenix is located at 11730 Plaza America Drive, Suite 200, Reston, Virginia 20190. Office hours are Monday - Friday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm.

CALENDAR

Monday, January 17, 2005 - Proposals due with a postmarked date no later than January 15, 2005

Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - Proposal review meeting

Thursday, February 10, 2005 - Accepted proposals and 2005 exhibition calendar announced

Tuesday, February 15, 2005 - Declined proposals with SASE returned

MAIL PROPOSALS TO

All proposals must be received with a postmarked date of no later than Monday, January 17, 2005. Mail proposals to the following address and included a SASE if you desire a return of a declined proposal package:

Curated and Solo Exhibitions Proposal 2005
League of Reston Artists
P.O. Box 2513
Reston, VA 20195

PUBLIC CONTACT FOR MORE INFORMATION:
James W. Bailey
Board Member/Public Relations and Communications
League of Reston Artists (LRA)
WPA/Corcoran Artist Directory - Page 370
2142 Glencourse Lane
Reston, VA 20191
Phone: 703-476-1474
Cell: 504-669-8650
Email: JamesWBailey@comcast.net
URL: http://www.leagueofrestonartists.org

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About the League of Reston Artists (LRA):

The League of Reston Artists (LRA) is an all volunteer not for profit 501(c)(3) organization established in 1973 that is open to metro Washington, D.C. area artists, photographers and individuals who are interested in the visual arts. The LRA strives to generate community enthusiasm and appreciation of the visual arts through regularly sponsored juried and judged exhibitions. The LRA supports the Reston Community by sharing the varied talents of its membership through rotating exhibits in many local public and private buildings and offices. The LRA is dedicated to providing its 250+ members with opportunities for personal growth through meetings with guest speakers, demonstrations and critiques. The LRA also sponsors the Reston Photographic Society (RPS), a special interest society dedicated to promoting exhibit opportunities, as well as photographic based educational seminars and workshops, for photographer members of the LRA.

In addition, the LRA sponsors an annual scholarship program for local high school students in their senior year who demonstrate emerging talent and interest in pursuing collegiate art studies. In 2003, the LRA sponsored 10 exhibitions in 5 venues that featured more than 300 artists and more than 500 works of visual art. The LRA’s major supporting exhibition venues are: The Jo Ann Rose Gallery in the Reston Community Center at Lake Anne Plaza, The National Center Gallery of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Phoenix Northern Virginia Campus, and Walker and Company, all located in Reston, Virginia. For more information about the League of Reston Artists, please see our web site at http://www.leagueofrestonartists.org, call us at 703-476-1474 or email us at lraboard@leagueofrestonartists.org.


EVENT

Metro D.C. Premiere Solo Exhibition of "Rough Edge Photography" by Experimental Photographer James W. Bailey


Dates:
Mon Aug 16, 2004 00:00 - Sat Aug 14, 2004

EXHIBIT -August 30 - October 1. Opening Reception on September 11.

(Reston, VA) From August 30 through October 1, the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center of the Northern Virginia Community College Alexandria Campus will present a solo exhibition featuring the “Rough Edge Photography” of experimental Mississippi artist, James W. Bailey.

On September 11, 2001, Bailey began experimenting with a creative photographic style he has named, “Rough Edge Photography”. He refers to it as “Rough Edge” because his photographic work, unlike traditional photographs, literally has rough edges, surface abrasions and other caustic protrusions discernable to the eye and touch.

Bailey’s experimental technique involves exploring the “death of chemically developed negatives and prints” through the use of found 35mm source cameras he purchases in thrift stores. His process incorporates the violent manipulation of unexposed film, developed negatives and prints. Undeveloped film may be subjected to intense heat or pin pricks through the film canister. Developed negatives are burned, scratched, slashed or cut, as are the prints. In some cases, the original negative is melted onto the final print. The found camera that is used to shoot a particular narrative series of photographs is frequently smashed upon completion of the series.

“During the year leading up to 9-11, I found myself spending a lot of time revisiting childhood conversations I had in Mississippi with my father, a fireman. He used to reluctantly talk about his experiences of walking through burned homes and seeing the tragedy of family heirlooms that had been destroyed by a fire and dealing with the raw emotions of the victims of fires. When I was 11 years old, I experienced this myself when I participated in rescuing household effects from a burning house near my grandfather’s farm in Mississippi. A box that I pulled from the fire contained a collection of smoldering family photographs. The blistered and burned effects on these photographs left a remarkable and indelible impression on me,” says Bailey.

