ruth catlow
Since 2002
Works in London United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

PORTFOLIO (2)
BIO
Ruth Catlow was born in London 1968.

Ruth is an artist and co director of furtherfield.org. She works with a range of digital and network media as well as sculpture, writing, music and drawing, exhibiting in the streets and other public spaces, in galleries and on the Internet. Most of the works connect with specific (often unsuspecting) audiences in a specific condition i.e. on their way to work, doing the shopping, taking the kids to school etc. Or they intersect strangely with dominant and pre established genres in the mass media such as pornography on the Internet. In this way Ruth communicates her intimate and often raw perception of the big human subjects of love, sex, community, responsibility and freedom.

'A Diary of Objects in the Streets' is a website which documents the impromptu siting of a series of portable sculptures in public spaces with photographs and diary commentaries. The sculptures, made from materials and objects found in the streets, break with the conventions of interaction in London's public spaces.

Other recent projects explore personal expressions/representations of sexuality both domestic and mythic. They are Domestic Idols (selected by Sarah Cook for Lo-Fi), Mesmerized and Time to Smell the Flowers. Latest projects include a series of short films for the web such as 'Responsibility is yours' featured by Zbooks and 'One Among 400,000' a javascript driven collage of text, image and sound about the protest in London to stop the war against Iraq.

Ruth is co-director of furtherfield.org, formed in partnership with artist, Marc Garrett in 1996 as an alternative platform for the creation, promotion, and archiving of new work for public viewing and interaction. Furtherfield collaborates with independent visual artists, digital/net artists, writers, critical thinkers, musicians and noisemakers with a special focus on work developed and produced outside the recognised institutional support structures (colleges, galleries, corporate and public funding). Furtherfield.org explores new and imaginative strategies for communicating ideas and issues in a range of digital & terrestrial media contexts.

Furtherfield's activities focus on presenting works online and organising global, contributory projects, which exist simultaneously on the Internet, the streets and public venues.
Discussions (51) Opportunities (0) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: 'Visual jousting' & 'Remember Crimes'


>WARTIME< would be a good example

A digitial and network media collective project
for public performance and online, reflecting on
and reacting against WAR, past, present and
future.

This project goes fully live on Friday-
view the fantastic interface at http://offline.area3.net/wartime/

and the work of a fast growing number of contributors at
http://offline.area3.net/wartime/list_PART.php

ruth

> If you feel that strongly about it, or as strongly as others (which are few)
> that America has been wronged, then like Andrej, you too can create artwork
> as a form of creative argument against such declarations. May be someone can
> dedicate space for a visual argument for all concerned to place their views
> online, instead of just in text on the list. This is also a good opportunity
> for rhizome itself to deal with such issues of angst ridden statements that
> many are coming across on the list.

> So, if one of the rhizome gang wishes to designate web space specially for
> this matter, I am sure that they would would be looked upon affirmative
> reflection, by the list members and visiting online public.

> What does everyone else reckon?
>
> marc

DISCUSSION

"digital poetry" vs net art


> > lewis wrote:
> >> me, i just want a net art that is truly an art fitted to its medium...i
> > want a net art that literally requires the net work in order to manifest
> > itself...
>

ruth wrote:

> > I think this gives the institutions and the structures of the net work
> > far too much respect. Isn't this like saying that we only want art that
> > requires the cubey white walls of a gallery? Why are you so eager to
> > squash your squishy, expressive, human flesh sourced imaginations into
> > the predetermined and rigid labyrinths of mathematically determined
> > structures?

ivan wrote:

> My reading of lewis's statement is that he calls for network art that
> fundamentallly uses the network. i.e. not network art that could just as
> easily be displayed on a disconnected computer in a gallery. But pieces that
> use the network in some way to become themselves. And this should not
> necessarily mean the network of wires and routers and IP protocols but the
> network of information or the network of human activity. There are of course
> many works that do this already, so Im not saying much ... and, Im not
> claiming value for this approach. But I think to equate this with wanting
> art that fits in a white cube gallery is missing a point?

