Steve Kudlak
Since 2004
Works in Watsonville, California United States of America

BIO
I have a BS in Biocehmistry and BA in Art with a concentration in Printmaking. Recently I have become interested in digital media. When I get a webpage done I will post the info
Discussions (71) Opportunities (0) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Boxer


I dunno this is another one of those critcs that should happily go live in
Singapore or some place where throwing chewing gum opn the sidewalk gets
you shot at dawn.

My big question is why some artists and some people seem to tamke a
particular joy in making us uncomfortable. There has got to be a reason or
is that "washout from the 20th Century wherein mindless despair was oh so
in and popular" often preached by those who would go on to do quite well.

Have Fun,
Sends Steve

> Matthew Mascotte wrote:
>
>> FYI-
>>
>> Boxer's trouncing of Boston Cyberarts festival
>> is at:
>>
>> http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/27/arts/design/27cybe.html
>
>
> there is very little that makes me want to be an artist less than this
> article.
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
>

DISCUSSION

Art and The Law


I am intrerested in talking to any artists of curators who have had any
legal trouble. This includes anything from "Officer Friendly Dropping By
With A Little Kindly Advice" to full blown civil or criminal threats. I am
also interested in these things in other parts of the world other than the
US, CANADA. AUSTRALIA and the UK.

Awhile ado I have heard of the still ongoing Steve Kurtz and CAE Case,
here in the US, which is heating up again because there has been another
Grand Jury Subpoena for another CAE Member Steve Barnes is subpoena'd
before the Grand Jury. It is an open question if the FBI and Federal
Prosecutors will try to get a "bioterrorism" indictment. Note well
although the current indictment was for mail fraud because Steve Kurtz and
Robert Ferrel went around some fussy procedures that one supplier of
Microrganisms uses. Note University Labs do this all the time.

What is sad in this case is that with a little searching on the Internet
Steve Kurtz could have ordered the Microganisms he wanted. After the Grand
Jury failed to find a true bill on bioterrorism it would have all
collapsed.

Note to those artists who want to do "out there" stuff please make sure
that you do everything on the up and up and be reasonably careful. All of
this started me reading through Federal Court Cases and what I became
interested in was the "not so little consolation prizes" that Federal
Prosecutors seem to often get. In this case "Mail Fraud". What happens is
that when something is a federal case. They everything you have, letters,
computer files, stuff laying around your house etc. and if the main thing
fails what seems to happen as far as I can tell is they go looking through
everything to find out if this person could have possibly done anything
wrong and nail 'em for that. Or that is what from my now extended layman's
understanding.

I have always been interested in the CAE type stuff as I am another one of
those folks who had a major in biology and art. I think in this case what
people should do is point out where it is possible to legitmately get kind
of neat science and art materials and their safe use and any laws one
might trip over. Note in the old days where painters compounded their own
pigments tha artists dealt with toxic materials all the time. Painters
primed their caanvases with white lead, which when mixed looks like a kind
of creamy shake but is very toxic. So I am sure we artists and techies can
deal with this sort of stuff.

But this has piqued my interest in general, how many art types have had
encounters with the legal system. I am going to add improvements to the
Santa Cruz Bill of Right Defense Comittee web site as we have discussed in
meeting and I would foresee adding a moderately big subsection as art is
major part of our freedom of expression.

If you wish to contact me off list feel free to do so by mailing to either:
steve.kudlak@cruzrights.org or chromazine@sbcglobal.net /

Thank You and Have Fun,
Sends Steve Kudlak

DISCUSSION

Re: [Locative] Re: RHIZOME_RAW: Know Where You Are


A neat tool/toy lives here: http://www.fourmilab.ch/cgi-bin/uncgi/Earth
Another neat toy that is more like a tool for me when teaching kids about
the weather is:
http://weatherpixie.com/index.php?htm=0&page=map&trooper=1&type=&long1.78&lat6.93
There is also: http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/nexsat_pages/nexsat_home.html
but a little what it is like outside. OF course there are other things
like GlobeExplorer and Terra Explorer if you are really into this sort of
stuff. I am still figuring how to meld Science, Art and Personal Being.

