ryan griffis
Since 2002
Works in United States of America

PORTFOLIO (4)
BIO
Ryan Griffis currently teaches new media art at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He often works under the name Temporary Travel Office and collaborates with many other writers, artists, activists and interesting people in the Midwest Radical Culture Corridor.
The Temporary Travel Office produces a variety of services relating to tourism and technology aimed at exploring the non-rational connections existing between public and private spaces. The Travel Office has operated in a variety of locations, including Missouri, Chicago, Southern California and Norway.

Is MySpace a Place?


Networked Performance pointed me toward an interview (download in PDF)with Networked Publics speaker Henry Jenkins and Networked Publics friend danah boyd about Myspace. The site, popular with teenagers, has become increasingly controversial as parents and the press raise concerns about the openness of information on the site and the vulnerability this supposedly poses to predators (Henry points out that only .1% of abductions are by strangers) and the behavior of teens towards each other (certainly nothing new, only now in persistent form). In another essay on Identity Production in Networked Culture, danah suggests that Myspace is popular not only because the technology makes new forms of interaction possible, but because older hang-outs such as the mall and the convenience store are prohibiting teens from congregating and roller rinks and burger joints are disappearing.

This begs the question, is Myspace media or is it space? Architecture theorists have long had this thorn in their side. "This will kill that," wrote Victor Hugo with respect to the book and the building. In the early 1990s, concern about a dwindling public culture and the character of late twentieth century urban space led us to investigate Jürgen Habermas's idea of the public sphere. But the public sphere, for Habermas is a forum, something that, for the most part, emerges in media and in the institutions of the state:

The bourgeois public sphere may be conceived above all as the sphere of private people come together as a public; they soon claimed the public sphere regulated from above against the public authorities themselves, to engage them in a debate over the general rules governing relations in the basically privatized but publicly relevant sphere of commodity exchange and social labor. The medium of this political confrontation was peculiar and without historical precedent: people's ...

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SWITCH: Issue 22



Carlos Castellanos:

HI everyone. Just wanted to announce the new issue of SWITCH:

SWITCH : The online New Media Art Journal of the CADRE Laboratory for
New Media at San Jose State University

http://switch.sjsu.edu switch@cadre.sjsu.edu

SWITCH Journal is proud to announce the launch of Issue 22: A Special
Preview Edition to ISEA 2006/ ZeroOne San Jose.

As San Jose State University and the CADRE Laboratory are serving as
the academic host for the ZeroOne San Jose /ISEA 2006 Symposium,
SWITCH has dedicated itself to serving as an official media
correspondent of the Festival and Symposium. SWITCH has focused the
past three issues of publication prior to ZeroOne San Jose/ISEA2006
on publishing content reflecting on the themes of the symposium. Our
editorial staff has interviewed and reported on artists, theorists,
and practitioners interested in the intersections of Art & Technology
as related to the themes of ZeroOne San Jose/ ISEA 2006. While some
of those featured in SWITCH are part of the festival and symposium,
others provide a complimentary perspective.

Issue 22 focuses on the intersections of CADRE and ZeroOne San Jose/
ISEA 2006. Over the past year, students at the CADRE Laboratory for
New Media have been working intensely with artists on two different
residency projects for the festival – “Social Networking” with Antoni
Muntadas and the City as Interface Residency, “Karaoke Ice” with
Nancy Nowacek, Marina Zurkow & Katie Salen. Carlos Castellanos,
James Morgan, Aaron Siegel, all give us a sneak preview of their
projects which will be featured at the ISEA 2006 exhibition. Alumni
Sheila Malone introduces ex_XX:: post position, an exhibition
celebrating the 20th anniversary of the CADRE Institute that will run
as a parallel exhibition to ZeroOne San Jose/ ISEA 2006. LeE
Montgomery provides a preview of NPR (Neighborhood Public Radio)
presence at ...

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Art & Mapping



The North American Cartographic Information Society (NACIS) has released a special issue of their journal, Cartographic Perspectives:
Art and Mapping Issue 53, Winter 2006 Edited by Denis Wood and and John Krygier Price: $25
The issue includes articles by kanarinka, Denis Wood, Dalia Varanka and John Krygier, and an extensive catalogue of map artists compiled by Denis Wood.