It's just that I thought I got a whiff of a kind of purist, muscular,
Greenbergian ethos (which I've never experienced in any of Lewis's work or
writing). I'm glad I did too, as it catalyzed the sharpening of a few of my own
blunt thoughts.
As for:-

> Maybe there's a
> May68 type slogan here: The Network Is Not A Gallery

Hurrah! :-D

cheers
Ruth

furtherfield.org

DISCUSSION

Re:"digital poetry" vs net art


One last thing. Wittgenstein said this-

'Even when all possible scientific questions have been answered, our problems
of life remain completely untouched'

////
OO
< ?
~

DISCUSSION

Re: Fwd: Re: RHIZOME_RAW: "digital poetry" vs net art


lewis lacook wrote:
>me, i just want a net art that is truly an art fitted to its medium...i
want a net art that literally requires the net work in order to manifest
itself...

I think this gives the institutions and the structures of the net work
far too much respect. Isn't this like saying that we only want art that
requires the cubey white walls of a gallery? Why are you so eager to
squash your squishy, expressive, human flesh sourced imaginations into
the predetermined and rigid labyrinths of mathematically determined
structures?

I know that my own attraction to 'net art that literally requires the
net work in order to manifest itself' is linked to a desire for the
safety of limits, control, submission paired up paradoxically with a
ridiculous programmed fear and respectful awe of the superior
intelligence/functionality ascribed to the 'coded' art work. (I do
regard this attraction as perverse-hehe)

Perhaps it is similar to a call for evidence of craft in art, a proof
that the artist is doing something that most people consider themselves
incapable of doing. Or a call for provable rigour. It is definitely a
step towards cyborgism which I don't have a problem with per se but
which I find it hard to get excited about.

Also don't think we can overlook the many different ways that artists
come to be net artists often starting with the 'decorative, and how it
applies to art on the web... making animations of words--at best, the
reactivity and interaction required of the user is touching rollover
buttons===which in flash, we know, takes almost no knowledge of code'

The animations and 'decorations' represent one of the roots/routes to
net art . Or do we insist that in order to enter a 'pantheon of net art'
the artist is prepared to dedicate a significant proportion of their
practice to learning and manipulating code. If this is what we are
saying, then if we want a burgeoning of excellent and relevant work we
need to set up apprenticeships for the learning of the craft of code,
otherwise we may find that we are excluding a whole gamut of artists
with insight and talent but no facility for code and therefore no way to
communicate. And what about how that time might otherwise be usefully
spent, researching and exploring other relevant human issues. Or perhaps
this is finally an admission that like in films we now need a team of
people with different areas of expertise to accomplish a net art work.

The net does not just provide a distinct medium but represents a
platform for a distinct but very diverse culture with a distinct means
of distribution. I think that 'net art that literally requires the net
work in order to manifest itself' maybe could include art that needs the
audience to receive knowledge of its existence through their emails in
order for it to resonate. Some very simple image and text web pages are
very successful in communicating poetics as true and rigorous and
relevant as any net work exclusive works. And the fact that I receive
them in my inbox influences how the pieces are received.

