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DISCUSSION

Touching Gravity 2/Tilt by Caryn Heilman


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Turbulence Commission: Touching Gravity 2/Tilt by Caryn Heilman (LiquidBody MediaDance),
with music by Nana Simopoulos
http://turbulence.org/works/touching\_gravity
Needs Flash player and core duo Mac or PC

Touching Gravity 2/Tilt is an interactive, aerial videodance superimposed on a composited image of two rivers in the towns of North Adams and Adams, Massachusetts. Part of the Networked Realities: (Re)Connecting the Adamses project, the two New England towns are (re)connected through a colorful, fluid, multilayered dance that incorporates the movement of the natural landscape from each town, seen through the “difference” blend mode of the Flash interface.

Users can create and save their own versions of the dance by determining the order and timing of five different clips. Periodically, additional clips will be added so that both the dance and the user experience may evolve.

Composer and instrumentalist Nana Simopoulos has contributed five tracks to accompany the five dance clips; each piece is played on a single instrument representing a different continent. Together, they form a single composition that is layered over the sounds of the two rivers, providing the listener with the ability to remix the musical textures.

Touching Gravity 2/Tilt is part of the larger project Networked Realities: (Re)Connecting the Adamses www.turbulence.org/networkedrealities -- a collaboration between Greylock Arts www.greylockarts.net and Turbulence.org www.turbulence.org -- that includes four commissioned networked art works that will all eventually be housed on the commissioned website www.newadams.es. Touching Gravity 2/Tilt will also be part of an interactive, site-specific series at Topia Arts Center (Adams) that looks at the idea of tilting angles of perception to reveal new possibilities.

Touching Gravity 2/Tilt is a 2008 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., (aka Ether-Ore) for its Turbulence web site. It was made possible with funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Additional support was provided by Frank and Barbara Peters through the Medici Circle award at the University of California at Irvine.

BIOGRAPHIES

Caryn Heilman danced for the Paul Taylor Dance Company for ten years before founding her own company, LiquidBody media, movement and dance. With PTDC, she performed on the world’s most prestigious stages and acted as a cultural ambassador for the United States in India, China, Turkey, Hungary and Japan. She is featured in the Emmy-nominated documentary film, Dancemaker. With LiquidBody, performance highlights include Jacob’s Pillow, MA; Dixon Place, NY; amphitheaters in Greece; a spa in Italy; and the Electronic Festival in Warsaw, Poland. Having received a foundation of choreographic tutelage from Paul Taylor - a master of American Modern Dance -- Caryn is diving into more experimental territory, focusing on the fluid systems of the body and choreographic structures that include audience interaction, multimedia, live music and aerial dance.

Caryn has received scholarships from the American Dance Festival, Alvin Ailey and is currently on fellowship at the University of California at Irvine completing her MFA in Dance and Technology. For the past three years, she served on the Professional Advisory Committee of the Dance Notation Bureau. LiquidBody’s second home is in the Northern Berkshires in Adams, MA where Caryn is Artistic Director of Topia Arts Center, a green arts and education center in development. www.liquidbody.org

Nana Simopoulos draws her music's melodic color from the map of world cultures. She artfully blends sounds and textures from around the world. Indian sarangi master Ustad Sultan Khan accompanies her on her last two releases, “After The Moon” and “Daughters Of The Sun” (Na Records), #1 on the NAV New Age and World radio charts. Nana’s first album, “Pandora’s Blues,” won critic’s choice from DOWNBEAT Magazine. Nana has been commissioned by numerous dance companies, such as Joffrey Ballet, American Dance Festival, Ballet Hispanico, North Carolina Dance Theater; and by former Pilobolus choreographer Peter Pucci. She has also written for film and theater, including “An Absolute Mystery,” which premiered at La Mama, and “American Dreams, Lost and Found.” www.nana.net

OPPORTUNITY

Networked: a (networked_book) about (networked_art)


Deadline:
Mon Dec 15, 2008 00:00

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Networked: a (networked_book) about (networked_art)
A Juried International Competition
Call for Proposals
Deadline: December 15, 2008
http://turbulence.org/networked

Five writers will be commissioned to develop chapters for a networked book about networked art. The chapters will be open for revision, commentary, and translation by online collaborators. Each commissioned writer will receive $3,000 (US).

