Steven Read
Since 2004
Works in Denver, Colorado United States of America

PORTFOLIO (2)
BIO
I am a meta-artist, and a conclusivist, who likes to send messages to receivers of messages. The message is art. The message is clear. And also its myspace play game youtube game cheats for ps2 baby boy names proxy https youporn girls music lyrics free radio stations facebook craigslist free lady sonia funny videos paris hilton hurricane flossie dictionary jose offerman walmart pictures of cats local newspaper hot west nile fever symptoms mattel recall mary louise parker and even more...

His website is located at:
http://www.stevenread.com

He hopes you enjoy the today.
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DISCUSSION

Re: normalization vs. generativity


It is entirely conceivable that net.art is essentially a bowl of grapes with almonds living inside the grapes and with horse-flies eating all the seeds and spreading their maggots over the network of grape juice with a preponderance of straws mingling about such that the bandwidth via straw sucking is easily described as the ratio of flies to grape-almond fluid thus giving net.art an inconceivable nature with all the entropic discussions about hair dryers, ectoplasmic fluidial dynamics, or even ladders. Just my 2 cents anyways...

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Commission Voting: Finalist Ranking


Its curious to me that my proposal page only got 10 page hits from jurors. The jury process includes making these pages which show more depth, work samples, examples, resumes, and so forth. Mine in particular had working prototypes in flash of what was to be built, which were in my opinion quite useful for an understanding of the project. For mine to be juried, in my opinion the page needed to be visited and the prototypes examined. Only 10 people viewed it. Fair or unfair? Not to waste time being sore that I lost - boo hoo everybody get out their violins, but I feel it wasn't really juried. Or maybe my writeup just sucked so much that it enticed very few people to click the proposal page. But a hell of alot of work was put into the proposal page and the prototypes in particular.

This brings up something "funny" that happened last year at a big museum biennial competition I was in. Over 750 applicants with a 'hot guest curator'. Everyone paid their $25 or $40 or whatever it was to be juried by said curator. I happened to know the days that the curator was in town for it. Since my particular entry was a piece of "Internet Art" - this gave me the power to quantitate their process. For the first time in this particular museum's history I think, an entrant had such invisible power. Looking at my logs and running some shell commands (as done here with the rhizome commissions), I could see that it wasn't even juried once.

Here again, I really didn't care that I lost, but I knew and had proof the process wasn't all that fair as the entry form implied. What should I then do with such information? Being curious, I asked around and eventually found out that most entries were 'pre-screened' out before jurying really took place with the big international curator. That part of the process was not advertised, and most people who paid their $40 got screwed. If you add that up, that's over $15,000 - $20,000 that was earned by the museum unfairly. I'm not saying that art should or should not be fair, I just found it interesting that my web server logs exposed the often nasty nature of large art institutions.

curt cloninger wrote:

> t.whid wrote:
>
> > I'm not sure I understand your reponse. I was actually being serious
> > with
> > that little sentence. d'oh!
>
> I figured you were. The "art" of superbad is done little justice by
> your sentence (although your sentence is well written and technically
> accurate). The more an artwork traffics in the visceral, a-lingual,
> and dys-conceptual, the less reducible its "art" is to words, the more
> banal it sounds when described by words, the less chance it stands of
> getting a grant like this. And that's fine. As Ryan Griffis points
> out, the commodity gallery market and entertainment industry
> financially support their fair share of "spectacular" (his derogatory
> term) work. I'm just pointing out the skew.

DISCUSSION

Re: funding and rhizome comissions


Good thoughts!