Thanks Lewis for starting this up

cheers

Ruth

furtherfield.org

>
> i agree. you should post this (below) back to the list (or i
> can
> redirect it if you didn't save it.) i'm happy to see more of
> this
> kinda discussion, rather than all the flaming that goes
> on... and i
> think others would be, too...
>
> best,
> ~mo
>
>
>
> >hi marisa...
> >
> >i agree that "digital poetry" is often a romantic term...
> >
> >what i'm looking for is perhaps this...i've been thinking
> lately
> >about the distinction between functional and decorative,
> and how it >applies to art on the web...a lot of the
> "digital poetry" crowd is
> >comprised of artists who make animations of words--at best,
> the
> >reactivity and interaction required of the user is touching
> rollover
> >buttons===which in flash, we know, takes almost no
> knowledge of code
> >at all...these works seem to me to be remaking cinema,
> which, as you
> >and i know, we already have...
> >
> >i guess it boils down to this: what's the difference
> between say, a
> >piece by mez and the recent gogolchat by jimpunk and
> christophe
> >bruno? because it's here i see the distinction most
> >clearly...gogolchat is highly functional:::it explores
> >user-interaction...it requires the network in order to
> manifest
> >itself (that being for me one of the true signs of a pure
> net
> >work...mez's connection to the network, at least in regards
> to her
> >multimedia works, is less tangible////the work does require
> the
> >! network, but in a passive way, that is, it requires email
> list-servs
> >for distribution, and takes much of its language from a
> kind of
> >pantomime of code itself...///it's more interactive than
> digital
> >cinema, but less so than a work like gogolchat (or chris
> fahey's
> >ada1852)----
> >
> >me, i just want a net art that is truly an art fitted to
> its
> >medium...i want a net art that literally requires the net
> work in
> >order to manifest itself...
> >
> >bliss
> >
> >l
> >
> >
> >
> > "Marisa S. Olson" wrote:
> >
> > >Are "digital poetry" and net art two distinct genres?
> And, perhaps
> > >more importantly, should they be?
> >
> >lewis,
> >
> >an interesting question, though i do wonder if "digital
> poetry" isn't
> >a romanticization of work (text-based or otherwise)
> constructed
> >and/or experienced in/with digital media.
> >
> >! of course you know that your question involves defining
> the
> >"products" of two practices that tend to defy
> >definition--particularly among these object-oriented lines.
> however,
> >i would most certainly say that there is a "poetics" of
> "net art," in
> >the sense that there are specific rhetorical,
> narratological,
> >structural conditions under which the work is made,
> represented,
> >distributed, accessed, interpreted, etc.. the means, modes,
> and
> >vehicles by which it signifies....
> >
> >marisa
> >
> >
> >_________________
> >Marisa S. Olson
> >Associate Director
> >SF Camerawork
> >415. 863. 1001
> >
> >
> >
> >Anningan (in progress)
> > http://www.le
> >wislacook.com/Anningan/AnningansDoor.html
> >
> >http://www.lewislacook.com/
> >
> >http://artists
> >.mp3s.com/artists/385/lewis_lacook.html
> >
> >meditation, net art, poeisis: blog
> >http://lewislacook.blogspot.com/
> >
> >
> >
> >Do you Yahoo!?
> >U2
> >on LAUNCH - Exclusive medley & videos from Greatest Hits CD
>
> _________________
> Marisa S. Olson
> Associate Director
> SF Camerawork
> 415. 863. 1001
>
>
>
>
> Anningan (in progress)
> http://www.lewislacook.com/Anningan/AnningansDoor.html
>
> http://www.lewislacook.com/
>
> http://artists.mp3s.com/artists/385/lewis_lacook.html
>
> meditation, net art, poeisis: blog http://lewislacook.blogspot.com/
>
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> Do you Yahoo!?
> U2 on LAUNCH - Exclusive medley & videos from Greatest Hits CD

DISCUSSION

a personal document of the protest to stop the war against Iraq


Hi everyone,

http://www.furtherfield.org/rcatlow/stop

This is a personal document of the protest that took place in London, UK
on September 28th 2002 to stop the war against Iraq. I am an artist
but on this day I was one among 400,000 (or there abouts) protesters.
It seems more relevant these days, for me as an artists, to jump in
with both feet, to be in the middle of a crowd of human beings when
so much of our experience of the world is so passive and mediated by
TV and film.

This document represents for me a cold bath in the historical and contempor=
ary
complexity of human fear, hatred and despair. We are all contaminated
by these emotions. Also an awakening to the possibilities of creating
alternative historical documents as a kind of anti-propaganda. Too complica=
ted
in their presentation of conflicting interests and disparate justification=
s
to stir up the emotions in preparation for misplaced activism. The web
browser is the perfect forum for this.

I would appreciate any feedback

o o
< ?
~
ruth catlow

furtherfield.org