Networked Committee:

[list]Steve Dietz (Northern Lights, MN)
Martha CC Gabriel (net artist, Brazil)
Geert Lovink (Institute for Network Cultures, The Netherlands)
Nick Montfort (Massachusetts Institute for Technology, MA)
Anne Bray (LA Freewaves, LA)
Sean Dockray (Telic Arts Exchange, LA)
Jo-Anne Green (NRPA, MA)
Eduardo Navas (newmediaFIX)
Helen Thorington (NRPA, NY)[/list]

Networked Partners:

[list]New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. (NRPA)
http://new-radio.org
newmediaFIX
http://newmediafix.net
LA Freewaves
http://www.freewaves.org/
Telic Arts Exchange
http://telic.info[/list]

A networked book is an open book designed to be written, edited and read in a networked environment." - Institute for the Future of the Book

Networked Goals: (1) to commission five chapters and publish them online using Wiki/blog technology to enable the public to revise, update, debate and translate them; (2) to present public forums to publicize the online book and solicit participation in its development.

Networked Objectives:

[list]• To develop and publish an online, trans-disciplinary book that will address recent artistic developments made possible by computers, networks, and mobile connectivity
• To present the book in an open, participatory and social form
•To document:
[list]a) the collapse of the traditional distinction between artist, art work and audience
b) the shaping of creative practice that is open, contingent and participatory
c) the building of virtual communities which, in the words of Howard Rheingold, "becomes inevitable wherever computer mediated communications technology becomes available to people anywhere." (The Virtual Community, 1993)[/list][/list]

We invite contributions that critically and creatively rethink how networked art is categorized, analyzed, legitimized -- and by whom -- as norms of authority, trust, authenticity and legitimacy evolve.

Networked proposes that a history or critique of interactive and/or participatory art must itself be interactive and/or participatory; that the technologies used to create a work suggest new forms a “book” might take.

We hope to spark a conversation between researchers and practitioners, curators, artists, and academics in the fields of art (music, sound, dance, e-lit, visual art …), architecture, convergence, mapping, urbanism, games, sociology, visualization, cultural studies, and environmental studies.

In keeping with the transdisciplinary nature of the book, authors may consider, but are by no means limited to, themes such as:

[list]• cyberspace and identity
• ubiquitous computing -- surveillance, politics, and privacy
• avatars, wearables, bioart and embodiment
• collective storytelling, audio narratives and sound art
• virtual worlds, mixed realities
• locative media -- place, mobility, augmented reality
• massively multiplayer online games -- networked play
• responsive architecture and relational environments
• social networks
• nomadism, psychogeography, and the city
• tactical media -- performance, agency and activism
• open source and crowdsourcing
• Originality, copies, remix, mashup[/list]

All papers will be reviewed by our international committee.

Commissioned chapters, as well as contributions by collaborators, will be subject to the Creative Commons License Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0/Unported:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Once the chapters are published online, registered users will be able to revise, add to, and translate the existing texts. There is no end date for the project. When Networked has attracted substantive participation, we will consider publishing a print version of the project, which may itself be updated over time.

GUIDELINES:

Submissions must be based on original, unpublished research. They should include:

[list]1. Name, address, URL, email and one page CV of author.

2. A 1000 word proposal that should be accompanied by an abstract of no more than 250 words and a list of keywords to indicate the subject area of the chapter. [Each of the commissioned chapters will contain text, images, videos, and/or audio.]

3. Three networked writing samples. Samples may include a blog entry, a Wikipedia article the applicant worked on extensively, or samples from any other participatory project (send URLs).[/list]

Acceptable Submission Formats: Either a web page (send url in an email) or a single text document (send as an email attachment)

Final chapters must be no less than 5,000 words.

Submissions and Questions should be sent to: jo at turbulence dot org

IMPORTANT DATES

Deadline for Proposals: December 15, 2008
Notification: January 31, 2009
Deadline for Complete Chapters: April 30, 2009
Online Publication Date: July 1, 2009

Funded by the National Endowment for the Arts.


DISCUSSION

Networked: a (networked_book) about (networked_art)


image
Networked: a (networked_book) about (networked_art)
A Juried International Competition
Call for Proposals
Deadline: December 15, 2008
http://turbulence.org/networked

Five writers will be commissioned to develop chapters for a networked book about networked art. The chapters will be open for revision, commentary, and translation by online collaborators. Each commissioned writer will receive $3,000 (US).

Networked Committee:

[list]Steve Dietz (Northern Lights, MN)
Martha CC Gabriel (net artist, Brazil)
Geert Lovink (Institute for Network Cultures, The Netherlands)
Nick Montfort (Massachusetts Institute for Technology, MA)
Anne Bray (LA Freewaves, LA)
Sean Dockray (Telic Arts Exchange, LA)
Jo-Anne Green (NRPA, MA)
Eduardo Navas (newmediaFIX)
Helen Thorington (NRPA, NY)[/list]

Networked Partners:

[list]New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. (NRPA)
http://new-radio.org
newmediaFIX
http://newmediafix.net
LA Freewaves
http://www.freewaves.org/
Telic Arts Exchange
http://telic.info[/list]

A networked book is an open book designed to be written, edited and read in a networked environment." - Institute for the Future of the Book

Networked Goals: (1) to commission five chapters and publish them online using Wiki/blog technology to enable the public to revise, update, debate and translate them; (2) to present public forums to publicize the online book and solicit participation in its development.