Have Fun,
Sends Steve

> Hello
>
> I was recently contacted by a person who works in environmental science.
> this is how he descibes his work, he "needs accurate geo-referencing to
> provide precise point-source locations for observations and data on
> terrain,
> soils, climate, vagetation, cultural inforamtion and economic conditions.
> He
> uses the data to develope descriptive, explanatory and predictive models
> that relate the different layers of spatial informations."
> whilst we were talking about GPS information i said that the data itself
> is
> meaningless without other references, which is similar to this discussion
> of
> location - knowing that i'm at N54.05038 W-2.80179 doesnt really tell
> me
> anything. But he has worked with this data for so long, that he would know
> roughly where that was, because he's worked with this data in many
> different
> locations across the north of england, and the world.
> I've never met anyone who can really 'read' GPS data, without software to
> relate it to a location. Usually i'm thinking about recreational users of
> GPS, not professional users - like the park rangers, or mountain rescue
> people that Jen H mentioned. As with any other information, its more about
> having the experience to read it. The environmental scientist I spoke to
> has
> the relative databank in his own memory - linked to GPS data, rather than
> on
> a device.
>
>
> Jen
>
> Jen Southern
> Www.theportable.tv
>
>
>> Hi Ivan,
>> Well, I'm a little more concerned these days with taking a location and
>> transforming it into a non-location. But of course to achieve the "know
>> where you are" factor you have to include some sort of universally
>> familiar element. Like a landmark that everyone (or at least whoever has
>> to understand the location) knows. Of course, it would be interesting to
>> know what the world might be like if we could attain the kind of
>> automatic familiarity with numerical location identifiers that we have
>> with small numbers. Like when we see three trees in a park, we don't
>> have to count them. We just look and know that what we see is three. So
>> if we could just look at a set of coordinates and immediately picture
>> that coordinates surrounding area, but I don't really see that happening
>> in the near future.
>>
>> Ivan Pope wrote:
>>> Hi Pall,
>>> Yes, I know of course, GPS information doesn't tell you 'where you
>>> are'.
>>> I wasn't really connecting the two in a literal sense. I just had this
>>> thought that knowing where you are might be a fundamental human right
>>> that is worth talking about. Thinking about this raises exactly the
>>> issue you raise: what information do you need to 'know where you are'.
>>> I'm interested in chrono-geography. That is, I like to look at location
>>> and time. There's another layer on knowing where you are, i.e. what
>>> date
>>> are you at etc.
>>> I'm interested in theoretical aspects of location and psychogeography.
>>> How would you define the information that anyone should be given in
>>> order that they 'know where they are'.
>>> Cheers,
>>> Ivan
>>>
>>> Pall Thayer wrote:
>>>
>>>>> Following a GPS visit to the Isle of Wight last week, I was wondering
>>>>> what the point of universal GPS was and where it would lead us. I had
>>>>> a huge thought: Knowing where you are is a fundamental human right.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> True, it is a fundamental right. No one should be made to suffer the
>>>> perils of not knowing where they are. But the fundamental question
>>>> here is, "Does a GPS device tell us where we are?"
>>>>
>>>> How do we define location? If I tell you, in a casual phone
>>>> conversation (while you are sitting at a cafe with no maps on you),
>>>> that I'm at N58 24.10 E10 18.20, does that tell you where I am?
>>>>
>>>> If I'm lost in the desert somewhere and my trusty GPS device tells me
>>>> my coordinates, I'm no better off unless I can supplement it with
