Troy Innocent
Since 2003
Works in Caulfield South, Virgin Islands Australia

BIO
Troy Innocent

Troy Innocent has been exploring new aesthetics enabled by computers since 1989. Deconstructing and understanding the endemic properties, language and nature of the digital realm has been the underlying theme of his work. Trained as a designer and practising as an artist, he has moved across media in works involving computer animation, installation art, interactive media, synthetic images and sound. His work has been exhibited widely at national and international galleries, conferences, and symposia.

Typically, these works involve the construction of artificial worlds that explore the
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OPPORTUNITY

::: THIRD ITERATION - Final Call for Papers & Artworks


Deadline:
Tue Sep 23, 2003 00:00

FINAL CALL for Papers & Artworks

The Conference Committee has been inundated with a great number of
requests to extend the deadline for submission of Papers,
Technical/Artist Talks and Artworks. The new and absolute final date for submission is now September 23, 2005.

For submissions being posted, please email iterate@csse.monash.edu.au so we can confirm receipt of your material.

..........................................................................................................
THIRD ITERATION
third international conference on generative systems in the electronic arts
November 30th to December 2nd, 2005: Melbourne, Australia

THIRD ITERATION is the third international conference on generative
systems in the electronic arts. It investigates three major themes -
human-computer creativity, generative meaning systems, and the
computational sublime. Following on from First Iteration (1999) and
Second Iteration (2001), this year’s conference will be held in
Melbourne, Australia.

For further information please visit the conference web site at
http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~iterate/TI/ or contact us via email
at iterate@csse.monash.edu.au


OPPORTUNITY

CFP a THIRD ITERATION: generative systems in the electronic arts


Deadline:
Mon Aug 08, 2005 21:49

THIRD ITERATION
third international conference on generative systems in the electronic arts
November 30th to December 2nd, 2005 : Melbourne, Australia

THIRD ITERATION is the third international conference on generative systems in the electronic arts. It investigates three major themes - human-computer creativity, generative meaning systems, and the computational sublime. Following on from First Iteration (1999) and Second Iteration (2001), this year’s conference will be held in Melbourne, Australia.

We are seeking the submission of papers, technical & artist talks, software art, animation, audio and installation works that address the three conference themes:

:: HUMAN-COMPUTER CREATIVITY
The relationship of the creative process to generative systems is fundamentally different than that of other modes of design and production. Rather than being engaged with the construction of an artefact, the designer specifies the rules of production for a system that constructs artefacts. What types of generative systems are suited to the new methodologies of generative design and creative evolution? How are artists and designers collaborating with these systems to produce creative human-machine hybrids? Can the computer play a more significant role in the creative process through new developments such as ‘creative emergence’? Are new network technologies or hardware systems enabling alternative experiences of generative art?

:: GENERATIVE MEANING SYSTEMS
Generative systems may be coupled with ontological and semiotic models for the expression of what may be described as ‘generative meaning systems’. Can generative systems be used to evolve language via feedback that interprets the meaning of their output? In what ways have generative systems been applied to semiotic and cognitive spaces - such as in the world of digital games? How are generative systems being used to model the growth of language, social and cultural networks? What role does audience interaction and cognitive process play in generating meaning?

:: THE COMPUTATIONAL SUBLIME
The output of generative systems is characterised by scale, complexity and behaviour that transcend the limits of human perception that can be described as the computational sublime. This idea suggests processes that we cannot comprehend directly, yet can experience through computational machines. How is the theory of the computational sublime placed in relation to other theories of the sublime in nature and art? Although a fundamental understanding of emergence itself remains elusive, it is a defining characteristic of the nature of generative systems. What is the relationship of emergence to the computational sublime?

The deadline for submissions is Friday 9th September 2005.

For further information please visit the conference web site at http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~iterate/TI/ or contact us via email at iterate@csse.monash.edu.au

The principal sponsor of THIRD ITERATION is the Centre for Electronic Media Art, Monash University. CEMA is an interdisciplinary research and production centre, established to explore critical and technical possibilities for electronic media art.

THIRD ITERATION is produced with the assistance of the Film Victoria Digital Media Fund - the Digital Media Fund is funded by Multimedia Victoria as an ICT industry development initiative aimed at bringing together technology, creativity and talent for the benefit of all Victorians.


DISCUSSION

Re: Net Baroque


Hello Christina,
Enjoyed the work and your thoughts on a net baroque.

It would be interesting to explore the idea of these spaces having what
can be described as ?agency? ie. electronic space can be populated with
?intelligent entities? that interact with the user. Clearly the moving image/sound
fields in piranesia have agency in that they pursue the viewer in order
to immerse them in loops of image and sound. ie. what ?happen(s) in human
imagination and memory, in the affective experience of resonance and recursion
inside the spaces of the Baroque? is also happening within the ?mind? of
the machine in its model of the player/user. It is not only the perception
of the space that changes in the mind of the player/user, but an electronic
space can literally change / mutate / reform / loop around etc.

Perhaps this agency is embodied in the religious associations of Baroque
experience in that they are mediating / simulating experience of other mysterious
/ spiritual forces. The notion of the ghost in the machine / cyborg could
be perceived as a new manifestation of this ?other? force.

The immediacy of the space and its actualisation of abstract logics / codes
through simulation makes the difference ? the space interacts with the user
in a literal / real way.

