Ed Shanken
Since 2003
Works in SEattle, Washington United States of America

BIO
Edward A. Shanken writes and teaches about the entwinement of art, science, and technology with a focus on interdisciplinary practices involving new media. He is a researcher at the University of Amsterdam and a member of the Media Art History faculty at the Donau University in Krems, Austria. He was formerly Executive Director of the Information Science + Information Studies program at Duke University, and Professor of Art History and Media Theory at Savannah College of Art and Design. Recent and forthcoming publications include essays on art and technology in the 1960s, information aesthetics, interactivity and agency, and the cultural implications of cybernetics, robotics, and biotechnology. He edited Telematic Embrace: Visionary Theories of Art, Technology and Consciousness (University of California Press, 2003). His second book, Art and Electronic Media was published by Phaidon Press in 2009. Full CV available on my website.
Discussions (16) Opportunities (8) Events (15) Jobs (1)
DISCUSSION

Who Sleeps? Jonathan Crary's "24/7"


PS. Also really appreciate the illustrations/vids/GIFS.

DISCUSSION

Who Sleeps? Jonathan Crary's "24/7"


Fantastic review. Thanks!

JOB

PHD FELLOWSHIPS 2011 - Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis (ASCA)


Deadline:
Wed Dec 01, 2010 21:08

Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis (ASCA) PHD FELLOWSHIPS 2011

Applications are invited for up to 6 PhD fellowships at ASCA, tenable from September 1, 2011, for a period of up to 4 years. These are fully funded staff positions. ASCA is a research school associated with the faculty of the humanities at the University of Amsterdam, with particular strengths in Media Studies.

Previous contact with ASCA or its members is not necessary, and international researchers are encouraged to apply. Application guidelines, as well as details of ASCA’s research concerns and projects, can be found on the institute’s website: www.hum.uva.nl/asca. Completed applications should be submitted as PDF files via email before January 15th, 2011, 1 p.m. (CET) to: Dr. Eloe Kingma, ASCA, asca‐fgw@uva.nl. Members of the selection committee are: Murat Aydemir, Josef Früchtl, Bart Garssen, Patricia Pisters, Kati Röttger. Other faculty and staff affiliated with ASCA include Mieke Bal, Richard Rogers, Geert Lovinck, Edward Shanken, and Marc Tuters.

For more details, see http://www.fgw.uva.nl/asca/object.cfm/objectid=CD7FD057-92D3-44A7-92BAF34A64310A09


DISCUSSION

The Postmedia Perspective


Part 6 of 6
From the above considerations, it should be becoming clear that new
media theory straddles medium-specificity (the “new properties” of
meta-media first proposed by Kay) and medium-generality (the “universal
machine” proposed by Turing.)  In my book, I argue that the history of
ideas and practices pertaining to computing and new media as a
technological and cultural field cannot be limited to modernist
conceptions of medium-specificity propounded by Krauss in her dismissal
of the post-medium condition.  It appears that neither specific nor
universal theories of media are sufficient for the task, just as
Domenico rightly suggests that neither new media theory nor contemporary
art theory are sufficient for the task of making sense of either NMA or
MCA.  To their benefit, new media discourses have a remarkable ability
to equally embrace universality and specificity, to say nothing of
remediation (Bolter and Grusin 1999), convergence (Jenkins 2006),
software studies, and a variety of other theoretical models, eroding the
binary opposition between specificity and universality.  The richly
textured conceptual and applied hybridity of NMA practices and
theoretical discourses offers great potential for reconfiguring the
terms of debate concerning experimental and avant-garde artistic
practices in the 21st century.
Ed Shanken, 17 January 2011
PS.  I
am chairing a panel on this topic at CAA in NYC on Fri, 11 Feb and
welcome Rhizomers to attend and participate in the discussion. See
http://conference.collegeart.org/2011/sessions/sessions.php?period=2011-02-11
Links:
Art Basel Conversation with Bourriaud, Weibel, Grey (19 June 2010):  
View: http://www.artbasel.com/go/id/mhv/
Download: http://www.artbaselvod.ch/videos/salon201006192.m4v
Contemporary
Art and New Media: Towards a Hybrid Discourse (draft overview essay of
current monograph)
http://artexetra.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/shanken-hybrid-discourse-draft-0-2.pdf
www.artexetra.com

DISCUSSION

The Postmedia Perspective


Part 5
Early in the excerpt, Domenico summons Manovich’s 1996 distinction between “Duchamp Land” and “Turing Land,” a distinction that he claims remain “valid to a point” despite considerable changes in both artworlds over 15 years.  As a matter of principle, I abhor such simplistic, binary oppositions, which do violence to the subtle layering of ideas and practices by flattening reality into sound-byte categories.  Moreover, Manovich’s characterization of Turing Land, as oriented “’towards new, state-of-the-art computer technology” misses what is conceptually most interesting about Turing’s (and Manovich’s!) theories of digital computing:  the idea of the universal machine.  Writing about the Dynabook (an early multimedia computing system) in their 1977 essay, “Personal Dynamic Media,” Alan Kay and Adele Goldberg claimed that “the computer, viewed as a medium itself, can be all other media.”  This “new ‘metamedium,’” as they called it, has “new properties” including “dynamic search” (i.e., random access), simulation, the ability to combine images, animations, and sound, and programmability.  Its content, they propose, “would be a wide range of already-existing and not-yet-invented media.”  Manovich credits these ideas in his later, more nuanced theories, which emphasize the unique properties of meta-media.