SARIKA GOULATIA
Since 2005
Works in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania United States of America

BIO
“Every little work of art however humble can be a creative act”
- The Bhagavad-Gita

As an artist, I am stirred and enthused by the roads I have traveled and the journeys I have undertaken as a woman, a designer and an entrepreneur. These travels through the various walks of life directly or indirectly inspire my work. My work therefore, has a narrative feel to it, but the emotions and feelings depicted or evoked by the works are not necessarily singled out as mine alone. They relate to the human being. Through my body of work I address the social construction of human identity and related issues of social conditioning, most often through the narrative construct of an altered sense of self as the "driving force."

Even though I am drawn to the dissimilarities between the genders and the perception of the female as an equal. I am fascinated by the illusion that the female is as physically strong as the male and I have always lived my life in that belief. But my work is very often that of the human being and is not gender related. To me the two dissolve as one and I cease to see them as different. Both the male and the female are just simply human struggling in their own way to bear the burden of life and striving to move on.

The use of nails in the installation Dissolving Self evokes powerful, strong feelings and reactions. The figure represents a human being purposefully striding ahead adjusting to the difficulties and problems encountered in everyday life. I feel I embody this spirit for I am forever ready to tackle anything new with as much gusto despite all the odds.

My work is a reflection of me losing my father at a young age and always trying to reach back to him through the medium of art. It depicts human suffering and the limitations of the human body. The human being is constantly tormented physically or emotionally and is forever struggling to get out of the web of “being judged” by other humans or a higher being. I have a penchant for depicting suffering and this manifests in Many Faces one of my ceramic installations. The installation represents loss and failure, which in the end makes us strong.

I am fascinated by technology and how we as humans are slaves of the television as depicted in Vegetative Meditative, a video installation. Digital tools and cinematic metaphors that reflect our time, such as privacy in an era of surveillance, personal identity in a time of all-encompassing exploitation, have always intrigued me. In Psychedelia I represent distortion of reality by the process of over-digitization.

My work at this point is experimental and exploratory. I am searching for ways to integrate the different mediums and create a cohesive body of work.