ruth catlow
Since 2002
Works in London United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

PORTFOLIO (2)
BIO
Ruth Catlow was born in London 1968.

Ruth is an artist and co director of furtherfield.org. She works with a range of digital and network media as well as sculpture, writing, music and drawing, exhibiting in the streets and other public spaces, in galleries and on the Internet. Most of the works connect with specific (often unsuspecting) audiences in a specific condition i.e. on their way to work, doing the shopping, taking the kids to school etc. Or they intersect strangely with dominant and pre established genres in the mass media such as pornography on the Internet. In this way Ruth communicates her intimate and often raw perception of the big human subjects of love, sex, community, responsibility and freedom.

'A Diary of Objects in the Streets' is a website which documents the impromptu siting of a series of portable sculptures in public spaces with photographs and diary commentaries. The sculptures, made from materials and objects found in the streets, break with the conventions of interaction in London's public spaces.

Other recent projects explore personal expressions/representations of sexuality both domestic and mythic. They are Domestic Idols (selected by Sarah Cook for Lo-Fi), Mesmerized and Time to Smell the Flowers. Latest projects include a series of short films for the web such as 'Responsibility is yours' featured by Zbooks and 'One Among 400,000' a javascript driven collage of text, image and sound about the protest in London to stop the war against Iraq.

Ruth is co-director of furtherfield.org, formed in partnership with artist, Marc Garrett in 1996 as an alternative platform for the creation, promotion, and archiving of new work for public viewing and interaction. Furtherfield collaborates with independent visual artists, digital/net artists, writers, critical thinkers, musicians and noisemakers with a special focus on work developed and produced outside the recognised institutional support structures (colleges, galleries, corporate and public funding). Furtherfield.org explores new and imaginative strategies for communicating ideas and issues in a range of digital & terrestrial media contexts.

Furtherfield's activities focus on presenting works online and organising global, contributory projects, which exist simultaneously on the Internet, the streets and public venues.
Discussions (51) Opportunities (0) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

what bad taste?


The Chapman Brothers have been dropped as Britain's official artists in
Iraq over questions of bad taste. They raise some very pertinent issues
in this article.

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/media/story.jsp?storyB2111

ruth
http://www.furtherfield.org

DISCUSSION

Re: is google god?


>God is everywhere and God sees and knows everything. Throughout
>history, people connected to God without wires. Now, for many questions
>in the world, you ask Google, and increasingly, you can do it without
>wires, too.

Isn't one significant difference between Google and God, that God perceives
the significance and value of all the information in the known and unknown
universe, for all time.

I'd be fairly confident that no-one would claim the same for Google. Or are
we giving up on sentience now?

;-)
ruth

"t.whid" wrote:

> interesting take on tech from the well-known NYTime's foreign affairs
> dude:
>
> from the column:
>
> 'Says Alan Cohen, a V.P. of Airespace, a new Wi-Fi provider: "If I can
> operate Google, I can find anything. And with wireless, it means I will
> be able to find anything, anywhere, anytime. Which is why I say that
> Google, combined with Wi-Fi, is a little bit like God. God is wireless,
> God is everywhere and God sees and knows everything. Throughout
> history, people connected to God without wires. Now, for many questions
> in the world, you ask Google, and increasingly, you can do it without
> wires, too."'
>
> overblown hyperbole?
>
> http://nytimes.com/2003/06/29/opinion/29FRIE.html
> --
> <t.whid>
> www.mteww.com
> </t.whid>
>
> + ti esrever dna ti pilf nwod gniht ym tup
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php

DISCUSSION

Re: Defining Digital Art


would it be helpful to know why?

Ruth

> I like this:
>
> http://www.amoda.org/about/digitalart.php
>
> -Cf
>
> [christopher eli fahey]
> art: http://www.graphpaper.com
> sci: http://www.askrom.com
> biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com
>
> + ti esrever dna ti pilf nwod gniht ym tup
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php

DISCUSSION

Re: New Work -'Five Operas'- online.


<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en">
<html>
We couldn't make it to the performance tonight but I've just watched the
5 operas and then watched a couple of them again.
<br>Stunned and delighted.
<p>Kids being allowed to sing new songs that relate in unlikely but very
tangible ways to everyday life; songs without sentiment. Songs laughing
about the guy who gets drunk on cranberries or pondering perspectives on
telepathic communication with aliens; the girls who try to forget their
lives by shopping for shoes, while the tabloids talk down to everyone they
know, and no-one seems that bothered. A fox and a hen miraculously spend
an un-murderous evening together while George Washington, oblivious, cogitates
on being and nothingness. Lewis Lacook's exquisite love poem.
<p>I was reminded of a double CD&nbsp; I took out of Walthamstow library
a couple of years ago, of recordings of old&nbsp; folk tunes, songs and
and stories from across England and Scotland made by&nbsp; Ewan MacColl
and Peggy Seeger. These stories and songs were born in contained geographic
regions, into a slower pace of life, a slower rate of cultural consumption.
Stories of the particular, passing through archetype, dream, myth, for
the purposes of protest, human solidarity, survival, pleasure.
<p>Similarly to the 5 Operas, these recordings seemed to express in precise
and familiar detail, something about what it is like to be alive and responsive
in the world and what it means to share the experience. It's the attention
to the detail, right down to the context in which they are experienced..
About as far away as one could get from a definition, theory and yet precise.
<br>&nbsp;
<p>Ruth
<br>&nbsp;
<p>Michael Szpakowski wrote:
<blockquote TYPE=CITE><a href="http://www.somedancersandmusicians.com/5operas.html">http://www.somedancersandmusicians.com/5operas.html</a>
<br><a href="http://rhizome.org/info/29.php"></a>&nbsp;</blockquote>
</html>

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: attempting to share net.art with friends & family


I'm with you on this one Eduardo,

It's always been my ambition to communicate with my work to my family and my neighbours. The most common initial response I have when I talk about net art to them or interested strangers, is that they thought that art had to be painting, sculpture or maybe installations. Maybe this is because so many artists refer to the form that their art takes rather than the function, content or intention of the work. I've always regarded this as a bit of a cop out.

I'd have a go at communicating with the extra terrestrials if they showed an interest. After all there's so much to learn from the way work is received by any other sentient beings.

cheers
ruth

http://www.furtherfield.org

Eduardo Navas wrote:

> Ana Buigues wrote:
>
> > David and Eduardo,
> >
> > What would be the point of trying to reason with people (family
> > members, friends, pets, or extraterrestials) who are just not in the
> > same frequency as you?
> >
> > Best,
> >
> > Ana
> >
>
> The point is to communicate. Of course this depends on the type of relationship a person may have with her family; but in all honesty, I never bought the myth of disliking my parents simply because it gives me something to complain about during dinner party conversations while smoking cigarrettes. I must add that it is extremely disappointing to accept that such a social construct is so eagerly endorsed through TV sitcoms and movies, and is also fully reinforced around the art community. Communication is the reason why. If someone is curious, share. Though this may mean that a new type of complaint will have to be created for the next set of drinks... got cool?
> + ti esrever dna ti pilf nwod gniht ym tup
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php