Ikarie XB-1 and the Socialist Sci-Fi Space Ship

(0)

Still frame from Ikarie XB-1 (1963).

In his 1964 philosophical opus Summa Technologiae (the first English translation of which was published by The University of Minnesota Press last year), Polish author Stanisław Lem refers to the SF convention of "space 'ships,' including a brave 'crew'" as symptoms of a kind of "'reverse' nineteenth-century historical novel." "We can surely amuse ourselves like this," Lem wrote, "provided we remember we are only playing."

READ ON »


First Look: New Art Online

(0)

First Look: New Art Online is a monthly series of innovative online projects and new commissions curated by Lauren Cornell, former Rhizome executive director, currently New Museum curator of the 2015 “The Generational” Triennial, Museum as Hub, and Digital Projects.

This month includes a collection of 3D animations from Above Ground Animation

Featured artists include Barry Doupé, Kathleen Daniel, Ryan Whittier Hale, and Jacolby Satterwhite. Beyond Pixar, Adult Swim, or the default avatars of video games, these works explore possibilities for 3-D human forms. Their casts of improbable people are hatched out of personal history or emotion—through a longing for intimacy or an uncertainty for the future. Experimental and short-form, all the works were made to be viewed across various screening contexts, from the cinema to the gallery to the browser, and yet their structure reflects a sophistication with a range of digital media and programs, from Maya to 3D Studio Max.

Founded by the artist Casey Jane Ellison, Aboveground Animation is a video collection, an artist community, and a roving exhibition platform all in one. Since 2008, Ellison has collected animations and shared them at venues, most regularly at Ramiken Crucible gallery in New York, inspired, in part, by a desire to promote art with a shared aesthetic and also to make sense of her own emerging body of work.

Check out upcoming projects and commissions on the recently redesigned New Museum website!

LINK »


“Ghosts in the Machine” at the New Museum

(0)

 “Ghosts in the Machine” Public Programs July 18–September 30, 2012

“Ghosts in the Machine” will be accompanied by a series of public programs that explore the temporal and social dimensions of the relationship between art and technology. These include a conversation between artist Otto Piene and exhibition curator Massimiliano Gioni, a series of films that elaborate on the idea of “expanded cinema” and offer a counterpoint to the immersive environment of Stan VanDerBeek’s Movie-Drome (1963–66/2012) on view in the exhibition, and a performance by choreographer Tony Orrico that will test the limits of the artist’s body as a medium for drawing. A panel discussion at the end of September will open up the concept of “technological art” as well as invite critical reflection on the exhibition itself.


 

Otto Piene in conversation with Massimiliano Gioni 

Wednesday July 18, 7 p.m. 

Free to New Museum members, $10 General Public 

 

An evening devoted to an intergenerational conversation about art and technology between artist Otto Piene and exhibition curator Massimiliano Gioni. Otto Piene (German, born 1928) is a leading figure in kinetic art and one of the founding members of the group ZERO, initiated in 1957. Central to Piene’s art practice are connections between art, technology, and nature. In 1974, he succeeded György Kepes as the director of the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT where Piene established MIT as an important locus internationally for furthering the union of art and technology. Massimiliano Gioni is Associate Director and Director of Special Exhibitions at the New Museum, New York. He curated “Ghosts in the Machine,” with Gary Carrion-Murayari and he is currently organizing the 55th Venice Biennale opening in summer 2013.

 

Get Weird: Antipop Consortium

Friday July 27, 7 p.m.

$10 New Museum members, $12 General ...

MORE »


New Museum MakerBot Challenge

(0)

Showcasing the endless possibilities of the Thing-O-Matic, the New Museum MakerBot Challenge is open to the entire creative community. Embodying the New Museum’s mission of “New Art, New Ideas,” this interactive and experiential Challenge aims to push the concept of the “derivative,” by improving on or personalizing established design conventions. From the banal toothbrush to complex bicycle gears, how can 3D printing help to develop the world around us?

PRIZES

The winning design will be printed on a MakerBot Thing-O-Matic on display in the New Museum Store's window. The winning designer will receive a New Museum Deluxe membership ($400 value), a MakerBot Thing-O-Matic® Kit ($1299 value), and a special invitation to the New Museum MakerBot Challenge launch party.
Five runner-ups will have their designs printed by MakerBot and sent to them.

HOW TO ENTER

1. If you are not already registered, sign up for an account at Thingiverse.com
2. Upload your 3D files, and tag them with NewMuseumChallenge by October 31, 2011
3. In the description, write a statement about your design. What is the design a derivative of? How does it improve on or challenge existing design conventions?

RULES

1. Designs may be one single part or multiple parts that are each smaller than 4 x 4 x 4 ¾ in (100 x 100 x 120 mm) and printable on a MakerBot Thing-O-Matic.
2. Different parts can be made in white, yellow, orange, red, UV reactive red, UV reactive nuclear green, camping green, blue, black, and glow-in-the-dark.
3. The design may require multiple builds, however no more than three builds are allowed.

WHO'S IN THE JURY?

A team from MakerBot, Rhizome, and the New Museum will select the final designs. The jurors are looking for designs that utilize the unique ability of 3D printing to personalize and improve on the world around us.

 

READ ON »


The Festival of Ideas: Keynote by Jaron Lanier and more

(0)

The Festival of Ideas starts tomorrow with events at the New Museum, Cooper Union Great Hall, Bowery Poetry Club, and other venues around the city. Here are a few highlights from a rich program of events that address urban development, art, architecture, and technology. Many downtown organizations are working together to imagine the future city:

Thursday, May 5, 7:00pm
The Networked City
Keynote Address: Jaron Lanier
$10. The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 7 E. 7th St. (between 3rd and 4th Aves.)

Author of the best-selling You Are Not A Gadget: A Manifesto, Jaron Lanier has long been associated with Virtual Reality research and founded VPL Research, the first company to market VR products. He has served as Chief Scientist of Advanced Network and Services and as Lead Scientist of the National Tele- immersion Initiative, a coalition of research universities studying advanced applications for Internet2. He has recently served as Scholar at Large for Microsoft and currently acts as their Partner Architect. Purchase Tickets.

READ ON »