>>>> additional information and if I can, a simple compass would do me just
>>>> as much good.
>>>>
>>>> On the other hand, I might be able to tell you during our phone
>>>> conversation that to my left is a wide river, on the other side of the
>>>> river is big old church. On my right is a street with some
>>>> restaurants. Do you know where I am? Do I know where I am?
>>>>
>>>> Pall
>>>>
>>>> Ivan Pope wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Following a GPS visit to the Isle of Wight last week, I was wondering
>>>>> what the point of universal GPS was and where it would lead us. I had
>>>>> a huge thought: Knowing where you are is a fundamental human right.
>>>>>
>>>>> We take this for granted as we generally know where we are.
>>>>> Who might not know where they are? Prisoners, patients, soldiers,
>>>>> children, workers, passengers --
>>>>> What do we mean by 'where we are'? I am in a University of Brighton
>>>>> lecture room, in the sculpture department, in the Grand Parade
>>>>> buildings, in south Brighton, in Brighton, on the south coast, in
>>>>> East Sussex, in Sussex, in the South East, in the South of England,
>>>>> in England, in Great Britain, in the United Kingdom, in norther
>>>>> Europe, in Europe, in the norther hemisphere, in the west, in the
>>>>> first world, on Earth -- etc
>>>>>
>>>>> How can we ensure we know where we are? What steps need to be taken
>>>>> to ensure people know where they are? What are the effects of not
>>>>> knowing where you are?
>>>>>
>>>>> Is the right to know where you are anywhere enshrined in law?
>>>>>
>>>>> And while I'm on the subject:
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm doing two GPS for Artists workshops with SCAN
>>>>> <http://www.scansite.org/scan.php?pid30>on Feb 19th at Quay Arts,
>>>>> Isle of Weight and on March 12 at New Greenham Arts so if you fancy a
>>>>> free day out with a GPS unit and a camera and an introduction to GPS
>>>>> for artists, please book up now.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> GPS for Artists, Ivan Pope workshop, 19/2/05 Quay Arts, Isle of
>>>>> Wight,
>>>>> UK; 12/3/05 New Greenham Arts, Berkshire UK
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Places still available and it is free to attend. Booking essential.
>>>>> Phone 01590 682824
>>>>>
>>>>> Ivan Pope presents A Locative Day Out
>>>>>
>>>>> The satellite based Global Positioning System (GPS) allows us to
>>>>> record basic information about their location, direction, altitude
>>>>> and speed. Using small hand held devices, artists can record and
>>>>> interpret this data to create mapping, locative, durational and other
>>>>> works. GPS allows us to take back knowledge of our whereabouts, and
>>>>> to annotate this knowledge, or to reuse it as we wish.
>>>>>
>>>>> Artists can use access to this locative data that forms the
>>>>> background to all our lives, to add another layer of information to
>>>>> work. Whether we want accurate information or chaotic disinformation,
>>>>> the gps satellites transmit unceasingly 24 hours a day, not caring
>>>>> whether we make use of their datastreams or not. We can anonymously
>>>>> take up their offering and convert it to human data.
>>>>>
>>>>> This one day live workshop will introduce the basic functioning of
>>>>> the GPS and demonstrate GPS devices and software along with digital
>>>>> cameras. Participants will be able to use GPS devices and digital
>>>>> cameras in the field to create their own personal mappings of the
>>>>> locality. These mappings will form the basis for a workshop in
>>>>> creating combined and annotated maps and images.
>>>>>
>>>>> We will spend the day looking at software and hardware and discussing
>>>>> psychogeographic and locative issues while making our own maps,
>>>>> playing gps games and adding to the global store of waypoints.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>
> --
>
>
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
>

