[cloud.s]v1.1 (2009) - Jason Sloan

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From the artist's statement: Utilizing twitter [cloud.s] searches and aggregates all tweets/posts for the term "cloud" then redirects the live feeds into the projects virtual sky which can be viewed through your browsers "window".

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International Klein Blue (Google Monochromes) (2008) - Ryan Barone

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Image: Details from International Klein Blue (Google Monochromes), 2008

From the artist's statement: International Klein Blue (Google Monochromes) is a series of eleven monochromatic works created by conducting web searches for International Klein Blue, a color developed and patented in the 1950s by French artist Yves Klein. Created "as a means of evoking the immateriality and boundlessness of his own particular utopian vision of the world", IKB falls outside of the color gamut of modern computers rendering each digital reproduction inaccurate.

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Dissolving Space/Time part 1 (11/20/2008 - 12/13/2008) - Peter Nowogrodzki

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BEACON (2005-2008) - Thomson and Craighead

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Artist's statement: At 00.00hrs on January 1st 2005 an automated beacon began broadcasting on the web at http://www.automatedbeacon.net. The images above are documents of the gallery version of this work, which exists in two forms -- first made in 2006 as a live data projection and then in 2007 as a unique mechanical railway flap sign built by Solari of Udine in Italy. The development of the railway sign was funded by The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and British Film Institute (BFI)/Arts Council of England (North West)

In both instances, BEACON continuously relays live web searches as they are being made around the world presenting them back in series and at regular intervals as an endless concrete poetry. The beacon has been instigated to act as a silent witness: a feedback loop providing a global snapshot of ourselves to ourselves in real-time.

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I Wanted to See All of the News From Today (2007) - Martin John Callanan

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Artist's statement: Aggregating - daily - the front pages of all printed national newspapers from around the world into one place. (Currently includes 618 titles).


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From Rhizome's Artbase

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Interview with Daniel Pianetti and Renato Zulli of FAUND

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Image: FAUND #2, November 2008

FAUND is a magazine comprised of images found on the internet. For their first issue, which debuted last month, Switzerland-based editors Daniel Pianetti and Renato Zülli invited artists Peter Sutherland, Guy Meldem and Constant Dullaart to submit their finds. Their second issue comes out today, with images collected by artists Oliver Laric, Samuel Nyholm, Chris Coy, Sorryimissedyourparty, and Justin Kemp. As a seemingly natural extension to sites such as ffffound, the magazine spotlights the curatorial taste and direction of each individual artist. I asked Daniel Pianetti and Renato Zülli a few questions about their project via email. - Ceci Moss

How did you come up with the idea for FAUND?
We noticed that we were spending more and more time surfing for images on the Internet for pleasure, that's how we discovered sites where people can collect found images (ffffound, flickr, as-found...). We often focus our attention on the person who's finding, we think that you can understand a lot about this person judging by his finds. That's why we decided to create a paper magazine that highlights finders by inviting and spotlighting them as guests. Also, by printing the found images they become more durable.

How did you solicit artists to contribute?
Usually we choose the artists judging by their approach to general appropriation art. We simply ask them to send us any amount of image links, without imposing a specific theme on them. The only rule is that they can't submit images that they've modified. We select the guests after considering the creativity of their finds. Until now, we've had a good response because it's an unusual request.

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Image: FAUND #2, November 2008

Do you plan to continue publication on a monthly basis?
We never intended to ...

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Figga (2006) - Richard Wright

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Readymades by Constant Dullaart (2008)

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Google Stockholm by Yorit (2007)

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Image Search

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To say that the internet is teeming with data or overflowing with information would be both an understatement and an almost unquantifiable fact, given the ever-shifting shape of the net. But even if the web's state of being is hard to pin down, artist Richard Wright is intrigued by the concrete ways it has contributed to the evolution of communication. In his upcoming exhibition, "How to Talk to Images," at London's HTTP Gallery, the artist presents new work resulting from his residency with HTTP founders Furtherfield.org that continues his exploration into the pictorial history of language. An established film and video artist, as well as a pedigreed new media practitioner and theorist, Wright's show makes a statement about the way that we use images to speak and our new habits of "searching" for, rather than truly seeing visual images. He's created a database of 50,000 random internet images in order to create two works that play with the communicative structure and users' expectations with regard to online searches. The Internet Speaks forces users to skip through the files one at a time, letting the material's statements come to the viewer, rather than allowing them to impose meaning. Meanwhile, The Mimeticon uses the same database but requires viewers to find images not by searching for keywords but by browsing by visual similarities. The latter is positioned as a Baroque search engine, invoking a time of decadent formal experimentation and mechanical development. The show runs July 4th-August 3rd and coincides with the release of a monograph on the artist's work as well as a poster featuring an essay by Wright, illustrated with typefaces marking the evolution of the western alphabet. While his thesis on searching versus seeing implies a new short-term memory on the ...

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