“For several years prior to 9-11, I had been shooting street life scenes in New Orleans in black and white. During that time I played by all the rules that most serious photographers are taught or learn. I played by the rules until I became bored with them. I felt that the ‘rules’ were constricting my vision. I was also feeling, at the time, the intense heat of the advancements in digital photography and sensed something dreaded in the air: the potential death of 35mm film. The horrific events of 9-11 brought a lot of scattered artistic ideas into absolute focus for me. After that terrible day, I knew that my photographic style would never be the same. ‘Rough Edge Photography’ is my attempt to discover beauty in the death of film. Whether we all realize it nor not, we are witnesses to the final days of the most intense and, in my opinion, the most mystical art form ever created by man: film photography.”

The subjection of Bailey’s film negatives and prints to his process, combined with the destruction of the source camera, results in a unique image that can not be duplicated: each “Rough Edge Photography” piece is an original work of art. The artist does not produce prints or authorized reproductions of his images.

Bailey’s small scale “Rough Edge Photography” images evoke the accidental decayed beauty of blistered film stills projected on a theatre screen when the movie reel stops and the film begins to burn. Known for his deeply personal narrative series that explore the forbidding depths of the inner city of New Orleans, many of his black and white source photographs are shot from the driver’s seat of his automobile as he drives the dangerous streets through brutally impoverished neighborhoods that most of the tourists on Bourbon Street never see. His burned, slashed and violently manipulated chemically developed negatives and prints provocatively capture the transitional movements of disposed people and mythical events through time. Reflecting a cinematic sensibility with his approach, his body of work resonates with an experimental energy and quality reminiscent of the avant-garde films of Stan Brakhage.

Born in Columbus, Mississippi, in 1959, Bailey is a self-taught artist/photographer and an experimental imagist writer. His art focus also includes Littoral Art projects that explore the fleeting moments of cross-cultural communicative intersections; film projects, including the short film, Talking Smack; “Wind Painting”, a unique naturalistic art practice inspired by the vanishing Southern African-American cultural tradition of the Bottle Tree; and street photography centered on the hidden cultural edges of inner city New Orleans life. Bailey’s experimental imagist literary works include, The Black Velvet Smash and the Missing Gospel of William S. Burroughs, Cold Dark Matters, Eastern 304, Killing Film Noir, and, two books of poetry, The Despised American Edition and Southern Standard Time, all published by Force Majeure Press. He has also written a full-length feature film screenplay, The Cold, a crime drama based on a true story set in New Orleans, which is currently in pre-production development.

WHO:
Margaret W. and Joseph L. Fisher Art Gallery of the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center, Northern Virginia Community College Alexandria Campus. Solo exhibition of the “Rough Edge Photography” of James W. Bailey.

WHAT:
The Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center of the Northern Virginia Community College Alexandria Campus presents, “The Death of Film”, a solo exhibition of the “Rough Edge Photography” of experimental Mississippi artist, James W. Bailey. Bailey’s unique photographic style incorporates the violent scratching, slashing and burning of his prints and negatives.

WHEN:
From August 30 - October 1. Exhibit is free and open to the public. An opening reception will take place on Saturday, September 11 from 1 - 3 pm.

WHERE:
Margaret W. and Joseph L. Fisher Art Gallery of the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center, Northern Virginia Community College Alexandria Campus, 3001 North Beauregard Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22311. For directions, see the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center’s web site at http://www.nvcc.edu/alexandria/schlesingercenter/gallery.html

PUBLIC CONTACT FOR MORE INFORMATION:
James W. Bailey
Force Majeure Studios
2142 Glencourse Lane
Reston, VA 20191
Ph: 703-476-1474
Cell: 504-669-8650
Email: JamesWBailey@comcast.net
Web site: http://www.jameswbailey.artroof.com


EVENT

Experimental Mississippi Photographer to Appear in the Peninsula Fine Arts Center Biennial 2004


Dates:
Mon Aug 30, 2004 00:00 - Thu Aug 05, 2004

(Reston, Va.) James W. Bailey, a native of Columbus, Mississippi, and resident of Reston, Virginia, has been announced as one of the juried finalists to participate in the Peninsula Fine Arts Center Biennial 2004. Organized by the Peninsula Fine Arts Center in Newport News, Virginia, this biennial exhibition of emerging national artists is considered by many visual artists and arts professionals in the state to be one of the most competitive and important surveys of contemporary art in Virginia.

