Zoë Salditch
zoe.salditch@rhizome.org
Works in New York, New York United States of America

BIO
Your favorite internet friend. <3
Co-founder & Director of Artist Relations @ Electric Objects.
Formerly @ Rhizome and Eyebeam Art + Technology Center.


Stories from the New Aesthetic


Last week, Stories from the New Aesthetic, part of Rhizome's New Silent Series, took place at The New Museum of Comtemporary Art. 

The New Aesthetic is an ongoing research project by James Bridle, investigating the intersections of culture and technology, history and memory, and the physical and the digital. At a panel at South by Southwest this past March, Aaron Straup Cope, Ben Terrett, James Bridle, Joanne McNeil, and Russell Davies discussed ideas related to the project, which sparked a series of responses and ideas from artists, writers, and theorists across the web.

For this event, Bridle was joined by McNeil and Cope again to share their stories related to these ideas.

READ ON »


The Download: Angela Detanico and Rafael Lain


Screenshot of Pond Type interface

This month on The Download featuring an interactive software piece by Brazilian artists Angela Detanico and Rafael Lain.

Pond Type (2012) transforms the QWERTY keyboard into a hauntingly beautiful musical instrument for digital poetry. Inspired by Brazilian concrete poet Augusto de Campos's "Pulsar," the artists Detanico and Lain designed a ripple typeface for an exhibition of the poet's work for the Elisabeth Foundation for the Arts. For The Download, they combined the typeface with sound to create an interactive version of Pond Type.

After selecting any text or poem, the viewer is instructed to type slowly and wait for each word to vanish before typing the next. By deliberately slowing down the urge to type quickly, the artists delay gratification and encourage careful listening.

The Download gives a first look to great art for Rhizome members. Start your own digital art collection by becoming a member today.

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The Download: Kristin Lucas


Screenshot of The Sole Ripper in Google SketchUp, courtesy of the artist

This month The Download features Kristin Lucas's digital book The Sole Ripper (2012).

The Sole Ripper is a digital book containing a 1:132 scale architectural view of a fictional pedestrian roller coster modeled for an empty lot in Manhattan discovered by Lucas on Google Maps. The architectural plan arrives fragmented and out of order, given its shape through a process of software conventions and workarounds. It is a visual corollary to the download process in which files are broken down into packets and transmitted over internet pathways from one computer to another, and reconfigured at their final destination. Only, Lucas leaves the task of file reconfigurability open to the viewer, and opts for an alternative view that features a 352-page vertical drop and bears likeness to a filmstrip. Recalling Luis Borges's hyperreal map that was as large as the empire itself from "On Exactitude in Science," Lucas's plan for The Sole Ripper is too large to see in its entirety even when reassembled.

The Download gives a first look to great art for Rhizome members. Start your own digital art collection by becoming a member today.

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Kitchen Table Coders Presents: Learn to Code From an Artist Workshop


Kitchen Table Coders Panel Discussion from Rhizome on Vimeo.

Last Friday, Rhizome hosted a panel discussion on code literacy in the arts including Amit Pitaru of Kitchen Table Coders; Vanessa Hurst of Girl Develop It and Developers for Good; Jer Thorpe, artist and educator; Sonali Sridhar of Hacker School; and moderated by Douglas Rushkoff, educator and author of Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commands for a Digital Age.

Kitchen Table Coders workshops in the New Museum Theater

Following the panel, Rhizome hosted five Kitchen Table Coders-style workshops Saturday afternoon in the New Museum Theater. Twenty-five eager coding novices came to get a crash course in Processing with some of New York City's most talented programmers; Amit Pitaru, t3db0t, David Nolen, Jer Thorp and Rob Seward. The Kitchen Table Coders host intimate workshops around a kitchen table in their Brooklyn studio on any topic the attendees choose. 

Jer Throp introducing Processing to his students

Participants learned the basics in Processing, an open source programming language for visual art.

t3db0t demonstrating Arduino

More advanced students had the opportunity to sit down with t3db0t to take their Processing skills to the next level with Arduino to create interactive electronic objects.

Thanks again to all the panelists, Vanessa Hurst (Developers for Good), Sonali Sridhar (HackerSchool), Amit Pitaru (Kitchen Table Coders) and Jer Throp (NYTimes and ITP), and our moderator codevangelist Douglas Rushkoff for a stimulating conversation about code literacy. And big thanks to Nick Hasty, Director of Technology for Rhizome, who was instrumental in making this event happen. I look forward to organizing more code and hacker workshops in the future!

 


Introducing the Rhizome Tumblr


 

We're pleased to announce that Rhizome is now on Tumblr! Over the last 16 years, Rhizome has amassed an incredible collection of images, videos, and more from memebers of our community. On RHIZOME DOT ORG we we'll bring to light this great content and more right to your dashboard.

READ ON »



Discussions (17) Opportunities (6) Events (2) Jobs (6)
DISCUSSION

Rhizome Today: Conversations at the Edge (of a Square)


Good Today post. Impressed with Scott's knowledge of panel manufacturing.

