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DISCUSSION

Interview: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller


Interview: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller
by Peter Traub
Networked_Music_Review: http://turbulence.org/networked_music_review
September 20, 2007

Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller create multimedia pieces that combine
aspects of sculpture, cinema, sound installation, and short-story fiction.
Installations such as "The Paradise Institute" (2001) use forced perspective
and a three-dimensional sound track to create the illusion that one is
sitting in a large theater. Their 'sound walks' and 'video walks' are
immersive pieces that use common consumer technologies, such as iPods and
video cameras, to create experiences that blur the line between experienced
reality and narrative fiction. Their works are exhibited internationally;
their exhibit "The Killing Machine and other stories" will arrive at the
Miami Art Museum on October 15, 2007. Read the complete interview here:
http://tinyurl.com/2nossl

Jo-Anne Green, Co-Director
New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc.: http://new-radio.org
New York: 917.548.7780 . Boston: 617.522.3856
Turbulence: http://turbulence.org
Networked_Performance Blog: http://turbulence.org/blog
Networked_Music_Review: http://turbulence.org/networked_music_review
Upgrade! Boston: http://turbulence.org/upgrade
New American Radio: http://somewhere.org

DISCUSSION

Upgrade! Boston: Daniel C. Howe + Aya Karpinska


< Daniel C. Howe + Aya Karpinska >
<< Call for Video Sharing Entries >>
<<< Up Next >>>

< Daniel C. Howe + Aya Karpinska >
Digital Language: Poetry Beyond the Printed Page
Moderated by Nick Montfort
http://turbulence.org/upgrade/archives/09_20_07DHandAK.htm

DATE: September 20, 2007
TIME: 7:00-9:00 pm
VENUE: North 181, Massachusetts College of Art, 621 Huntington Avenue,
Boston.
[Ask the security guard at the main desk in the Tower Building how to get
there] [Green Line "E"]

Immersed as we are in digital media, we often overlook the centrality of
written language in our experience of the world -- not only as the 'content'
of digital media, but also in the processes that facilitate it. In digital
literature, the written language of code generally operates on several
interconnected levels. Though we tend to focus on its role as a container
for displayed 'literary' content, code also exists as a static and legible
'text', in addition to its active function as instructions for the computer.
Which of these levels is most relevant to our aesthetic experience of
digital literature? Can we 'understand' any one level without exploring the
others? With these questions in mind, we will present examples from recent
work that leverages computational techniques to explore new possibilities in
digital literature; from procedural recombinations, to dynamic physical
interfaces, to three-dimensional environments for literary experimentation.
About the Speakers :
http://turbulence.org/upgrade/archives/09_20_07DHandAK.htm

<< Call for Video Sharing Works >>
http://turbulence.org/upgrade/archives/VideoSharing_call.htm

Upgrade! Boston is now accepting submissions for "Video Sharing Boston." We
are interested in short experimental fragments, castoffs, and/or remixes;
provocative, contemporary ideas; and works that challenge preconceptions and
generate dialogue. Boston area artists only. Extended Deadline: September
30, 2007

<<< Up Next >>>

Azra Ak

DISCUSSION

"Nothing Happens" Live Now! Call for Participation


Nothing Happens" Live Now! Call for Participation
Nurit Bar-Shai, with Rich Miller, Yishay Schwerd, Zach Lieberman and John
Schimmel
http://turbulence.org/Works/nothingHappens/
OK Center for Contemporary Art: CyberArts 2007
Ars Electronica Festival, Linz, Austria
September 6 - October 14, 2007

"Nothing Happens" is a networked online performance in which the viewers
work together to make a series of objects tip over. The performance consists
of three acts, which are centered on staged environments - a high shelf, a
deserted corner, and a cluttered tabletop. Each scene contains a central
protagonist, respectively: a cardboard box, a clear pint glass full of
water, and a wooden chair. In all three acts, web-enabled physical devices
controlled by the viewer's clicks make these objects tip over. In addition,
each change is recorded as a snapshot-image, creating not only an archive of
the work, but a collective creative result: a stop-motion-animation
sequence, in which viewers can browse through the entire history of the
performance both during it and after its conclusion.

Nothing Happens received a Prix Ars Electronica Honorary Mention in the
Hybrid Art category.

"Nothing Happens - a performance in three acts" is a 2005 commission of New
Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., (aka Ether-Ore) for its Turbulence web
site. It was made possible with funding from The Greenwall Foundation.
Additional support was provided by the OK Center Linz, the Israeli Cultural
Foreign Ministry, ITP/NYU and 3rd Ward.