Bailey’s experimental “Rough Edge Photography” piece, “Angel of Death”, was juried for inclusion in the exhibition by Carrie Przybilla, a curator since 1998 with the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia. Przybilla reviewed 972 entries by 338 artists and selected 123 works by 113 artists for the Biennial 2004. “I am thrilled to have to been invited to be in the Biennial 2004,” says Bailey. “To have my experimental style of film photography acknowledged by a curator of the stature of Ms. Przybilla and to have it presented in one of the premier contemporary art events in Virginia provide a further incentive to keep producing what I hope is meaningful and relevant new work.”

Being juried into the Biennial 2004 continues an impressive trend of national recognition of Bailey’s unique brand of photography by heavily credentialed curators and art critics. Earlier this year he was given an Honorable Mention Award for his “Rough Edge Photography” piece, “Circle Theatre - New Orleans,” at the Bethesda International Photography Competition, by William F. Stapp, the National Portrait Gallery’s first Curator of Photography.

In July Bailey was awarded the prestigious Albert J. Turbessi Award at the 47th Chautauqua National Exhibition of American Art for another of his “Rough Edge Photography” pieces, “Woman at the Tomb”, by the internationally renowned American art critic and art historian, Dr. Donald Kuspit.

Bailey explains that his “Rough Edge Photography” method results in the creation of one-of-a-kind images that cannot be duplicated or reprinted like a standard photograph from a negative. “In the case of ‘Angel of Death’, for example, I actually melted my original black and white negative and let the residue drip onto the burned print. The result is that this composite image of a cemetery angel I shot in St. Louis Number II Cemetery and its surrounding brick wall in New Orleans will be the only one that will ever exist.”

Bailey continues and explains the inspiration for and meaning of his creation selected for the Biennial 2004: “Well off the safe and beaten tourist path, St. Louis Number II Cemetery is located in an impoverished neighborhood bordered by the Iberville Housing Project to the south and the elevated I-10 Expressway on the north, and is less well known than its more famous older sister cemetery, St. Louis Number I Cemetery, the cemetery of legendary voodoo queen, Marie Leveau. Because of the isolation of the cemetery in a high crime neighborhood, and the fact that the police don’t patrol it as closely as the more popular St. Louis Number I, there is a very credible danger of visiting St. Louis Number II. You pretty much take your life in your own hands when you do so. St. Louis Number II has long held a fascination for me because it is so easily overlooked by the tourists and ignored by the locals. The dramatic irony of it being surrounded by an unimaginable level of poverty, crime, neglect and apathy has always interested me artistically. As an artist, I am interested in using my art to express a creative point of view on the subject of violence and crime in the inner city and how these issues affect the lives of innocent people.”

“The image of the wall surrounding St. Louis Number II was shot during a driving rain storm from inside my car. I burned a hole in the photo of the wall and layered this image over the burned, scratched and physically distressed image of the angel. I wanted to symbolize the mythological destructive power that the Biblical Angel of Death can bring forth if called upon. When you walk inside the walls of this cemetery located in this potentially dangerous neighborhood, you see these wonderfully peaceful and poetic statues, shrines and burial vaults. The view from outside the wall of the cemetery looks like a late 19th century prison located within a modern day drug-infested and crime-ridden neighborhood. You can’t help but feel your adrenaline level rise with the fear when walking in this wonderfully decayed, yet beautiful cemetery. It’s overwhelming. I wanted to create with this work a simultaneous sense of beauty and fear.”

Bailey believes that art has the potential, as well as the obligation, to stimulate a conversation about pressing social issues. He is particularly concerned about the issue of inner city crime and its affects on the lives of its victims in New Orleans, a place that he called home for more than twenty years, and a city that only a few years ago was known at the Murder Capital of the United States.

“This piece was meant to be a comment on the horrific nature of random brutal street crime and how far too often the worst of violence is isolated in neighborhoods that tourists don’t know about, or want to know about, and that locals know too much about and dare not visit. ‘Angel of Death’ is also a fantasy piece. The idea being that if the angels inside that cemetery were called upon, they could melt the prison like walls that surround them like butter and fan out across the city of New Orleans and deliver their death sentences with impunity against those who deserve it, the perpetrators of violent crime against the innocent, especially the innocent children who are all too frequently the victims of untimely and undeserved death. ‘Angel of Death’ is a work of art that offers the prayerful hope that peace and justice, which sometimes involves the defensive use of violence, will in the end, triumph.”