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[-empyre-] Liquid Narrative for June 2006


Christina McPhee:

hi all, I am not sure we got this message out to Rhizome!

Please join our guests this month, Dene Grigar (US), Jim Barrett
(AU/SE), Lucio Santaella (BR), and Sergio Basbaum (BR) , with
moderator Marcus Bastos (BR), for a spirited discussion of "Liquid
Narratives" ----- digital media story telling with a dash, perhaps,
of 'aura' .

Here's the intro from Marcus:

The topic of June at the - empyre - mailing list will be Liquid Narratives. The concept of 'liquid narrative' is interesting in that it allows to think about the unfoldings of contemporary languages beyond tech achievements, by relating user controlled applications with formats such as the essay (as described by Adorno in "Der Essay als Form", The essay as a form) and procedures related to the figure of the narrator (as described by Benjamin in his writings about Nikolai Leskov). Both authors are accute critics of modern culture, but a lot of his ideas can be expanded towards contemporary culture. As a matter of fact, one of the main concerns in Benjamin's essay is a description of how the rise of modernism happens on account of an increasing nprivilege of information over knowledge, which is even more intense nowadays. To understand this proposal, it is important to remember how Benjamin distinguishes between an oral oriented knowledge, that results from 'an experience that goes from person to person' and is sometimes anonymous, from the information and authoritative oriented print culture. One of the aspects of this discussion is how contemporary networked culture rescues this 'person to person' dimension, given the distributed and non-authoritative procedures that technologies such as the GPS, mobile phones and others stimulate.

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state of the planet infographics


stateoftheplanet.jpg
a small collection of beautiful information graphics documenting the current state of the planet.
see also gapminder & 3d data globe.
[seedmagazine.com]

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Discussions (909) Opportunities (7) Events (16) Jobs (0)
EVENT

The Audacity of Desperation (Los Angeles)


Dates:
Mon Oct 13, 2008 00:00 - Tue Oct 14, 2008

After visits to rural Illinois and New York City ,The Audacity of Desperation arrives in Los Angeles at Sea and Space Explorations, October 26 through November 16, 2008.

Gallery Hours: Saturday and Sunday, 1-5 PM Or call 323-445-4015 to make an appointment. http://www.seaandspace.org email: info@seaandspace.org

DIRECTIONS from Los Angeles: From the 5, take the 2 north. Take the Verdugo Road exit. Left onto Eagle Rock Boulevard. Right onto York Boulevard (major cross street is Armadale Boulevard).

Organized by Jessica Lawless and Sarah Ross, more than 40 socially engaged local and international artists address the depressed state of politics, anti-war activism, and the economy accrued by eight years of the current Bush administration. Taking to heart the idea that random acts of kindness are central to social change, each artist has made a work of art in multiple editions visitors to the exhibition can take away. The Audacity of Desperation creates a free exchange of ideas that challenges the culture at large as well as the international art market of which Los Angles has become a central location.

The exhibition includes a series of events addressing the Nov. 4th elections:

Sunday October 26: Exchange Rate: 2008 presents performances in the gallery space. Exchange Rate: 2008 is an international performance exchange organized by artist Elana Mann in response to the US presidential elections and includes artists from Brazil, Denmark, Israel, Mexico, South Korea, Ukraine, and the US among others. 6-8pm

Saturday Nov. 1:
Evil Dead 8: the end is near, a Day of the Dead inspired memorial for the final days of the Bush administration. Celebrating the end of one evil while not knowing what is lurking ahead, Evil Dead 8 includes skill sharing, music, dancing, a bookmobile project created by Irina Contreras and Kelly Besser called The Miracle, and guerilla interventions by AK-Ami and her mother Maleeka Kobrah. 8pm

Tuesday November 4: Election returns will be projected in the gallery with several of the participating artists present and Lee Azzarello and Sarah Kanouse "Voices of America” internet radio project will be broadcast. 5pm on

Saturday November 8: FOCUS Group Findings -- What Now?
Jeff Foye and Gordon Winiemko, present their findings from focus groups staged this summer as part of Trade and Row’s Campaign Trail project. The duo solicited ideas about ways artists can reclaim their power in the political process. Stay for a dance party following the presentation. 8pm

