Steven Read
Since 2004
Works in Denver, Colorado United States of America

PORTFOLIO (2)
BIO
I am a meta-artist, and a conclusivist, who likes to send messages to receivers of messages. The message is art. The message is clear. And also its myspace play game youtube game cheats for ps2 baby boy names proxy https youporn girls music lyrics free radio stations facebook craigslist free lady sonia funny videos paris hilton hurricane flossie dictionary jose offerman walmart pictures of cats local newspaper hot west nile fever symptoms mattel recall mary louise parker and even more...

His website is located at:
http://www.stevenread.com

He hopes you enjoy the today.
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DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Towards a Digital Minimalism (2004-) Draft/Alpha Revision


Thanks! You know me - "pushing technology to the minimum"
-steven

Pall Thayer wrote:

> Hi Steve,
> That's a great piece. I really like it. I haven't read Patrick's
> paper yet but did skim over it lightly and am not entirely convinced
> that a reduction in bits necessarily constitutes "digital minimalism".
>
> But this piece looks wonderful in a very minimalist sense that goes
> beyond the number of bits.
>
> This is written in haste, maybe I'll post something more elaborate
> later this eve.
>
> Pall
>
> On 19.9.2006, at 16:52, Steve OR Steven Read wrote:
>
> > Very nice. A fascinating topic. Here is a shameless link to one of
> > my more recent software installations, which I guess is going
> > towards something like "digital minimalism", or as I was calling
> > it, "high-tech minimalism".
> >
> > 8 bits of Infinite Contemplation
> > http://www.stevenread.com/8bitcontemplation
> >
> > Steve Read
> > +
> > -> post: list@rhizome.org
> > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> > -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/
> > subscribe.rhiz
> > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> > +
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> > 29.php
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Pall Thayer
> p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca
> http://www.this.is/pallit
>
>
>
>

DISCUSSION

Re: Towards a Digital Minimalism (2004-) Draft/Alpha Revision


Very nice. A fascinating topic. Here is a shameless link to one of my more recent software installations, which I guess is going towards something like "digital minimalism", or as I was calling it, "high-tech minimalism".

8 bits of Infinite Contemplation
http://www.stevenread.com/8bitcontemplation

Steve Read

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: regarding the On Colaboration reblog on


Thanks for the reply. I totally hear what you are saying. I don't expect most engineers to like what I'm saying.

'hacking' can also mean "to hack away". Meaning something akin to this 'exporatory' process, as opposed to actual hacking in the reverse-engineering or security sense.

Actually, I am senior level software architect. I have coded for over 20 years and have written probably a million lines of code at least. I know this culture quite well! What I mean by materialism here, is that people say "this is the right way to do it, the best way, tried and true, if you don't do it this way, it is bad or wrong or could be better". In general, yes, that is how engineering is. There are sound principles to follow. These are useful in most cases. Materialistic here, meaning snobbery as the quality is judged by how they feel the material should be used 'best'.

Once upon a time, painters in the renaissance were the same way. "this is painting practice, tradition, this is how you do it correctly, this is how you do perspective and figures, mix paints, and so forth". They were materialistic about painting. Then along comes modernism which changes that and opens it up. Nowadays, paint can be used anyway a person wants - there is no correct way or "best practice" really. (Yet I would add, there are still today millions of painting snobs out there who scoff at certain usages of paint) Actually painting at this time was almost more a science than an art, wonderfully blurred boundaries back then.

I talk about painting because I paint, for many years, as well as coding. I love both. The process is similar. The material somewhat similar, believe it or not. Now what I mean here, is that what if I want to use the material of software code in whatever weird stubborn way that I want? I am an artist, can I not use the material and any way I desire to get an effect? What happens then? Sure - the program won't be easily maintainable, hard to read, unmodularized, unextensible, redundant, slow, buggy all these things perhaps. But so what? What is the result? Is the result expressive? Useful? Nonsenes? This is art code. Not business code. Meaning the 'horrible' and eccentric code and software takes on a whole new personalilty. Much like the early modernist painters did.

And I am not talking about code itself as end product, but in the execution of the code. I believe this is possible and worth investigating, what I am saying here. But I'm not quite yet sure what I am saying really. I'm just tired of engineers and their code snobbery, even though when I act as 'engineer' for money, I am somewhat of a code snob.

steven

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: regarding the On Colaboration reblog onthe Rhiz front page


somehow the threading got screwed up and replies are going to text root

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Re: regarding the On Colaboration reblog on


I agree, that exploratory coding can be good!

Its interesting that coders and engineers, in general, are materialistic, with this idea of defining an exploratory process as 'hacking'. That is the accepted thinking, that unplanned coding is dangerous, unprofessional, and leads to 'bad design'. I disagree, in terms of coding as an artist. If you are making software to run businesses, then yes I guess its hacking. For art, then NO. That is akin to saying that someone who is making a painting with zero preparation or structure, is hacking the painting. They are just painting, not hacking. Some people are good at that sort of process, others have the painting all worked out before touching the canvas. Either way works and can lead to 'good painting'. Same with code, some are keen with preparation and abstract design, other just want to code and let the coding process bring them somewhere. But the materialistic software world would call that a 'hack'. To me, its not. That word doesn't make any sense here. Why can't the mistakes, bugs, weird design decisions, unplanned diasasters that are barely corrected, the human neurosis and error be part of the beauty?


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