“Angel of Death” will be on exhibit at the Peninsula Fine Arts Center Biennial 2004 from September 4 through October 31. An opening reception will take place on September 11. The Biennial 2004 will be held at the Peninsula Fine Arts Center in Newport New, Virginia. For more information, see the Peninsula Fine Arts Center’s web site at http://www.pfac-va.org/.

Bailey’s “Rough Edge Photography” works, “Elysian Fields Avenue”, “Buddy Bolden Memorial”, “The Death of K & B” and “Cemetery Angel VI” will be on view through September 10 at the League of Reston Artists Contemporary Art Exhibition being held at the University of Phoenix Northern Virginia Campus in Reston. For directions, see the League of Reston Artists web sit at http://leagueofrestonartists.org.

Bailey’s first metro Washington, D.C. regional solo exhibition, titled, “The Death of Film”, will open August 30 through October 1 at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center on the campus of the Northern Virginia Community College in Arlington, Virginia. An opening reception will take place on Saturday, September 11 from 1:00 - 3:00 pm. For directions, see the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center’s web site at: http://www.nvcc.edu/alexandria/schlesingercenter/.

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Digital Photos Attached:
1.File name: ANGEL OF DEATH.jpg

For more information about the artist, please see the following web sites: www.jameswbailey.artroof.com or www.leagueofrestonartists.org/bailey.htm

Current and Future exhibitions featuring the “Rough Edge Photography” of James W. Bailey:

September 2004 - Group Exhibition - League of Reston Artists Contemporary Art Exhibition - University of Phoenix Northern Virginia Campus, Reston, Virginia.

September 2004 - Solo Exhibition - “The Death of Film” - Margaret W. and Joseph L. Fisher Art Gallery/Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center, Arlington, Virginia.

January 2005 - Solo Exhibition - “Burnversions” - Reston Community Center at Hunters Woods, Reston, Virginia.

ARTIST BIO:

James W. Bailey
(American, 1959 - )

James W. Bailey’s small scale “Rough Edge Photography” images evoke the accidental decayed beauty of blistered film stills projected on a theatre screen when the movie reel stops and the film begins to burn. Known for his deeply personal narrative series that explore the forbidding depths of the inner city of New Orleans, many of his black and white source photographs are shot from the driver’s seat of his automobile as he drives the dangerous streets through brutally impoverished neighborhoods that most of the tourists on Bourbon Street never see. His burned, slashed and violently manipulated chemically developed negatives and prints provocatively capture the transitional movements of disposed people and mythical events through time. Reflecting a cinematic sensibility with his approach, his body of work resonates with an experimental energy and quality reminiscent of the avant-garde films of Stan Brakhage.

Born in Columbus, Mississippi, in 1959, Bailey is a self-taught artist/photographer and an experimental imagist writer. His art focus also includes Littoral Art projects that explore the fleeting moments of cross-cultural communicative intersections; film projects, including the short film, Talking Smack; “Wind Painting”, a unique naturalistic art practice inspired by the vanishing Southern African-American cultural tradition of the Bottle Tree; and street photography centered on the hidden cultural edges of inner city New Orleans life. Bailey’s experimental imagist literary works include, The Black Velvet Smash and the Missing Gospel of William S. Burroughs, Cold Dark Matters, Eastern 304, Killing Film Noir, and, two books of poetry, The Despised American Edition and Southern Standard Time, all published by Force Majeure Press. He has also written a full-length feature film screenplay, The Cold, a crime drama based on a true story set in New Orleans, which is currently in pre-production development.

“Rough Edge Photography” - About the Technique

On September 11, 2001, artist James W. Bailey began experimenting with a creative photographic style he has named, “Rough Edge Photography”. He refers to it as “Rough Edge” because his photographic work, unlike traditional photographs, literally has rough edges, surface abrasions and other caustic protrusions discernable to the eye and touch.

Bailey’s experimental technique involves exploring the “death of chemically developed negatives and prints” through the use of found 35mm source cameras he purchases in thrift stores. His process incorporates the violent manipulation of unexposed film, developed negatives and prints. Undeveloped film may be subjected to intense heat or pin pricks through the film canister. Developed negatives are burned, scratched, slashed or cut, as are the prints. In some cases, the original negative is melted onto the final print. The found camera that is used to shoot a particular series of source photographs is frequently smashed upon completion of the series.

The subjection of Bailey’s film negatives and prints to his process, combined with the destruction of the source camera, results in a unique image that can not be duplicated: each “Rough Edge Photography” piece is an original work of art. The artist does not produce prints of his images.