Sunday November 9:
A screening of video works that address the numerous political disasters, violations and obfuscations of the past eight years. Curated by Nancy Popp. 6-8pm

Sunday November 16:
“So now what?” or “HOLY FUCK! NOW WHAT?” Whether it is Obama/Biden or McCain/Palin, immediately after the elections we’re still in debt, looking for work, without universal health care, and occupying Iraq. Adam Overton and Nancy Popp facilitate conversation and activities that will lead to concrete actions to make change in our own communities. 2-5pm

Artists in the exhibit:
AK-Ami, William Brown, David Sanchez Burr, CaFF, Chris Christion, Ryan Claypool/Austin Smythe, Heidi Cunningham, Anna Campbell, solidad decosta, Alexis Disselkoen, Von Edwards, Nicky Enright, Feel Tank Chicago, Dara Greenwald/Josh MacPhee/Steve Lambert with the Anti-Advertising Agency, Russell Howze, Jill Jeannides, Anné M. Klint, Caroline Kelley, Sarah Kanouse/Tianna Kennedy/Lee Azzerello, Norene Leddy/Ed Bringas, Let's Re-Make, Steven Lam, the League of Imaginary Scientists, DJ Lightbolt, Diran Lyons, Elana Mann, Glendalys Medina, Tomas A. Moreno, Anne Elizabeth Moore, Doug Minkler, Mahyar Nili, Taisha Paggett and Ashley Hunt, Robert T. Pannell, Sheila Pinkel, Nancy Popp, Lizabeth Eva Rossof, Anthony Rayson, Nino Rodriguez, Lián Amaris Sifuentes, Rick Salafia, simon strikeback, Dorothy Schultz, Heath Schultz/Brad Thomson, Lisa Tucker, Tammy Jo Wilson, Gordon Winiemko, Xtine, Carrie Yury

About Sea and Space:
Sea and Space Explorations was founded by its current director, Lara Bank (MFA CalArts) in June 2007. Operating as an artwork in and of itself, Sea and Space is redefined each time it hosts artwork, statements, and the thoughts of other artists, guest curators, lecturers and collaborators.

About Exchange Rate 2008:
Exchange Rate 2008 (http://exchangerate2008.com/blog/) is sponsored by Trade&Row (www.tradeandrow.org ) with in-kind support from Side Street Projects (www.sidestreet.org ).

About Voices of America:
"Voices of America" is sponsored by free103point9 . The project is part of The UnConvention , a non-partisan, Minneapolis-based collective of artists and citizens acting as a counterpoint to the highly scripted and predetermined nature of the contemporary presidential nomination process and convention. For more info: http://thevoa.net/


EVENT

The Audacity of Desperation


Dates:
Sun Oct 26, 2008 00:00 - Thu Sep 25, 2008

The Audacity of Desperation, an art exhibit that has traveled through rural Illinois and New York City, opens in Los Angeles Sunday October 26, 2008 at Sea and Space Explorations. The show runs October 26 through November 16, 2008.

Organized by Jessica Lawless and Sarah Ross, more than 40 socially engaged local and international artists address the depressed state of politics, anti-war activism, and the economy accrued by eight years of the current Bush administration. Taking to heart the idea that random acts of kindness are central to social change, each artist has made a work of art in multiple editions visitors to the exhibition can take away. The Audacity of Desperation creates a free exchange of ideas that challenges the culture at large as well as the international art market of which Los Angles has become a central location.

