Tom Moody
Since 2002
Works in New York, New York United States of America

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DISCUSSION

Feed my Feed: Radical publishing in Facebook Groups


Pastasauce's comments are mean and sarcastic but the analysis of, among other things, the different notions of "public" are well worth considering. This confusion over what's public came up during the recent Ryder Ripps controversies. Paddy Johnson took screen shots of Ripps' Facebook conversations (which she, but not everyone had access to) and made them the basis of a critical "hit piece." When called on this, she said "Ripps has a public Facebook presence." What does that mean? I can't view his content. To me, "public" means viewable without a login and fully searchable. I realize it's awkward for Rhizome staffers and writers who spend much time Facebooking to have legacy readers that still believe in an open web environment. Pastasauce compares Facebook to driving, with its accepted rules and regs, but to me the pro-Facebook articles by intellectuals sound like jokes pack-a-day smokers make to each other: "Yeah it's taking years off my life, but they're the years at the very end, and who cares about those? Heh heh heh.

DISCUSSION

Feed my Feed: Radical publishing in Facebook Groups


Thanks for the Pew data -- I will peruse and report back. I've been "indie" on the web for about 15 years but I don't consider myself a "coder." It's possible to host content on the web outside of Facebook without any specialized knowledge. There are many sites looking to host content, and bots crawling all of them for searchable information.

DISCUSSION

Notes on a definition of Net Art based on what I remember from a borrowed copy of Nettitudes


Thanks for confirming that Rhizome Today has been shelved. (Sorry if you did already and I missed it.) A complete archive of these "0-day" posts should be made public, if they aren't already. It's especially relevant in light of this discussion of the paucity of acceptable net art writing. All the artists you recommended in Rhizome Today posts cannot use these recommendations if they are permanently offline.

DISCUSSION

Feed my Feed: Radical publishing in Facebook Groups


Pastasauce" has a reply to Michael Connor -- I was emailed a copy -- and no, I am not Pastasauce but I certainly sympathize. Pastasauce has apparently been "blocked" and cannot post the reply. Can this be remedied? I strongly disagree with Michael Connor's implication that "commenting culture" is richer inside Facebook than outside. Pastasauce's reply examines some of the Facebook comments made in response to Dorothy Howard and they aren't very rich. I think Rhizome readers should see this. Please let me know here if Pastasauce is unblocked and I'll get word to him or her. If it looks like he or she is banned, I'll post the reply on tommoody.us.

DISCUSSION

Feed my Feed: Radical publishing in Facebook Groups


Howard's article is a bit strange in that gives viable reasons for not Facebooking, presents some alternatives, and then concludes with the author creating a Facebook group. Pastasauce's reply also lacks a coherent purpose -- what is Pastasauce mad about, exactly? Everything!
Howard's main justification for using Facebook is based on demographics ("64% of adults use Facebook, while 30% of Americans use it as their primary news source"). I would like to know more about these Pew numbers. Facebook is notorious for inflating its user data. If the 64% percent is based on polling, what is the universe -- 64% of US adults? 64% of US adults with internet access? What constitutes access? A monthly phone plan? etc.
If 30% are getting their news from Facebook, does that mean 70% are still getting it from television? Maybe we should be starting our own cable access TV shows.
It's a big leap from these numbers to the statement "opting out constitutes an act of defiance of the norm." Some businesses do not allow access to Facebook during work hours for fear of company information leaking out. Is this defiance of the norm or just prudent practice? Also, how long will Facebook be "the norm"? We've been besieged by articles about the younger generation bailing out in favor of Instagram (until Facebook bought it), Twitter, Snapchat, and other venues that have nothing to do with academic non-profits. They are moving because Facebook is where their parents are.
Pastasauce's notion of sleeve-rolling and HTML-learning (if it rises to the level of a notion above hardcore trolling) is scary for many people ("what, just put up a site and wait for people to find me?") but that direction offers a hope of independence, as opposed to Howard's "learn to embrace the system" accommodation. Facebook may be a necessary step to reaching the broadest possible audience but we're talking about radical art and ideas here, not becoming a bestselling author. Aren't we? Quality of eyeballs, not the number, is what matters. The alternatives to what Ken Kesey called "the combine" are still plentiful.