DISCUSSION

Re: [Locative] Re: RHIZOME_RAW: Know Where You Are


When I say you locatiomn. UK popped right into my head I am at
approximately 121.78W36.59W (decimal notation). I am not as good as my
astrology loving friend who could do sexigesimal arithmetic in my head. I
could see this as sort of a weirdass geeky skill to have. I could see some
artists having it too as it opens the door to fascinating things and
questions like how we view ourselves and where we are.

Have Fun,
Sends Steve

> Hello
>
> I was recently contacted by a person who works in environmental science.
> this is how he descibes his work, he "needs accurate geo-referencing to
> provide precise point-source locations for observations and data on
> terrain,
> soils, climate, vagetation, cultural inforamtion and economic conditions.
> He
> uses the data to develope descriptive, explanatory and predictive models
> that relate the different layers of spatial informations."
> whilst we were talking about GPS information i said that the data itself
> is
> meaningless without other references, which is similar to this discussion
> of
> location - knowing that i'm at N54.05038 W-2.80179 doesnt really tell
> me
> anything. But he has worked with this data for so long, that he would know
> roughly where that was, because he's worked with this data in many
> different
> locations across the north of england, and the world.
> I've never met anyone who can really 'read' GPS data, without software to
> relate it to a location. Usually i'm thinking about recreational users of
> GPS, not professional users - like the park rangers, or mountain rescue
> people that Jen H mentioned. As with any other information, its more about
> having the experience to read it. The environmental scientist I spoke to
> has
> the relative databank in his own memory - linked to GPS data, rather than
> on
> a device.
>
>
> Jen
>
> Jen Southern
> Www.theportable.tv
>
>
>> Hi Ivan,
>> Well, I'm a little more concerned these days with taking a location and
>> transforming it into a non-location. But of course to achieve the "know
>> where you are" factor you have to include some sort of universally
>> familiar element. Like a landmark that everyone (or at least whoever has
>> to understand the location) knows. Of course, it would be interesting to
>> know what the world might be like if we could attain the kind of
>> automatic familiarity with numerical location identifiers that we have
>> with small numbers. Like when we see three trees in a park, we don't
>> have to count them. We just look and know that what we see is three. So
>> if we could just look at a set of coordinates and immediately picture
>> that coordinates surrounding area, but I don't really see that happening
>> in the near future.
>>
>> Ivan Pope wrote:
>>> Hi Pall,
>>> Yes, I know of course, GPS information doesn't tell you 'where you
>>> are'.
>>> I wasn't really connecting the two in a literal sense. I just had this
>>> thought that knowing where you are might be a fundamental human right
>>> that is worth talking about. Thinking about this raises exactly the
>>> issue you raise: what information do you need to 'know where you are'.
>>> I'm interested in chrono-geography. That is, I like to look at location
>>> and time. There's another layer on knowing where you are, i.e. what
>>> date
>>> are you at etc.
>>> I'm interested in theoretical aspects of location and psychogeography.
>>> How would you define the information that anyone should be given in
>>> order that they 'know where they are'.
>>> Cheers,
>>> Ivan
>>>
>>> Pall Thayer wrote:
>>>
>>>>> Following a GPS visit to the Isle of Wight last week, I was wondering
>>>>> what the point of universal GPS was and where it would lead us. I had
>>>>> a huge thought: Knowing where you are is a fundamental human right.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> True, it is a fundamental right. No one should be made to suffer the
>>>> perils of not knowing where they are. But the fundamental question
>>>> here is, "Does a GPS device tell us where we are?"
>>>>
>>>> How do we define location? If I tell you, in a casual phone
>>>> conversation (while you are sitting at a cafe with no maps on you),
>>>> that I'm at N58 24.10 E10 18.20, does that tell you where I am?
>>>>
>>>> If I'm lost in the desert somewhere and my trusty GPS device tells me
>>>> my coordinates, I'm no better off unless I can supplement it with
>>>> additional information and if I can, a simple compass would do me just
>>>> as much good.
>>>>
