Good Copy Bad Copy (2007) - Andreas Johnsen, Ralf Christensen, Henrik Moltke

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a documentary about the current state of copyright and culture

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Sonic Outlaws (1995) - Craig Baldwin

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Within days after the release of Negativland's clever parody of U2 and Casey Kasem, recording industry giant Island Records descended upon the band with a battery of lawyers intent on erasing the piece from the history of rock music.

Craig "Tribulation 99" Baldwin follows this and other intellectual property controversies across the contemporary arts scene. Playful and ironic, his cut-and-paste collage-essay surveys the prospects for an "electronic folk culture" in the midst of an increasingly commodified corporate media landscape.

-- FROM UBU

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Manifestation (2009) - Murdim

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Totem 3 meters high - nine 19" lcd screens - nine Blu-ray disc players


Manifestation is a 20 minutes photography of the paris manifestation, the 29 of january 2009.It's a moving picture where you can see at the same time thousands of people all together and one one by one as they come closer. It's shot with ten hdv cameras then stitched together and broadcast on a totem made with 9 lcd screens.

-- FROM ARTBASE ENTRY

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It's Getting Hot in Here

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Image: Claudia X. Valdes, Revelation 2213, (2009) interactive networked video installation

Claudia Valdes refers to her work as "a rehearsal for the end of the world." The New Mexico-based artist employs photography, performance, video, interactive installations, and painting to address the subject of nuclear weapons. In her first solo exhibition, up now at Seattle's Lawrimore Project, she dials-in on the specific period of our nuclear history that followed 2001 (i.e. 9/11 and the ongoing war in Iraq), to trace the evolution of the bomb in the popular imagination and the rhetoric of holocaust and apocalypse in the present. Entitled "Ten Million Degrees," the exhibition includes many formal variations in different media, all of which initiate a tension between documentary, archive, and performance. By recreating nuclear test blasts in Turner-like watercolors and processing snapshots and video clips to channel radiation and frenzied vibrations, the artist stands between past and present in gauging the temperature of viewers' historical understanding. In fact, in her video installation, Revelation 2213 (2009), Valdes inserts viewers into public domain footage of nuclear tests through real-time chroma keying of gallery-goers' images. The artist performs her own escape fantasy in Minutes to Midnight, a ten-minute video that distends Super 8 footage of her public performances at New Mexico's Trinity Test Site. In the spirit of the science fiction genre her work recalls, Valdes traces the fears and dreams associated with technological evolution in the performance, which was repeated over a two-year period, thus sliding between historical event and historiography. These and other works are on view through March 14. Readers with a special interest in nuclear themes might also visit Joy Garnett's Bomb Project, which includes digitized historical records, images, and documentation of other artists' projects, including Michael Light's re-photographing project, 100 Suns ...

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1 Year of Archived Email (2005) - Cody Trepte

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In people, memory is the capacity to retain an impression of past experiences. In technology, memory refers to the parts of a digital computer that retain data for some interval of time. Computers now have the ability to save a lifetime of photographs, videos, audio and communications, changing the way that we reference personal memory. With this change, computers can archive and index memories in a way that we have never been able to do before. Computers have become machines for remembering. Using the most primitive form of digital storage, I have recorded all of the emails stored on my computer into thousands of punched cards. Each card contains fragments of communication layered one on top of another to form an analog representation of my collected digital communications. In the same way that information is stored on the computer, I have created indexes to reference the information. Each index is created by manually sifting through the information, word by word, creating unique directories of my personal communications.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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Interview with Mellotron Documentary Filmmaker Dianna Dilworth

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Reproduction, appropriation, and automation are three major ongoing concerns within contemporary music and art. It’s strange then that relatively few people know about two mid-20th Century musical instruments that embodied all of these methods: the Chamberlin keyboard and its offshoot, the Mellotron, the first instruments built on taped samples of the sounds of others.

In Mellodrama: The Mellotron Documentary, filmmaker Dianna Dilworth takes measure of the many players in the story behind these unruly sound machines, whose very existence ultimately shaped much of popular music. The film is a study in the unpredictability of innovation, and how each extension of the same technology can conflict with the intentions of those that came before it.

The film profiles the creators as well as the instruments themselves, spotlighting their influence on later musical tools and approaches, as well as their overwhelming influence on a wave of pop stars, from the Beatles to 70s progressive rock bands. Mellodrama premiers February 16 at the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival in Missoula, Montana.

