Weekend Clicking

(0)

“Secret Society,” installation view, CAPC, Bordeaux

  • Escape the Map, a Google Streetview interactive short sci-fi film made by Mercedes-Benz (via Kill Screen)
  • The phone hacking scandal exposed the failures of traditional institutions to maintain boundaries, distinctions and thresholds against the spectrallike entity of contemporary corporate media. - Sam Jacob in Domus on "The Architecture of Corporate Media"
  • N+1 editor Keith Gessen was arrested yesterday morning during the protest. The Awl lists other reporters who have been arrested during Occupy Wall Street.
  • “I think that speed is part of the innovation process. If ideas aren’t built on with a sense of urgency, time can pass you by.” Fast Company talks with DARPA director Regina Dugan...

 

READ ON »


Weekend Clicking

(0)

"I dropped my book and now I can’t read my book" (alex_lee2001) via The New Aesthetic

  • Agata Pyzik writes about Ostalgia in Frieze, brilliant from start to finish: "Just as Žižek has already published 30-odd books, in which he calls for a reevaluation of the idea of Communism, one might well ask: is this an infinite project, serving only the perpetual Ostalgie business? How many times is the same ‘Idea of Communism’ (the title of a book by Tariq Ali) being sold to us?"
  • This week's must read: The Social Graph is Neither by Pinboard's Maciej Ceglowski
  • Douglas Rushkoff at Occupy Wall Street
  • Social Media in the Age of Enlightenment (Open Culture.) "Europeans living in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries had to deal with their own version of information overload. Emerging postal systems, the proliferation of short letters..and the birth of newspapers and pamphlets all pumped unprecedented amounts of information — valuable information, gossip, chatter and the rest — through newly-emerging social networks, which eventually played a critical role in the French Revolution" ...

 

READ ON »


Weekend Clicking

(0)

Yogi Proctor, Canon (2011) via Border Studies

  • Leigh Alexander writes about Ian Bogost's Facebook satire Cow Clicker that unintentially gained an audience not in on the joke (It was supposed to be silly, insultingly simple, a vacuous waste of time, and a manipulative joke at the expense of its players-–in other words, everything Bogost thought that Facebook games like the Zynga-made hit). The article also discusses his series of "game poems" A Slow Year.
  • What CNN thinks hacking looks like (Betabeat)
  • The Movie Set That Ate Itself. Fascinating story of the ongoing (since 2006) filming of Dau in Ukraine, a massive built to scale undertaking even more absurd than Synecdoche, New York or Tom McCarthy's Remainder, with the "institute" taking strict measures to avoid an inauthenticity or anachronism. Guards even impose fines if you use words that are inauthetic to the time period ("Google" is now "Pravda," as in "Pravda it.") More on writer Michael Idov's Tumblr.
  • The Paris Review considers the "high art fanzine" with one exceptional example. In 1997, Johanna Fateman was the twenty-two year old author of the fanzine Artaud-Mania. (the syphilitic and schizophrenic Artaud, an enfant terrible of French arts and letters, was an unlikely idol for the feminist punk scene that Fateman had been a part of and was reacting against—post–Riot Grrrl publications that rarely ventured beyond subjects like the DIY music scene, grassroots organizing, and personal politics. Her appreciation for Artaud came through artists and writers like Nancy Spero and Kathy Acker. Like them, she was inspired by his fierce articulation of what Spero once termed a “sense of victimhood”; Fateman put it more bluntly when she wrote approvingly that Artaud was a “crazy bitch with male authority.”)
  • QR maleware (via Beyond the Beyond.)
  • A murmuration of starlings ...