Troy.

>
>> Hi Christina,
>>
>> What is the plugin to install for
>> <http://www.internet3d.net/paratopias/piranesia/index.html> ? I got a
new
>> hard drive and did a clean install of xp, so i don't have all the plugins
>> installed i used to, but would like to view your vrml.
>
>Blaxxun for pcs
>http://www.blaxxun.com/services/support/download/install.shtml
>Cortona for mac
>http://www.parallelgraphics.com/products/cortonamac/
>>
>There should be music fragments in interactive crashes, that are stimulated
>by the users exploration but at least on my server the sound isnt coming
>across. Does it work on yours? I sincerely apologize if the sound isnt
>working as it is crucial to the sense of space in the work.
>
>> concerning 'baroque', it seems like a term that has been used by some
to
>> primarily disparage plugin net.art. and it is misapplied to work that
uses
>> plugins but doesn't really seem baroque, though there is some net.art
that
>> does seem (vaguely) baroque. but it seems mainly a term of disparagement,
>> doesn't it? Though I should add I don't think that's the way you're using
>> it.
>>
>Well, just for a quick thought here, the Baroque is a very rich period
in
>music, visual art and architecture, rich because its sense of space and
>meaning is hybrid and has an interest in interactivity, interpolation,
>recursion, reversal, reflexivity, juxtaposition and emergence. Think Bach,
>Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Piranesi, Bernini, Borromini. The term 'baroque'
>has an idiomatic connotation of a quality of excess or immersion,
>totalizing, over the top.
>
>I suspect that an argument could me made to link analogically between
>aspects of the nature of electronic space representation and affect and
the
>space generated by the Baroque. Troy Innocent identifies some aspects
of
>electronic space (excerpts), which I link (very anecdotally), in the spirit
>of play, to Baroque spatial obsessions in the following imaginary dialogue.
>(Apologies to Troy for misapplying his very finely tuned definitions and
>wholesale lifting out of context, my fault entirely):
>
>For the Troy Innocent complete text please see
><http://www.fineartforum.org/Backissues/Vol_17/faf_v17_n09/reviews/reviews_i
>ndex.html>
>
>(TROY)"....Feedback loop. A combination of direct control and immediate
>feedback create a strong sense of engagement between the user and the
>electronic space... "
>
>(CHRISTINA) In the Baroque, the inside space of the work attempts to
>stimulate a constant shifting so that as you engage with the space it opens
>up volumes that invite imaginative projection beyond themselves... The
>feedback loop is in the function of the 'user's kinaesthetic memory inside
>the baroque space
>
>(TROY) - "the starting point is a void, these spaces do not need to follow
>the rules of the real world - fantastic new experiences may be created
based
>on their own rules of existence. "
>
>(CHRISTINA) Baroque aesthetics of space often involve emergence from
>darkness, doubt, the unknowable, the unseeable, and towards transformation,
>transfiguration, excess, illumination, and back, to shadow. An interest
in
>complexities of form arising dynamically and in unstable combinations,
cliff
>hanger specials, out of the darkness.
>
>(TROY)... "intense focus is placed on the user's immediate experience of
>the
>virtual world. This connection is often strong enough that, psychologically,
>the user is inside that world...."
>
>(CHRISTINA) The affective space of the Baroque wants to draw you into
>itself, absorption is the watchword rather than independent status.
>Cartesian space is not privileged. What you see may not turn out to be
what
>you can know; complex transformations are just offstage and about to come
>on.
>
>(TROY)...."This sense of immediacy is partly to do with the way these spaces
>are perceived. Engaging with the real world is an experience that immerses
>the body in their surroundings. Direct and peripheral vision, sound
>resonating within the environment, being able to move over, around, through,
>in and out of spaces, and the ability to observe and manipulate solid
>objects all contribute to this feeling of being in the world...."
>
>(CHRISTINA) Obviously this could not happen in a pre electronic space in
>such a literal, hands on way. But, did it not, does it not, happen in
>human imagination and memory, in the affective experience of resonance
and
>recursion inside the spaces of the Baroque?
>
>(TROY) "...Transmutational space. Electronic spaces are artificial
>constructions - simulations where the entire virtual world is a code, every
>part of the space is a re-representation. They allow multiple forms of
>representation to easily coexist and be blended with one another, creating
>hybrid systems of signs."
>
>(CHRISTINA) Especially so in the Baroque, I imagine...created in a time
of
>breakdown and clash of ideologies, loss of normative or rule based cultural
>standards, nearly continuous warfare, and rapid commercial and technological
>advances, leading to a taste for fragmentation, the edge of chaos,
>dissolution at the edge of organization--generally, a hybridity, a fluidity
>of forms, to quote Eisenstein.
>
>
>
>> looking at the def below, for instance, i don't see it applying to my
own
>> work or much of the work discussed at
>> http://trace.ntu.ac.uk/Review/index.cfm?articleE , which is interactive
>> audio work
>
>Probably true enough..
>
>>
>> are you 'reclaiming' the term 'baroque'?
>>
>That would be far too grandiose an aspiration!
>
>Significantly, Eisenstein recounts that he came up with the idea of montage
>from studying the Carcieri series of Piranesi, a series of imaginary prisons
>with irrational spatial configurations. My vrml piece, to which you refer,
>was inspired by Eisenstein's remark:
>
>