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Interview with Goldin+Senneby

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"The boys from Sweden are not really interested in Kate's habits, her lifestyle, the clothes she wears; they're interested in Headless Ltd., a company they want to know more about. And they're interested in a book which they think Kate is writing about them, a book called Looking for Headless."

These lines are from the first chapter of Looking for Headless, a serial novel that artists Goldin+Senneby commissioned from author K.D. The chapter was originally published as the work of Kate Dent, an employee at the offshore consultancy Sovereign Trust, but Goldin+Senneby retracted their claim about the author's identity after some prodding from Sovereign's lawyers. By chapter three, the legal confrontation had already become part of the story, and the lawyers' communication was just another of the many real-world facts woven into the fabric of the novel.

Goldin+Senneby's project Headless (2007-ongoing) uses the idea of investigating the Bahamas-based company Headless Ltd as the basis for a wide-ranging study of how events are remembered, created, and communicated in the production of narrative. The seedy glamour of offshore finance provides an effective context; it is fertile for plots of mystery and intrigue, and the huge sums of virtual money floating offshore make an apt metaphor for the symbols and ideas that compel people to action and set events in motion. Goldin+Senneby further extend the financial trope by adopting corporate practices to make Headless, outsourcing the project's many texts, events, and performances to specialists. For their exhibition at the Power Plant in Toronto, on view through February 22, Goldin+Senneby commissioned documentary filmmakers to interview an investigative journalist about how to make a documentary about investigating Headless Ltd. They also hired a curator and a set designer to devise a didactic display introducing viewers to the characters of the novel Looking for Headless.

A system as rich and recursive as Headless simultaneously generates both questions and answers to them. In previous interviews the artists have responded to questions about the project exclusively in the form of quotes from its various parts. For the interview below, however, they produced some new statements, perhaps mindful of the opportunity to recycle them in future incarnations of Headless. - Brian Droitcour

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National Film Board of Canada's New "Screening Room"

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The National Film Board of Canada launched Screening Room last week. The site hosts over 700 films produced by NFB, which are now available for streaming and sharing. During the span of their 70 year history, the National Film Board of Canada have been a major force in independent Canadian cinema, underwriting a number of forward thinking documentaries, animations, and short films. NFB have been especially supportive of experimental and emerging film practices, a fact that becomes apparent when perusing their collection. (More recently, the organization began supporting moving image on other platforms as well. mobiDOCS: Confessions in a Digital Age, co-produced by NFB, is a series of short documentary films made especially for mobile phones.) See below for a few choice selections from Screening Room.



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bodega list (2009) - Jeff Sisson

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"I would like every bodega in New York City to have a homepage."


"Bodegas on the bodega list come from off-premise liquor license listings on the New York State Liquor Authority website. Bodega images, locations, and names are gleaned by humans using the "IS THIS A BODEGA?" tool. Once a bodega has been verified, it appears on the list and on the red dot map."

LAUNCH

More work by Jeff Sisson

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Inauguration Overload

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Move over holographic reporting! With Obama's inauguration coming up tomorrow, many news organizations are experimenting with innovative ways to address the event. Here's a short list:

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Image: Design by Paula Scher, from the upcoming edition of the Guardian G2

  • Graphic Designers and Illustrators Reinterpret Past Obama Speeches for the Guardian's G2 Section
    In tomorrow's issue of the Guardian G2, a number of acclaimed designers and illustrators will reimagine select excerpts from Obama's previous speeches. Click the link to CR Blog above for a quick preview.
  • CNN's "The Moment"
    In an effort to "...capture the most detailed experience of a single moment ever," CNN will assemble photos sent in by users into one epic photosynth. Almost every major news source seems to be inviting photo submissions from attendees, but CNN are clearly trying to put themselves ahead of the pack by assembling them all into 3D.
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    Image: I Hope So Too

  • NY Times Interactive's I Hope So Too and Inaugural Words: 1789 to the Present
    These two projects from the talented interactive team at the NY Times illustrate the public's future aspirations for the presidency and the vocabulary used in inaugural speeches. Over 200 people shared their hopes for the Obama presidency in interviews conducted for I Hope So Too, a section that groups these recordings by theme. Visitors can agree with the statements made, or alternately offer up their own hopes, it theirs aren't represented. Inaugural Words: 1789 to the Present depicts, in a tag cloud for each president, the most-used words from previous inaugural addresses.
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    Satellite image of the United States Capitol

  • The Inauguration, as viewed from space.
    The only non-news organization on this list, the company behind the GeoEye-1 satellite, which generates images for Google Maps and Google Earth ...
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