Tom Moody
Since 2002
Works in New York, New York United States of America

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DISCUSSION

July 2: NYC poetry event with Kev, Bunny Rogers, and Brigid Mason


Was re-reading this Bewersdorf photo essay from 2008: http://artfcity.com/2008/07/23/img-mgmt-stock-photography-watermarks-as-the-presence-of-god/
It's well written and wry but you never think for a moment that he actually believes watermarks on bad stock photos are signs of God.
Soon after, he "quit the internet," a gesture literally anyone can do, yet it is repeatedly invoked as an artistic act worthy of mention or coverage.
From Michael Connor's recent writing, it sounds as if, while the rest of creative humanity spent the last few years trying to puzzle out how to be productive artists without being slaves to a capitalist faux-sharing model, Bewersdorf wandered around the offline wasteland and had a sincere religious conversion, and now writes "Taoist poetry about the internet."
What if he had found Jesus? Would you have booked him for lay reading sermons about Christ's presence in cyberspace? I doubt it -- but the Tao is cool. In the '70s we had the Tao of Physics and now we have the Tao of the Internet.
Zachary, on PostHang you described my tweets on this topic as "tendentious." The words aren't sugar-coated but in what way are they biased? Could not someone have legitimate concerns that Rhizome's fandom for Bewersdorf's early work is affecting its institutional judgment now? That would be tendentious, wouldn't it?

DISCUSSION

The Accidental Archivist: Criticism on Facebook, and How to Preserve It


And in reply to Zachary above -- "more soon" is fine. It's great that you're tackling these issues.

DISCUSSION

The Accidental Archivist: Criticism on Facebook, and How to Preserve It


Or, it is horribly adequate if you want to vent to a few friends and not have a permanent searchable archive of your comments. (Assuming Facebook doesn't then blow another set of privacy seals, as it has been known to do.)
The decision to move new media discussion, announcements, etc to Facebook has already happened. The larger question is what does the "public sphere" mean when so many people have elected to use a system of Byzantine complexity with complex code and constantly shifting rules and allegiances. Is Rhizome the public sphere, attempting to collect this material, or is Facebook, where the discussion is happening in real time?

DISCUSSION

The Accidental Archivist: Criticism on Facebook, and How to Preserve It


Here is a specific example and a question about how this Facebook proxy would work.
According to Paddy Johnson ( http://artfcity.com/2014/05/23/friday-links-a-wall-of-dicks-and-some-internet-bickering/ ), Marisa Olson recently "took her complaints to Facebook" about a show she curated that was cancelled by a commercial gallery. Johnson links to the post ( https://www.facebook.com/marisaolson/posts/10151999971306442 ) but when I, as a non-Zuck, click it I see a broken thumb icon and the words: "Sorry, this page isn't available. The link you followed may be broken, or the page may have been removed." Johnson says the link is correct and wonders if I have to be Olson's friend to see the post. I have no idea and this is normally the point that I go look for something more interesting on the internet.
My question is, will this Rhizome feed be a record of Zachary Kaplan's friends' activities? Not that there is anything wrong with that, if he's the person volunteering to do the difficult work of monitoring Facebook discussions, but I'm wondering how (or whether) Rhizome accesses a newsworthy or much-discussed event if the author is shielding it from public discussion by publishing only to a network of friends.

DISCUSSION

The Accidental Archivist: Criticism on Facebook, and How to Preserve It


I thought it was probably a joke but it still gives me the willies. Good work, Zach.