08 Volcano Test (2010) - Borna Sammak

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Corpcore (2010) - Fatima Al Qadiri

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Boats * Cars * Dollars * Girls * Helicopters * Jewellery * Skylines (2010) - Thomas Traum

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A typology of rap videos and an attempt to construct the most generic Rap and R&B video out of many. Musical genres are always heavily codified and rap seems to be one of the most extreme ones, each video has similar if not identical subjects, the same light, the same cars, the same girls, the same dance moves etc. Through their likeness they seem to be almost ‘classic’, just as classic theater or opera.

-- DESCRIPTION FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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John Cage - 4'33" [May '68 Comeback Special RECON] (2010) - Dick Whyte

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A reconstruction [RECON] of John Cage’s infamous 4’33″ (silence) using 68 amateur and professional performances sourced from YouTube.

Originally via mediateletipos

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Sunset Solitaire (2005) - Joe Mckay

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[Video clip of "Sunset Solitaire" here]

In this performance/video I've written a program on my computer that lets me mix the sunset live. I have three gradient fields that I can constantly change with specially devised hardware. I then project from my computer onto a garage in a field behind my studio. I did this a few times - each time I went back to the studio and messed with the software, and each time I got a little better at the game.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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Required Reading

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But, also in 1977, David Bowie releases his single “Heroes.” He sings about a new brand of hero, just in time for the neoliberal revolution. The hero is dead—long live the hero! Yet Bowie’s hero is no longer a subject, but an object: a thing, an image, a splendid fetish—a commodity soaked with desire, resurrected from beyond the squalor of its own demise.

Just look at a 1977 video of the song to see why: the clip shows Bowie singing to himself from three simultaneous angles, with layering techniques tripling his image; not only has Bowie’s hero been cloned, he has above all become an image that can be reproduced, multiplied, and copied, a riff that travels effortlessly through commercials for almost anything, a fetish that packages Bowie’s glamorous and unfazed postgender look as product. Bowie’s hero is no longer a larger-than-life human being carrying out exemplary and sensational exploits, and he is not even an icon, but a shiny product endowed with posthuman beauty: an image and nothing but an image.

This hero’s immortality no longer originates in the strength to survive all possible ordeals, but from its ability to be xeroxed, recycled, and reincarnated. Destruction will alter its form and appearance, yet its substance will be untouched. The immortality of the thing is its finitude, not its eternity....

What happens to identification at this point? Who can we identify with? Of course, identification is always with an image. But ask anybody whether they’d actually like to be a JPEG file. And this is precisely my point: if identification is to go anywhere, it has to be with this material aspect of the image, with the image as thing, not as representation. And then it perhaps ceases to be identification, and ...

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Feedback (2009) - Brad Tinmouth

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Every song that begins with feedback from my iTunes playlist as of Oct 23rd 2009, 3:32

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Using, Using, Used

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Within the pages of Digital Folklore Reader, Olia Lialina, one of the book’s editors, refers to a claim by the social media researcher Danah Boyd, that some American teenagers identify as Facebook and others as MySpace—preferring a conformist and clean interface persona, or a rebellious and visually pimped one, respectively.

This book, co-edited by Dragan Espenschied, is by all outward appearances a MySpace, brimming with exuberant design elements culled from all over the net and reaching deep into online history. The dust jacket repeats a background image of a unicorn perched on a boulder at sunset under a meteor shower. Its reverse is wallpapered in 32 by 32 pixel gif icons representing the gamut of popular user-generated online imagery: cartoon characters, porno ladies, geometric designs, quotidian objects, flags, logos, landscapes and text, from WTF to FREE TIBET. One layer deeper, the cover and back of the book are white, or, probably (in RGB concept), nothing. The spine is also nude, showing off the motley sequencing of pages inside, the first and last of which are a flat, vibrant #00FF00 green, allusive of web-safe color and maybe of a green screen, primed for content to be transposed onto it.

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John Whitney - Matrix III - ASCII (2009) - skuzzyanimation

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An ASCII remix of John Whitney's 1972 work Matrix III by YouTube user skuzzyanimation.
Originally via Channel 53.

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General Web Content

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Inappropriate Soundtracks are videos consisting of well known movie scenes that have been edited to (in most cases) juxtapose the tone of the original scene. The scene is played out as normal, the only editing done to the clip is that a new song is inserted over the original to create lulz...According to the majority of the youtube videos they are inspired from the Something Awful forums...While being somewhat popular on the SA Forums it failed to become widespread across the internet. Only with the uploading of these videos to youtube and other online streaming sites (where it is extremely accessible) was it then able to spread and become a popular meme. There are also several blogs posting about the meme within the last year or so. Examples include: Living Read Girl , Filmsight , Kottke and The Inquisitr .There are no Google insights available as there are not enough searches yet. When typing Inappropriate Soundtracks into the search field it comes up with over 100,000 results. Interestingly, searching for Inappropriate Soundtracks Braveheart yields nearly 5 times more results.

-- FROM THE "INAPPROPRIATE SOUNDTRACKS" ENTRY ON KNOWYOURMEME.COM










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