The exhibition includes a series of events addressing the Nov. 4th elections:

Sunday October 26: Exchange Rate: 2008 presents performances in the gallery space. Exchange Rate: 2008 is an international performance exchange organized by artist Elana Mann in response to the US presidential elections and includes artists from Brazil, Denmark, Israel, Mexico, South Korea, Ukraine, and the US among others. 6-8pm

Saturday Nov. 1: Evil Dead 8: the end is near, a Day of the Dead inspired memorial for the final days of the Bush administration. Celebrating the end of one evil while not knowing what is lurking ahead, Evil Dead 8 includes skill sharing, music, dancing, a bookmobile project created by Irina Contreras and Kelly Besser called The Miracle, and guerilla interventions by AK-Ami and her mother Maleeka Kobrah. 8pm

Tuesday November 4: Election returns will be projected in the gallery with several of the participating artists present and Lee Azzarello and Sarah Kanouse "Voices of America” internet radio project will be broadcast.
5pm on

Saturday November 8: FOCUS Group Findings -- What Now?
Jeff Foye and Gordon Winiemko, present their findings from focus groups staged this summer as part of Trade and Row’s Campaign Trail project. The duo solicited ideas about ways artists can reclaim their power in the political process. Stay for a dance party following the presentation. 8pm

Sunday November 9: A screening of video works that address the numerous political disasters, violations and obfuscations of the past eight years. Curated by Nancy Popp. 6-8pm

Sunday November 16: “So now what?” or “HOLY FUCK! NOW WHAT?” Whether it is Obama/Biden or McCain/Palin, immediately after the elections we’re still in debt, looking for work, without universal health care, and occupying Iraq. Adam Overton and Nancy Popp facilitate conversation and activities that will lead to concrete actions to make change in our own communities. 2-5pm

Why are we so desperate?
The Audacity of Desperation is a collaborative response to the reality that our political system is fraught with inequities and dangerous contradictions. In November, 2008, “the worst president in history” will finally be voted out of the White House. How do we make sense of a presidential race where a black man who rose to prominence as a community organizer faces criticism for elitism, where a rich white woman is a working class hero, and where the 18 million cracks in the glass ceiling did not resuscitate feminism, but instead left us with a gun-toting, anti abortion, evangelical pin-up girl turned hockey mom VP candidate?

Even as Barack Obama successfully engages a younger generation, our desperation grows. For many of us born in the wake of the assassinations of JFK, RFK, MLK and Malcolm X, our first political memory falls somewhere between Nixon's resignation and Bill Clinton's lies about having sex with Monica Lewinsky. Belief in revolutionary change through electoral politics is a hard sell. And yet, Obama's seductive oratory style also captures the hopes of our generation, instilling nostalgia for social movements we can't remember. So what do we do when the veneer has dulled?

In Los Angeles, the events accompanying The Audacity of Desperation facilitate the question of “what now” while also exploring possibilities for action. Throughout it’s run, The Audacity of Desperation explores ways desperation itself can be re-imagined as a tool for political organizing. We ask: How do we connect communities, select alliances, and establish new coalitions as old models of protest based on identity are no longer useful? Can we wallow in our desperation and still find creative ways to make systemic changes on our terms?

Artists in the exhibit:
AK-Ami, William Brown, David Sanchez Burr, CaFF, Chris Christion, Ryan Claypool/Austin Smythe, Heidi Cunningham, Anna Campbell, solidad decosta, Alexis Disselkoen, Von Edwards, Nicky Enright, Feel Tank Chicago, Dara Greenwald/Josh MacPhee/Steve Lambert with the Anti-Advertising Agency, Russell Howze, Jill Jeannides, Anné M. Klint, Caroline Kelley, Sarah Kanouse/Tianna Kennedy/Lee Azzerello, Norene Leddy/Ed Bringas, Let's Re-Make, Steven Lam, the League of Imaginary Scientists, DJ Lightbolt, Diran Lyons, Elana Mann, Glendalys Medina, Tomas A. Moreno, Anne Elizabeth Moore, Doug Minkler, Mahyar Nili, Taisha Paggett and Ashley Hunt, Robert T. Pannell, Sheila Pinkel, Nancy Popp, Lizabeth Eva Rossof, Anthony Rayson, Nino Rodriguez, Lián Amaris Sifuentes, Rick Salafia, simon strikeback, Dorothy Schultz, Heath Schultz/Brad Thomson, Lisa Tucker, Tammy Jo Wilson, Gordon Winiemko, Xtine, Carrie Yury


EVENT

Bakyard Party


Dates:
Sat Aug 23, 2008 00:00 - Thu Aug 21, 2008

ELADJPM panels #5

Part of the “Featuring the Lightz and Soundz of...” Exhibition @ g727

These discussions revolve around the concept of exploring and archiving DJ
culture from ELA. The panels are designed to capture testimonies from
leaders of the DJ movement from the present, past and future so their
history can be included in future discussions of the west coast and global
dance scene and Chicano cultural production.

