'Painting with Light' Spirit of Spring (2009)

This picture is a part of 'Spirit of Spring' - a Kodachrome transparency created by John Neville Cohen, winner of The London Salon Trophy 1967

Full Description

John Cohen invented his own unique form of 'Painting with Light' photography (a very different and original 'special effect' technique), without using any computer, darkroom chemicals, or expensive equipment to create his unique top international award winning transparencies. . . His technique is pure photography on film and has nothing to do with moving lights to make light graffiti, or of lighting specific parts of a scene during a long exposure. . . What it does involve is the photographing of projected images that surprisingly are not often projected on to a screen! . . John has found that the projector really lives up to its earlier known name - 'The Magic Lantern', as what can be done with projectors for photographers really is magical! . . One of his best known pictures was titled 'Spirit of Spring', this was the first ever picture taken on Kodachrome (transparency film) that included both a negative of a tulip and a positive image of a girl's portrait, all on the same emulsion! . . This photograph won The London Salon Trophy in 1967; it was then the first time a colour picture was deemed worthy of this much-coveted trophy, for it had only ever been awarded before for Black and White studies. . . John was also the youngest member to have won it. . . John explained that he starts with an idea and then experiments with various images, but sometimes something unforeseen happened, that sends him down a totally fresh route to create a very different picture than was originally planned, it is these ‘inspired accidents’ that have since turned out to be his very best works.

Work metadata

Want to see more?
Take full advantage of the ArtBase by Becoming a Member
Artist Statement

My aim is to create beautiful and inspiring pictures that also make quite a statement!

Related works


This artwork has no comments. You should add one!
Leave a Comment