Networked Objectives:

[list]• To develop and publish an online, trans-disciplinary book that will address recent artistic developments made possible by computers, networks, and mobile connectivity
• To present the book in an open, participatory and social form
•To document:
[list]a) the collapse of the traditional distinction between artist, art work and audience
b) the shaping of creative practice that is open, contingent and participatory
c) the building of virtual communities which, in the words of Howard Rheingold, "becomes inevitable wherever computer mediated communications technology becomes available to people anywhere." (The Virtual Community, 1993)[/list][/list]

We invite contributions that critically and creatively rethink how networked art is categorized, analyzed, legitimized -- and by whom -- as norms of authority, trust, authenticity and legitimacy evolve.

Networked proposes that a history or critique of interactive and/or participatory art must itself be interactive and/or participatory; that the technologies used to create a work suggest new forms a “book” might take.

We hope to spark a conversation between researchers and practitioners, curators, artists, and academics in the fields of art (music, sound, dance, e-lit, visual art …), architecture, convergence, mapping, urbanism, games, sociology, visualization, cultural studies, and environmental studies.

In keeping with the transdisciplinary nature of the book, authors may consider, but are by no means limited to, themes such as:

[list]• cyberspace and identity
• ubiquitous computing -- surveillance, politics, and privacy
• avatars, wearables, bioart and embodiment
• collective storytelling, audio narratives and sound art
• virtual worlds, mixed realities
• locative media -- place, mobility, augmented reality
• massively multiplayer online games -- networked play
• responsive architecture and relational environments
• social networks
• nomadism, psychogeography, and the city
• tactical media -- performance, agency and activism
• open source and crowdsourcing
• Originality, copies, remix, mashup[/list]

All papers will be reviewed by our international committee.

Commissioned chapters, as well as contributions by collaborators, will be subject to the Creative Commons License Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0/Unported:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Once the chapters are published online, registered users will be able to revise, add to, and translate the existing texts. There is no end date for the project. When Networked has attracted substantive participation, we will consider publishing a print version of the project, which may itself be updated over time.

GUIDELINES:

Submissions must be based on original, unpublished research. They should include:

[list]1. Name, address, URL, email and one page CV of author.

2. A 1000 word proposal that should be accompanied by an abstract of no more than 250 words and a list of keywords to indicate the subject area of the chapter. [Each of the commissioned chapters will contain text, images, videos, and/or audio.]

3. Three networked writing samples. Samples may include a blog entry, a Wikipedia article the applicant worked on extensively, or samples from any other participatory project (send URLs).[/list]

Acceptable Submission Formats: Either a web page (send url in an email) or a single text document (send as an email attachment)

Final chapters must be no less than 5,000 words.

Submissions and Questions should be sent to: jo at turbulence dot org

IMPORTANT DATES

Deadline for Proposals: December 15, 2008
Notification: January 31, 2009
Deadline for Complete Chapters: April 30, 2009
Online Publication Date: July 1, 2009

Funded by the National Endowment for the Arts.

DISCUSSION

"Interview: Jeff Talman" by Peter Traub


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Interview: Jeff Talman
By Peter Traub
Networked_Music_ Review

Jeff Talman’s sound installations focus on notions of “self-reflexive resonance”, often using no other sound source than the natural ambient resonance of the installation site. His works also have a strong visual component, owing to his dual backgrounds in music and the visual arts. His latest work, “A Play of Flows” premiers on October 23, 2008 at the Galleria Mazzini in Genoa, Italy. Talman was awarded a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship in Sound Art in 2006 and was a recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts Award in Computer Arts in 2003. He currently resides in Manhattan.

Due to the nature of his pieces, Talman does not provide sound samples on his website - the pieces are simply too site-specific to experience in any other way than first-hand. As such, we will only be providing photos and discussion with this interview.


Peter Traub: Before you began creating sound installations in the mid 1990s, you were a more ‘traditional’ computer music composer and musician. Could you discuss how you made the transition into sound installation work? Was there a particular experience of a space or place that pushed you in this new direction?

Jeff Talman: First, let me thank you very much for your interest in my work and this opportunity to go into your well-thought through questions. Many thanks also to Networked Music Review and Helen Thorington and Jo-Anne Green. I’ve found that interviews can really help tremendously because they put me as an artist outside of myself, so new or different slants to the work may become available. It’s is a very welcome kind of refreshment. Read more.

In case you haven’t visited the site recently, don’t miss Peter Traub’s interview with Karen Van Lengen.

All of the Networked_Music_Review Interviews can be found here.