I'm biased towards the 9:16 ratio or "deep portrait" as Andrew Benson likes to call it. ( ^-^)

JOB

Android, iOS and Rails Engineers


Deadline:
Sat Nov 08, 2014 12:05

Location:
New York City, New York
United States of America

We're a small team of six based in New York City. We're hiring for a handful of specific roles, but if you find this project fascinating, please don't hesitate to reach out.

Android Engineer — We're looking for someone to lead the development of the EO1 Android-based operating system, in addition to a mobile Android app. You should have a few years of experience working with Android.
You'll work closely with the team building the integrated computer for EO1, to maximize graphics performance.
Most of the work will be at the application layer, but you should have some comfort digging into the lower level stuff. We're a small team, so it will be important for you to have a keen eye for user experience as well.

Product Engineer — The person in this role will build the web and mobile web Rails applications that support the Electric Objects community and Store, where users will discover, share, buy and display artwork.
You should have spent at least a few years working on websites, and ideally spent some time building community software.
You've probably worked on side projects before. That's what this is like, except all the time.

iOS Engineer — Lead the development of the iPhone and iPad applications that help users discover, collect and display artwork on their EO1.
We're pretty sure that most people will control what appears on their EO1 with their phone, so this is a pretty important platform for us. We're looking for someone with a few years of iOS development under their belt.

Other notes:
The pay and equity are competitive
We'll help the right person relocate

Interested? Introduce yourself to hello@electricobjects.com


DISCUSSION

Nail Art: From lipstick traces to digital polish


The emoji at the end was icing on the cake.

Also, thought it would be good to add that for femme lesbians there is a nail polish code or "femme flagging," since we're on this track about queerness and nail art.

http://www.xojane.com/beauty/femme-flagging-manicure
http://stuffqueerpeopleneedtoknow.com/2012/04/30/flagging-for-femmes-and-other-people-who-need-an-alternative-to-the-back-pocket/

OPPORTUNITY

The Exquisite Contraption (February 2014)


Deadline:
Mon Dec 16, 2013 00:00

The Exquisite Contraption (February 2014)

Flux Factory invites artists, designers, engineers, hackers, and makers to collaborate on an elaborate, exquisite corpse-style Rube Goldberg machine that will span multiple rooms and floors throughout Flux Factory to accomplish a simple chore.

Inspired by Rube Goldberg’s cartoons that depict overly complex machines; chindōgu, the Japanese art of “unuseless” inventions; and the growing popularity of producing these objects and machines as an art practice; The Exquisite Contraption will result in a massive, interactive, kinetic sculpture that is activated once a week for the duration of 2014 to perform its task.

Participants will work together to collectively identify the machine’s task and individually build pieces of the chain reaction. The final contraption will be created from a wide array of materials and methods and become a long term addition to Flux Factory’s architecture. In an age of consumerism that worships the invisible and efficient, The Exquisite Contraption is an experiment not only in the spectacle of visible automation and the aestheticization of externalities, but in living daily life surrounded by a conspicuous machine.

Tell us your idea for a task or chore to be automated and a section you would like to build (max 1 page). Applications are due December 16th to exhibitions@fluxfactory.org and applicants will be notified by January 6th.

http://www.fluxfactory.org/news/open-call-2014-exhibition-season/


OPPORTUNITY

Emoji Art & Design Show at Eyebeam


Deadline:
Fri Nov 08, 2013 00:00

Location:
New York, New York
United States of America

The Emoji Art & Design Show surveys the spread of emoji through popular culture with an art exhibition and Emoji Pop-Up Market.

WHY AN EMOJI ART & DESIGN SHOW?

In today’s visually oriented culture, which increasingly communicates through images rather than text, emoji comprise a kind of “visual vernacular,” a language that conveys humor, ambiguity and personality as well as meaning.

This visual form of communication isn’t necessarily new—from cave paintings, to hieroglyphics, to religious and mythological symbols encoded in traditional painting and sculpture, we’ve been communicating through images since the dawn of mankind—but its dominance in culture today, especially among millennials, seems to indicate a greater shift in our approach to self-expression.

SUBMIT YOUR WORK

Emoji are everywhere. The little pictographic characters from Japan have become one of our favorite causal modes of communication and their influence has permeated popular culture and personal expression.

If you’re an artist or designer working with emoji, send us your work. We’re looking for a diverse array of interpretations and appropriations of the emoji that exist both on and offline. The show welcomes new and existing works from a variety of mediums ranging from net art, to painting and sculpture, video and performance.

Designers looking to sell their emoji-themed products should apply to participate in the pop-up market. Please note that all pop-up market vendors should be local to NYC or able to staff their own booth.

Learn more & submit your work now through November 8th.

Presented by:
Forced Meme Productions
Eyebeam

Official Media Partner:
Mashable



SAVED WORKS (11)