MORE »


Weekend Clicking

(0)

Posters from the May 1968 protests are collected in Beauty Is in the Street, via The Paris Review

 

MORE »


Weekend Clicking

(0)

Still from Power Slave (1995) via FM Towns Marty

MORE »


Weekend Clicking

(0)

  • On Rock Paper Shotgun, an essay about the "bizarre, ambitious Spectrum game/band spin-off Frankie Goes To Hollywood – a game of pop music, terraced houses, sperm, Nazi bombers, Reagan spitting at Gorbachev and murder most foul." (via things magazine) 
  • Rachel Lord writes about the history of khaki for DIS magazine, "khaki was a Victorian military breakthrough. A technology, first and foremost, that gave the “Informal Empire” of Great Britain her second wind... When confronted with the realities of non-conventional, guerilla-style warfare in harsh climates against an ever-changing enemy, their primary issue was their inflexibility."
  • "Instagram is all about death. The 70s filters our parents used, artifacts of cameras we’ve never held. Nostalgia is the negation of death, it proves we are still living even without an identifiable future. Instagram is a machine for producing instant nostalgia, a ward against death...We are told that digital (over)sharing on social networks and the like is a natural human impulse, that we’re merely augmenting extant human needs, the need to communicate, to form social groups. But what if sharing is actually a mourning for what we have lost? Or, that which our lives are now too full to contain."James Bridle
  • Geoff Dyer's first column for the NYT on recursive summarizing in an academic book, not unlike "watching a rolling news program: Coming up on CNN . . . A look ahead to what’s coming up on CNN."
  • Hito Steyerl, Right in Our Face (e-Flux)
  • The fact is that if I've learned one thing in two years of studying how we think about the future, it's that the one thing that's sorely lacking in the public imagination is positive ideas about where we should be going. We seem to do everything about our future except try to design ...
  • MORE »


    Weekend Clicking

    (0)

     

    "Most sci-fi pic you will see today" - @bilder (Accompanying article:In South Korea, all textbooks will be e-books by 2015) via @bruces 

  • This morning I was reading an article about Bjork’s upcoming Biophilia project and it starts by saying that her whole career “has been a quest for the ultimate fusion of the organic and the electronic.” I relate to Bjork on this, and the juxtapositions in Antlers Wifi can be seen as part of a similar quest/search. - Rick Silva interviewed in Beautiful Decay
  • How The Internet Transformed The American Rave Scene In the early-to-mid-1990s, it was driven not by stars but a sudden collective sense that, as the Milwaukee rave zine Massive put it in every issue above the masthead, "The underground is massive." (via Kottke)
  • Lost languages as teen cyphertools (Futurismic) We’ve talked about social steganography before; for teenagers and other folk restricted to communicating in public and/or monitored virtual spaces, a shared coded language becomes a necessity for the communication of ideas which you don’t want the watchers (be they parents, governments or whatever else) to be able to parse..... [Now kids are] reviving nigh-extinct local languages as a way of carving out their own cultural spaces. Example: southern Chilean hip hop videos posted on YouTube in Huilliche, a language on the brink of extinction.
  • "We once believed we were auteurs but we weren't. We had no idea, really. Film is over. It's sad nobody is really exploring it. But what to do? And anyway, with mobile phones and everything, everyone is now an auteur." - Jean-Luc Godard (The Guardian) See all of Film Socialisme compressed to a two minute clip and released by the  filmmaker on Youtube.
  • People aren’t sure about what an image or object is anymore. They ...
  • MORE »


    Weekend Clicking

    (0)

    Stardust and Betelgeuse ESO, Pierre Kervella (LESIA, Observatoire de Paris), et al. via @esalor
  • Harrison Ford explains how he got the role of Hans Solo (Image Oscillite)
  • Performa Announces Next 4 Performa Commissions & First 2 Performa Premieres for Performa 11. Performa Commissions are Simon Fujiwara, Mika Rottenberg and Jon Kessler, Frances Stark, and Ming Wong. Performa Premieres will be presented by Robert Ashley and Boris Charmatz.
  • Last Year at Marienbad is 50. awarded the Golden Lion at the 1961 Venice Film Festival and nominated for an Oscar, but also branded an 'aimless disaster' by Pauline Kael; lauded by some as a great leap forward in the battle against linear storytelling and a worthy successor to Hoffmann, Proust, and Borges (Mubi Notebook)
  • On archaeology and the "philosophy of recording" Why do we choose to record the sites, monuments and artefacts that we do? Why do we select the units of information we choose to record about them? How have the things we record and the attributes recorded changed over time?
  • Japanese secret B-2 Stealth Bomber 1988 From Wikipedia (redacted):“From 1989 to 2004, the South Dakota Air and Space Museum located on the grounds of Ellsworth Air Force Base displayed the 10-short-ton ”Honda-Stealth”, a 60% scale mock-up of a stealthy bomber which had been built by Honda in 1988 for an advertising campaign. Although not an actual replica of a B-2, the mock-up was close enough to the B-2’s design to arouse suspicion that Honda had intercepted classified, top secret information, as the B-2 project was still officially classified in 1988. Honda donated the model to the museum in 1989, on condition that the model be destroyed if it was ever replaced with a different example. In 2005, when the museum received a B-1 Lancer for display (Ellsworth being a ...
  • MORE »


