Tom Moody
Since 2002
Works in New York, New York United States of America

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DISCUSSION

The Chambers Pavilion at The Wrong - New Digital Art Biennale


Great, and thanks to Furtherfield for spreading the word on this. I mentioned Rene's piece and stooped to self-plugging because I think Nate Hitchcock's post does a disservice to the range of Ludy's choices in the "Chamber" - she went out on a limb beyond the standard net art "room with eerie drones" and then Hitchcock pruned the presentation back to basically that (nice as these examples may be).

DISCUSSION

The Chambers Pavilion at The Wrong - New Digital Art Biennale


As an artist in this pavilion I would have hoped for a tad more critical commentary. Such as, how "Limelite Tab One Remix" injected some wacky "dump style" into the otherwise somber mood of the chambers you've depicted above. What was Sara Ludy thinking? (Thanks, Sara.) As mentioned in an earlier comment, artists have to do their own heavy lifting in terms of critical writing, so in that spirit, I posted some thoughts about the work of my co-chamberist, Rene Abythe: http://www.tommoody.us/archives/2013/11/06/rene-abythes-start-up-and-shutdown-sequence/

DISCUSSION

What's Postinternet Got to do with Net Art?


^actual core similarities in people's methods

DISCUSSION

What's Postinternet Got to do with Net Art?


On our panel in 2008 the NYC art gallerist Magda Sawon was in the audience and after listening to Petra Cortright, Damon Zucconi, and yrs truly talk about our work and what was happening on the group blogs she said, "I don't see anything new here, it's just the collage and the found object."
More than terminology, we need people who can see a bit more perceptively and help artists with the hard work of evaluating what's going on in these "cell" activities. This means learning more about people's processes in order to make distinctions between, say, found art and made art, between art and what Paul B. Davis called "instrument building," and between a "look" (such as what Bridle mashed together) and actual core similarities people's methods.
There's much to be done, and artists will continue to run the fork lifts and keep the bridges trussed while postindustrial panelists spin new unhelpful names for the infrastructure.

DISCUSSION

What's Postinternet Got to do with Net Art?


In the "sings the blogs" example above, "post-internet" was a rather trite way of saying your art was based on something the whole world was already reacting to. The other term was "internet aware art." When Guthrie Lonergan first used it, it was a joke: like, I think we're all pretty aware of the internet. Then people such as Ed Halter started saying it meant "art based on the internet" and Guthrie defined it again in a joking way, meaning art made with an idea to how it was going to look on the internet. Calling something a bullshit label isn't necessarily an intergenerational conflict. Artists younger than me also laugh at "post-internet."
There are good things keeping us occupied in this pre-"post-" stage. Just anecdotally, in my own recent experience:
I see people on dump.fm doing amazing work with Photoblaster and bon.gs and GIFmelter and it's all relatively new, or at least a relatively new mix of HTML5, canvas and/or jquery and the old filetypes that still work in browsers.
In Computers Club Drawing Society we use communally available drawing software (from the late '90s I think) to make new drawings on a blog: this isn't aggregating or archiving, the work is made from scratch with software that doesn't allow cloning, importing, or pasting screenshots, only digital drawing and painting.
I'm also involved with the modular synthesis revival where cottage industries are springing up to build small pieces of hardware that combine old-fashioned voltage control with Arduino boards, granular synthesis and other purely digital processing.
None of this is "post-" anything but it's also not New in the sense of a James Bridle repackaging well-known concepts to promote his own work. Just because there's no buzzword doesn't mean people are flailing.