>>>> On the other hand, I might be able to tell you during our phone
>>>> conversation that to my left is a wide river, on the other side of the
>>>> river is big old church. On my right is a street with some
>>>> restaurants. Do you know where I am? Do I know where I am?
>>>>
>>>> Pall
>>>>
>>>> Ivan Pope wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Following a GPS visit to the Isle of Wight last week, I was wondering
>>>>> what the point of universal GPS was and where it would lead us. I had
>>>>> a huge thought: Knowing where you are is a fundamental human right.
>>>>>
>>>>> We take this for granted as we generally know where we are.
>>>>> Who might not know where they are? Prisoners, patients, soldiers,
>>>>> children, workers, passengers --
>>>>> What do we mean by 'where we are'? I am in a University of Brighton
>>>>> lecture room, in the sculpture department, in the Grand Parade
>>>>> buildings, in south Brighton, in Brighton, on the south coast, in
>>>>> East Sussex, in Sussex, in the South East, in the South of England,
>>>>> in England, in Great Britain, in the United Kingdom, in norther
>>>>> Europe, in Europe, in the norther hemisphere, in the west, in the
>>>>> first world, on Earth -- etc
>>>>>
>>>>> How can we ensure we know where we are? What steps need to be taken
>>>>> to ensure people know where they are? What are the effects of not
>>>>> knowing where you are?
>>>>>
>>>>> Is the right to know where you are anywhere enshrined in law?
>>>>>
>>>>> And while I'm on the subject:
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm doing two GPS for Artists workshops with SCAN
>>>>> <http://www.scansite.org/scan.php?pid30>on Feb 19th at Quay Arts,
>>>>> Isle of Weight and on March 12 at New Greenham Arts so if you fancy a
>>>>> free day out with a GPS unit and a camera and an introduction to GPS
>>>>> for artists, please book up now.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> GPS for Artists, Ivan Pope workshop, 19/2/05 Quay Arts, Isle of
>>>>> Wight,
>>>>> UK; 12/3/05 New Greenham Arts, Berkshire UK
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Places still available and it is free to attend. Booking essential.
>>>>> Phone 01590 682824
>>>>>
>>>>> Ivan Pope presents A Locative Day Out
>>>>>
>>>>> The satellite based Global Positioning System (GPS) allows us to
>>>>> record basic information about their location, direction, altitude
>>>>> and speed. Using small hand held devices, artists can record and
>>>>> interpret this data to create mapping, locative, durational and other
>>>>> works. GPS allows us to take back knowledge of our whereabouts, and
>>>>> to annotate this knowledge, or to reuse it as we wish.
>>>>>
>>>>> Artists can use access to this locative data that forms the
>>>>> background to all our lives, to add another layer of information to
>>>>> work. Whether we want accurate information or chaotic disinformation,
>>>>> the gps satellites transmit unceasingly 24 hours a day, not caring
>>>>> whether we make use of their datastreams or not. We can anonymously
>>>>> take up their offering and convert it to human data.
>>>>>
>>>>> This one day live workshop will introduce the basic functioning of
>>>>> the GPS and demonstrate GPS devices and software along with digital
>>>>> cameras. Participants will be able to use GPS devices and digital
>>>>> cameras in the field to create their own personal mappings of the
>>>>> locality. These mappings will form the basis for a workshop in
>>>>> creating combined and annotated maps and images.
>>>>>
>>>>> We will spend the day looking at software and hardware and discussing
>>>>> psychogeographic and locative issues while making our own maps,
>>>>> playing gps games and adding to the global store of waypoints.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>
> --
>
>
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
>

DISCUSSION

Speaking of Court Cases ......and things on the edge


Does anyone remember one from the Pacific Northwest where somebody in
Cypherpunkland proposed a sort of "Anonymous Political Assination Plot"
that used some sort of anonmymous cash or encryption verification plan. I
believe the person get actually get successfully proscuted for what was a
albeit very scary thought crime. The idea was a secure payment of
$50,000.00 to get rid of someone.

Note the ill that Steve Kurtz supposedly did was be a slightly bad boy and
mention a few scary things in reference to Performance Art in scary times.
he did not directly propose doing ill to people.

Have Fun,
Sends Steve