    Weekend Clicking

    (0)

    Adrien Missika, All sunset postcards available in Hawaii, (2011) Adrien Missika. via VVORK
  • Can we grasp this sense of ourselves as existing in time, part of the beautiful continuum of life? Can we become inspired by the prospect of contributing to the future? Can we shame ourselves into thinking that we really do owe those who follow us some sort of consideration, just as the people of the nineteenth century shamed themselves out of slavery? Can we extend our empathy to the lives beyond ours? - Brian Eno writing about the 10,000 Year Clock, in the essay from which The Long Now Foundation got its name. The clock is now under construction.
  • Questions Remain After Ai Weiwei's Release (Hyperallergic)
  • Tokyo-based, Senegal born, Kuwaiti artist Monira Al Qadiri's video Visual Violence, part of the bi-annual Aboveground Animation show, works off of the curt dialog and banal negativism (complete with the lethal injections and inner demons) that are common to a certain style of Japanese comics [with the] insertion of Qadiri’s own, more concentrated aesthetic, which often references Kuwaiti culture and traditions - V magazine. Interview with Al Qadiri. Vimeo page
  • Findr: Jacob Gaboury and Todd Shalom are using Grindr as a psychogeography research tool over Gay Pride Weekend. Interview on the project. It's not that we're rehabilitating a potentially problematic technology, it's that we are using the technology to find new ways to interact and create a shared, networked physical space. We're hoping to create new forms of contact between anonymous strangers, and in so doing create new ways of navigating the city.
  • Summer 2011 issue of Afterall themed around "the act of mapping, the land and locality."
  • 2011 Frieze Projects announced: The artists commissioned to create site-specific works for Frieze Art Fair 2011 are ...
  • MORE »


    Weekend Clicking

    (0)

    Photograph of Johannes Mehserle taken by Oscar Grant with his cell phone
  • Oscar Grant’s photograph of transit police officer Johannes Mehserle is rare: a portrait of the photographer’s killer. Unlike the recent photograph that a politician captured in the Philippines, Grant’s photograph, taken moments before Mehserle shot him in the back, was intentional. (It's Never Summer). See also: Radley Balko’s “The War on Cameras,” explaining misguided laws on "wiretapping" that make audio and visual recording of police officers illegal
  • LulzSec is still at it. Keep an eye on their Twitter account (and retweets).Who are they? Do they have your account info?
  • Focusing is about saying no - Steve Jobs at 1997 WWDC.
  • IBM turned 100 yesterday. Check out Errol Morris' Centennial Film.
  • DIY Weapons of the Libyan Rebels (The Atlantic)
  • Story behind the Vancouver riot kiss photograph (The Guardian)
  • Paola Antonelli, Geoff Manaugh, Alexis Madrigal, Bruce Sterling,Massimiliano Gioni, and others contribute to this month's issue of Domus with a special focus on the open-source movement in design.
  • Graham Harman explains speculative realism and object-oriented philosophy in an interview with Mute magazine
  • Internet in a suitcase prototype for dissidents abroad. Suitcase will rely on a version of "mesh network" technology, which can connect devices like cellphones or computers, creating a web without a centralized hub. Thus, each innocuous-looking suitcase acts as a mini-tower that can bypass the official network. (The Atlantic)
  • Stanislaw Lem's Solaris finally has a direct-to-English translation. Here it is on Audible
  • Ingmar Bergman directed soap commercial
  • New Jonathan Lethem story in the Paris Review, free to read online.
  • Not a parody: The Ayn Rand Guide to Romance (Open Culture)
  • I generally use “writer” [on my census form] because it’s more boring than “filmmaker”. I don’t want people to ...
  • MORE »