Jo-Anne Green, Co-Director
New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc.: http://new-radio.org
New York: 917.548.7780 . Boston: 617.522.3856
Turbulence: http://turbulence.org
Networked_Performance Blog: http://turbulence.org/blog
Networked_Music_Review: http://turbulence.org/networked_music_review
Upgrade! Boston: http://turbulence.org/upgrade
New American Radio: http://somewhere.org

DISCUSSION

Turbulence Commission: "Superfund365, A Site-A-Day" by Brooke Singer


September 4, 2007
Turbulence Commission: "Superfund365, A Site-A-Day" by Brooke Singer
http://transition.turbulence.org/works/superfund/

"Superfund365, A Site-A-Day" is an online data visualization application
with an accompanying RSS-feed and email alert system. Each day for a year
"Superfund365" will visit one toxic site currently active in the Superfund
program run by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). We begin the
journey in the New York City area and work our way across the country,
ending the year in Hawaii. In the end, the archive will consist of 365
visualizations of some of the worst toxic sites in the U.S., roughly a
quarter of the total number on the Superfund's National Priorities List
(NPL). Along the way, we will conduct video interviews with people involved
with or impacted by Superfund. Content changes every day so be sure to visit
often or use the subscribe tools to have content delivered to you.

CREDITS

"Superfund365" is conceived, designed and produced by Brooke Singer. The
programming and Flash guru behind the project is John Kuiphoff. Kurt
Olmstead provides business analysis and additional programming. Emily
Gallagher is assisting with project research and EPA relations. Camera and
sound work by Andrew Rueland.

"Superfund365" is a 2007 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc.
for its Turbulence website. It was made possible with funding from the
Jerome Foundation. Additional funding was provided by New York Foundation
for the Arts (NYFA).

BIOGRAPHY

Brooke Singer is a digital media artist who lives in New York City. Her work
provides entry into important social issues that are often characterized as
specialized or opaque to a general public. She likes to work with emerging
technologies not only because they are fun but also because they are
contingent and malleable. She is co-founder of the art, technology and
activist group, Preemptive Media, and Assistant Professor of New Media at
Purchase College.

Jo-Anne Green, Co-Director
New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc.: http://new-radio.org
New York: 917.548.7780 . Boston: 617.522.3856
Turbulence: http://turbulence.org
Networked_Performance Blog: http://turbulence.org/blog
Networked_Music_Review: http://turbulence.org/networked_music_review
Upgrade! Boston: http://turbulence.org/upgrade
New American Radio: http://somewhere.org

DISCUSSION

Interview with Scot Gresham-Lancaster


Interview with Scot Gresham-Lancaster
By Helen Thorington
Networked_Music_Review

Scot Gresham-Lancaster is a composer, performer, instrument builder and
educator. He is dedicated to research and performance using the expanding
capabilities of computer networks for musical and cross discipline
expression. He studied with Philip Ianni, Roy Harris, Darius Milhaud, John
Chowning, Robert Ashley, Terry Riley, "Blue" Gene Tyranny and Jack Jarret,
among others. Gresham-Lancaster has been a composer in residence at Mills
College and he has been developing new families of controllers at STEIM,
Amsterdam. He has toured and recorded as a member of the HUB and has
performed the music of Alvin Curran, Pauline Oliveros, John Zorn, and John
Cage, under their direction. Gresham-Lancaster has also worked as a
technical assistant to Lou Harrison, Iannis Xenakis, David Tudor among many
others.

Helen Thorington: Welcome Scot. You were a member of the computer network
band, the HUB, and an early pioneer of computer networked music. Tell us
about the HUB and the kind of work you, John Bischoff, Tim Perkis, Chris
Brown, Mark Trayle and Phil Stone did at that time.

Scot Gresham-Lancaster: The first Computer Network Music grew out of an
underground new music scene that developed around the San Francisco Bay Area
most specifically Mills College and the Center for Contemporary Music. There
are several resources that might be of interest to those readers that want
to investigate the historical background.

Read the full interview and ask questions at http://tinyurl.com/2q9p7l

Jo-Anne Green, Co-Director
New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc.: http://new-radio.org
New York: 917.548.7780 . Boston: 617.522.3856
Turbulence: http://turbulence.org
Networked_Performance Blog: http://turbulence.org/blog
Networked_Music_Review: http://turbulence.org/networked_music_review
Upgrade! Boston: http://turbulence.org/upgrade
New American Radio: http://somewhere.org