Artist Profile: Adriana Ramić

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The latest in a series of interviews with artists who have a significant body of work that makes use of or responds to network culture and digital technologies.

Adriana Ramić, The Return Trip is Never the Same (After Trajets de Fourmis et Retours au Nid, M. Victor Cornetz, 1910), 2014. Ebook, 82 pages. Installation view, Smart Objects, from the exhibition "Never cargo terminal has recently discovered the trembling hand of state secrets resounding oversold bounce child."

Lizzie Homersham: The work you exhibited in the recent show at Los Angeles' Smart Objects ("Never cargo terminal has recently discovered the trembling hand of state secrets resounding oversold bounce child," Jul 12 - Aug 8, 2014) was produced by retracing a series of ant pathways onto an Android Swype keyboard, then translating these movements into every available language. What prompted you to consider the smallest of animals in relation to your personal production of language on a smartphone?

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Anthony McCall Revisited

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In addition to Light Industry's recent restaging of Anthony McCall's 1975 Long Film for Ambient Light, they also curated a gallery of images related to the installation on their website. Here are a few images that highlight the process of creating a large-scale conceptual piece like this one:

Images courtesy of Light Industry from their Anthony McCall portfolio (2011)

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Highways Connect and Divide

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JODI, GEOGOO, 2008-2011 ongoing, screenshot. (From Foxy Productions)

Highways Connect and Divide,” an exhibition on display at Foxy Productions featuring work by Cory Arcangel, Tauba Auerbach, Bureau of Inverse Technology, I/O/D, JODI, Nam June Paik, Sterling Ruby, and Kerry Tribe, considers how the structure of information influences its transmission, reception, and legitimacy. Using the highway as a metaphor, the show constructs a dialog concerning the geography of transmission and the role of the artist in reimagining the systems that impact our lives.

Nam June Paik & Jud Yalkut, Beatles Electroniques, 1966-7. (Courtesy of Electronic Arts Intermix, New York.)

Highways, or channels of transmission are playfully interrupted in Nam June Paik's pioneering work Beatles Electroniques (1966-1972), where a TV broadcast of the Beatles’ A Hard Day's Night (1964) is disrupted by a magnet, rendering the familiar images into abstractions that reveal the underlying technological structure of the electronic signal. In a similar vein, though nearly forty years later, JODI's Geo Goo (2008-2011, ongoing) obstructs Google maps with failures and errors, stripping it of functionality and turning the ordered maps into chaos. The result is a disorienting and emphatic challenge to the technology’s authority and power. In both works, the technological architecture is given precedence over the intended distribution of content.

Kerry Tribe, North is West / South is East, 2001 (Photo: Mark Woods)

Maps are also the subject of Kerry Tribe's work North is West / South is East (2001), where the geography of Los Angeles is redrawn from memory by random individuals approached at the LAX Airport. The resulting maps, framed and mounted on the gallery wall, elevate the personal and unique realities over the legitimate cartographic version. Legitimacy and authorization are challenged further by Bureau of Inverse Technology's (BIT) video Bit Plane (1997), where ...

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Hot Throttle (2011) - Mark Johns (Doomlaser) and Jonathan Soderstrom (Cactus)

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[PLAY]

Hot Throttle is a new game on Adult Swim from indie game designers Mark Johns (Doomlaser) and Jonathan Soderstrom (Cactus) which features scantily clad men racing around, throwing knives and pretending to be cars.

Note: We mentioned some of Adult Swim's other games by Mark Essen here on the blog a few weeks ago.

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Selected Works from Tobias Madison's "Drawings" at Haus Konstruktiv in Zurich

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Originally via Contemporary Art Daily

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2010 Cliparts (2010) - Oliver Laric

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Projectors! Projectors! Everywhere! BYOB (Bring Your Own Beamer) NYC

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BYOB NYC animated GIF by Travess Smalley

Last Friday, I popped by Spencer Brownstone Gallery for B.Y.O.B. or Bring Your Own Beamer, a one-night-only exhibition organized by artist Rafaël Rozendaal. Artists were invited to bring their own projector (or "beamer" in European parlance) and project whatever they wish - videos, animated gifs, live streams, etc. Despite some problems with electricity and short-circuiting at the space - apparently 30+ projectors and laptops all running simultaneously tested the gallery's supply - the show was a hit and very fun. My favorite work was the live lobsters in a fish tank in the back room by Hayley Silverman and Charles Broskoski. A clip lamp "projected" the tank onto the wall behind it, so it was a creative interpretation of the show's theme. I think they even named them too - Tootsie? Wootsie? I can't remember. Anyway, here are some shots from last Friday. If you live in Los Angeles, lucky you, they'll be organizing another BYOB this coming week on November 19th at USC Gayle and Ed Roski MFA Gallery, info here.

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Lobster tank by Hayley Silverman and Charles Broskoski

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Artist Jeremy Bailey

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Jeremy Bailey's projection in situ

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Projection by Rene Abythe

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Projection by Dena Yago

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Projection by Sarah Weis

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Projection by Daniel (Luphoa) Chew

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Projection by Artie Vierkant

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Sea of laptops and projectors

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Ryder Ripps set up a "frame shop" where he sold a projection of a frame to other artists for 25 cents, in order for them to "frame" their works on the walls

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Example of Billy Rennekamp's work "framed" by Ryder Ripps

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Krist Wood's alchemic sculpture in the backroom

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Close-up of Krist Wood's sculpture

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A drawing machine by Jesse England

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The live feed from Jesse England's drawing machine projected on the wall ...

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Reversed Remediation: Evelien Lohbeck’s noteboek

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Evelien Lohbeck’s multimedia artwork noteboek (2008), has been selected as a Top Video in the Biennial of Creative Video, the showcase organized by the Guggenheim Museum and YouTube. 1 Noteboek exemplifies what I call ‘reversed remediation’. 2 This aesthetic strategy subverts Jay David Bolter and Richard Grusin’s notion of ‘remediation,’ which serves a historical desire for immediacy.3 Countering Marshall McLuhan’s fear of the narcotic state that the user of a medium can enter when becoming a closed system with the medium; reversed remediation offers a chance to wake up the viewer. 4 It creates a state of critical awareness about how media shape one’s perception of the world. (Art)works that employ reversed remediation destabilize remediation mechanisms, by making media visible instead of transparent. It makes critical awareness possible because it lays bare the workings of media instead of obfuscating them. The following discussion distinguishes between the theories of remediation and reversed remediation and applies this theoretical foundation to Lohbeck’s noteboek.

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Breathless (2008-Ongoing) - Jennie C. Jones

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Audiotape under UV glass, 16 x 20″ ea., 2008-2010 ongoing series. (from Kenny-G’s 1992 recording “Breathless”)

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Colour Chaser (2010) - Yuri Suzuki

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Colour Chaser detects and follows black line whilst it reads the colour and translate the colour RGB data into sound.



Originally via Pixelsumo

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