ELDJPM Panel 5 Saturday, August 23rd 630pm

Artist as DJ

This discussion will feature three Southern California artists who will
explore concepts of performance art, turntablism and music theory. The
panelist will offer a dynamic dialogue intermixed with sound and sampled
tracks in front of a house located in the historic community of Boyle
Heights. The audience will be encouraged to bring a blanket or a lawn chair
for this event!

Moderated by Adrian Rivas

Panelist:

Cindy Bravo, visual/sound artist
Roberto Freeman, photographer/sound artist
Sergio Zenteno, visual/performance artist

Details:
Please arrive at 6:30 pm
Panel starts 7:45 pm sharp!
Backyard Party starts at 9pm-???

@
420 South Boyle Ave. (near corner of 4th and Boyle)
LA, CA 90033
323 683 6640

Please bring a blanket!!!
The panel discussion will be on the lawn in front of our house!!!
Tamales and Tecate will be served
BYOB is also advised for all you folks that don't like Tecate.

http://www.g727.org
http://www.kcet.com/explore-ca/web-stories


DISCUSSION

Copyright, Artists and Continentalism


i don't know what i mean with the title, but the reason for this post is: i was at a symposium the other day and a Spanish art institution director made a very passing remark to the effect that artists are the most strident defenders of copyright while cultural institutions are supporting copyleft/copyfight principles.
i immediately, and without realizing it, yelled out "are you kidding?"
afterwards, i approached him about this asking where the hell he gets his information and (snarkely) has he ever heard of creative commons and looked at its support base (while also acknowledging that CC is not exactly copyleft, but is certainly a practical move towards it for many).
His response was, "You are wrong. Artists do not support copyleft."
My response, "Huh? Yeah, you said that already, that's what I'm trying to debate with you."
He ended up suggesting that the situation in Europe was extremely different, with cultural institutions being largely state supported, thus generating a condition where cultural institutions (effectively, the state) benefited more from freely distributed cultural capital than artists. Of course, the context is different in North America, he conceded.
But that seems very narrowly defined in terms of "high" culture and doesn't really address the contradictions of how cultural institutions operate often on the cheap acquisitions of goods and labor. Artists, esp in the US are frequently providers of cheap (sometimes even self-subsidized) content and labor for institutions (including the many artists who work as preparators and handlers for, often, $10-15/hour, on call). The whole critique of web2.0 labor relations could be leveled at most non-profit art institutions in the US. Which isn't an attack on the orgs... i've been on both sides of the programming/content provider divide.
Maybe i'm just being lazy, but i'm wondering what the NA/EU folks on this list have to say about this. Any thoughts?

EVENT

Conducting Mobility


Dates:
Sat Apr 19, 2008 00:00 - Sat Apr 19, 2008

image
Ryan Griffis and Claude Willey collide with a carload of cultural projects focusing on the problems of mobility and energy.

Works by: Brian Collier, Free Soil, Amy Balkin/Kim Stringfellow/Tim Halbur/Greenaction/Pond, kanarinka, Michael Mandiberg, Laurie Palmer, Platform, Josephine Starrs/Leon Cmielewski

Our world is continually shaped and reshaped by patterns of mobility. In the United States, motorization and single-use zoning are the principal components of a system that depends upon long distance travel and cheap energy. In the developing world, the wasteful patterns of the West are being repeated in places like China and India where increased automobile and fuel use are quickly becoming the norm. In all parts of the world, city governments struggle to keep pace with the energy and mobility needs of their expanding populations. Tourism, migration, military conflict, and environmental disasters all keep human beings on the move. Many choose their destinations, while others are forced towards them. Our 21st century world may ride the precarious line between the temporary and the permanent, and the ecosystems plundered by our unquenchable energy needs might have the final word. Art, and other forms of cultural reflection, can help to make accessible the structures and systems that propel us. It falls to all of us as global citizens to redirect our governing institutions and cultural perceptions - or we may find ourselves facing the end of the road.