Tom Moody
Since 2002
Works in New York, New York United States of America

Discussions (231) Opportunities (0) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Response to "New Media Artists vs Artists With Computers"


Curt,
It doesn't seem possible for you to have an online discussion without abusive language ("trollish" etc.) so I try to avoid engaging you directly. Sometimes it's difficult not to respond to your personal digs, hence the "oblique dis."

The academic "we"--gimme a break. We think you presume too much.

Can we (meaning, the two of us) please stop talking now?

I would definitely participate more in Rhizome discussions but you seem to feel they are yours somehow.

Best, Tom

DISCUSSION

Response to "New Media Artists vs Artists With Computers"


Curt,
Ceci replied to my post and I replied to her.
Fine if you want to insert yourself into the conversation but it's still a free country, no one has to reply.
Your use of the first person plural is a most uninviting conversational technique.
Best, Tom

DISCUSSION

Response to "New Media Artists vs Artists With Computers"


For the record my blog post was called "New Media vs Artists with Computers," not "New Media Artists vs Artists with Computers," as Ceci retitled it. The post was about categories of ways of working.

Here's my response to what Ceci wrote above for those who can't or won't follow a link outside this walled garden:

>>Ceci Moss at Rhizome.org tested the argument with actual examples of artists' work, something the original post avoided. Paul Slocum is of course that rare bird flying between the art and new media realms. Joan Leandre is comparatively mired in a particular set of geek assumptions. Go to his site and you find, for example, dozens of .exe files with the warning that downloading them can harm your computer if you don't "choose each file to a High Density fat32 and run New World's install program." Whether or not that is a joke, this is the essence of geekdom and most art world people will not go there, particularly any art world person with Windows who survived the Internet Exploder era. Leandre's "Velvet Strike" is more credible at least on an anecdotal level: the artist hacked into hard core war game nerd sites and put antimilitary graffiti on the virtual walls, pissing off many players.

>>cf. "New Media vs Artists with Computers" with Guthrie Lonergan's "Hackers vs Defaults" table ( http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22hackers+vs+defaults%22&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&oq= ). That table may have been read as two different flavors within new media, and therefore benign, but this blog would like to claim it as another example of "stark polarization," to use Moss's term. Also cf. Net Art 1.0 vs 2.0.

DISCUSSION

bodega list (2009) - Jeff Sisson


its readers already recognize the validity of the art covered here"

This is my point--make something, announce it in a press release, get a plug on tech sites for your "innovation," put it on your resume. Six months later the innovation is another dead web site. We're discussing bodega list now because I questioned this aspect of it. Whereas if the thing had been allowed to develop its own life through a network of friends, viral growth, journalists finding out about it through the grapevine, and people in New York actually, possibly contributing to it, the author might be forced to work the bugs out of it and think about what it means beyond his original, announced intention (if it acquires any such meaning). I say it deserves better than the ghetto of presumed successful projects. It's a lot of work for a passing smile about "cataloguing things that don't need to be catalogued.

DISCUSSION

bodega list (2009) - Jeff Sisson


Thanks for continuing to emphasize my social conscience. You are building up some serious cred for me here. Obviously you take my point that absent any larger group participation it is just a little joke and Rhizome probably shouldn't have validated it as "tech art.