Jason Nelson wrote:

> Perhaps what I find most disheartening about the Rhizome commissions
> doesn't have
> anything to do with the process (sure it has flaws) or the work
> chosen (I'm guessing
> the voting range was rather narrow). Rather it is the total budget
> of Rhizome.org.
> Those running Rhizome work on a budget that is less than many
> sculptures commissioned for the front court yards of libraries. Of
> course the Rhizome staff work
> far too much for far too little reward to make this all happen.
>
> But my question has been and still is, why are nearly 200 (I would
> say a rather large percentage of active net artists) of us competing
> for a few 2-3000 dollar grants? Why aren't we getting the same
> attention and support as other art forms? Why is it if I create
> an artwork designed for the web, I can get it published all over,
> and played with by tens or even hundreds of thousands of users, but
> then still scramble for a few thousand dollars. While if I take the
> artwork and rethink it to a physical space, shoving some educational
> whatnot to the end of it, that I can then get close to the total
> yearly rhizome budget to stick it into a science center.
>
> What do we need to do to dip into the larger pools of funds swimming
> around in the art world, and to do this without altering our work to
> become video art or straight installation?
>
> Does google or ebay or msn or yahoo fund net art? And if not why
> not? If a nearly dead car company can pay half a million for artworks,
> why cant the net giants pay for net art? Has anyone tried contacting
> them? To maybe spend some cash on sending someone out to their
> headquarters to garner cash for such things?
>
> some thoughts........Jason Nelson
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------
> Yahoo! Mail goes everywhere you do. Get it on your phone.

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Commission Voting: Finalist


Its curious to me that my proposal page only got 10 page hits from jurors. The jury process includes making these pages which show more depth, work samples, examples, resumes, and so forth. Mine in particular had working prototypes in flash of what was to be built, which were in my opinion quite useful for an understanding of the project. For mine to be juried, in my opinion the page needed to be visited and the prototypes examined. Only 10 people viewed it. Fair or unfair? Not to waste time being sore that I lost - boo hoo everybody get out their violins, but I feel it wasn't really juried. Or maybe my writeup just sucked so much that it enticed very few people to click the proposal page. But a hell of alot of work was put into the proposal page and the prototypes in particular.

This brings up something "funny" that happened last year at a big museum biennial competition I was in. Over 750 applicants with a 'hot guest curator'. Everyone paid their $25 or $40 or whatever it was to be juried by said curator. I happened to know the days that the curator was in town for it. Since my particular entry was a piece of "Internet Art" - this gave me the power to quantitate their process. For the first time in this particular museum's history I think, an entrant had such invisible power. Looking at my logs and running some shell commands (as done here with the rhizome commissions), I could see that it wasn't even juried once.

I really didn't care that much that I lost, but in this case I knew and had proof that the process wasn't all that fair as the entry form had implied. What should I then do with such information? Being curious, I asked around and eventually found out that most entries were 'pre-screened' out before jurying really took place with the big international curator. That part of the process was not advertised, and most people who paid their $40 got screwed. If you add that up, that's over $15,000 - $20,000 that was earned by the museum unfairly. I'm not saying that art should or should not be fair, I just found it interesting that my web server logs exposed the often nasty nature of large art institutions.

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Commissions


I christmas-treed the whole damn thing.
Just kidding.

I read through just about all of them, which took a long time, but it was nice to see the various ideas going around. It certainly cured the job boredom I was having that day. When I was intrigued by something in the text, I typically clicked over to the proposal webpage, but I'm not sure many voters are going to these pages. Who knows, I think overall its a good system and will work at the end of the day. Its especially going to work well for me because I hacked into the member tables, and wrote a script that votes 'yes' on my submission every 10 minutes using different member accounts.
Just kidding.

The main issue I see about the process, is that there are simply assloads of submissions. Not many people can or will see them all. I don't see an easy way around that issue, just the nature of the beast. I guess one way would be to show voters only a small paraphraph of text, instead of the full 500 word text. This would require the submitter to provide a shortened 'elevator' version of the text (2-3 sentences), which is the ultimate challenge, to so succinctly organize all this crazy stuff floating around our brains. But it would make voting more realistic, and the voter could still click and see more if desired.

I have trouble making decisions, so it was hard to decide yes/no on many of them while trying to go through as quickly as I could. I would caution to 'yes' in these cases...or maybe no, or yes, or no, or yes, or no...


CURATED EXHIBITIONS (1)