Rob Myers
Since 2003
Works in United States of America

PORTFOLIO (5)
BIO
Rob Myers is an artist and hacker based in the UK.

I have been creating images of the contemporary social and cultural environment through programming, design software and visual remixing since the early 1990s. My work is influenced by popular culture and high art in equal measures. My interest in remixing and sampling has led to my involvement in the Free Culture movement. I have been involved in the public consultation regarding the Creative Commons 2.0 and CC-UK licenses. All my visual art is available under a Creative Commons license.

My interest in programming has led to my involvement with the Free Software movement. I developed the Macintosh version of the Gwydion Dylan programming language compiler. All my software is available under the GNU GPL.
Discussions (508) Opportunities (1) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Digital Karma generation (almost OT)


Om.

- Rob.

On 29 Nov 2003, at 07:44, Eryk Salvaggio wrote:

>
> I think Zen would say technology is.
>
> -e.
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Rob Myers" <robmyers@mac.com>
> To: <mailinglists@switchstance.com>
> Cc: <list@rhizome.org>
> Sent: Friday, November 28, 2003 5:45 AM
> Subject: Re: RHIZOME_RAW: Re: Digital Karma generation (almost OT)
>
>
>> On Friday, November 28, 2003, at 05:24AM,
>> <mailinglists@switchstance.com>
> wrote:
>>
>>> I can't imagine, though, that Buddhism would
>>> find technology to be anything other than
>>> irrelevant at best, a distraction at worst.
>>> Buddhism is an attempt to transcend the
>>> physical!
>>
>> Zen Buddhism is an attempt to reach an undifferentiated state. This
>> can be
> achieved ironically using money (see Japanese conumerism) or the
> internet
> (everything's a URL).
>>
>> I like the idea of prayer wheels on HDs.
>>
>> - Rob.
>> +
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>> +
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>>
>

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Vedic, Digital and Zetta Karma


On 28 Nov 2003, at 05:01, mailinglists@switchstance.com wrote:

> I think the big difference is that a cache-
> file is a hackable material object whereas
> universal Karma (according those who actually
> believe in it) is a spiritual quality of the
> universe.

Philosophy originated as a critique of religion. Hacking is a critique
of code, therefore philosophy. Now, Karma can be quantified, it's
causal, and we have at least some idea what causes it. It's (a) code.
Hacking is a critique of code, therefore philosophy. Now, Karma can be
quantified, it's causal, and we have at least some idea what causes it.
It's (a) code. Hacking is a critique of code, therefore philosophy.
Now, Karma can be quantified, it's causal, and we have at least some
idea what causes it. It's (a) code. Hacking is a critique of code,
therefore philosophy. Now, Karma can be quantified, it's causal, and we
have at least some idea what causes it. It's (a) code. Hacking is a
critique of code, therefore philosophy. Now, Karma can be quantified,
it's causal, and we have at least some idea what causes it. It's (a)
code. Hacking is a critique of code, therefore philosophy.

> I'm very uncomfortable with formulations that
> imagine man-made technology is somehow at the
> level of theological fundament. I'm an
> atheist, so I don't actually believe there IS
> a theological fundament anywhere; but
> imaginary mystical systems do NOT equate with
> nifty techno-toys.

Amen.

> I think the word Avatar itself, in reference
> to computers, is probably blasphemous.
> Luckily, I don't care particularly about
> blasphemy, or I might call it imperialist
> appropriation of voice and culture. I wonder
> if anyone here has heard serious Buddhists or
> devout Hindus react to our equation of their
> beliefs to a video game?

Souls have fraglimits.

- Rob.

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Digital Karma generation (almost OT)


On Friday, November 28, 2003, at 05:24AM, <mailinglists@switchstance.com> wrote:

>I can't imagine, though, that Buddhism would
>find technology to be anything other than
>irrelevant at best, a distraction at worst.
>Buddhism is an attempt to transcend the
>physical!

Zen Buddhism is an attempt to reach an undifferentiated state. This can be achieved ironically using money (see Japanese conumerism) or the internet (everything's a URL).

I like the idea of prayer wheels on HDs.

- Rob.

DISCUSSION

Re: Manifesto Of The Day


On Thursday, November 27, 2003, at 09:46AM, Ivan Pope <ivan@ivanpope.com> wrote:

>At the end of the eighties and the early nineties before the web came along
>there were artists working collaboratively via FTP and email.

As long a it's not Gopher I don't mind. :-)

>One of the main ways of working was with images that were passed around and
>modified. It was a bit laborious then, but it did work. No lovely instant
>web based gratification, but lots of offline coding and decoding.

I think automated site updating and open file formats will make this easier now. Imagine a Flash-based Wiki; download the file, modify it or add a link to your new file, upload. I do like the weblog idea (MPEG or midi files would work as well for sound and video, and coding projects could use Java or Flash). Is anyone interested?

>The main organiser of all this was OTIS (The Operative Term Is Stimulate).
>The Exquisite Corpse was an everyday reality, sort of. Even then it was
>clear that the networks were going to change everything. Still working on it
>though.
>Maybe you were there?

I wish. :-) My work first appeared online in the lab at Fuse '94 and I'm first mentioned in an art context online in a posting from SoDA on this list in 1997. I used to be on Rhizome around 1996, but I can't find any archives that far back on this site?

>A bit of a Google will give you the history of OTIS and likeminded things.

Thanks, I'd definitely like to find out about that.

Does anyone have any other reccomendations for precedents?

>I wrote because your email brought back memories of a brief and largely lost
>history of art on the web.

We need to know the history of art to build on it rather than aimlessly repeat it (like most yBA's).

- Rob.

DISCUSSION

Manifesto Of The Day


Start a weblog. Place a downloadable image on it in a common format
(SVG, PNG, Gimp, PhotoShop) placed under the Creative Commons
Atrribution-Sharealike license. Let people modify and re-upload the
image using the comments mechanism (censor uploads that don't preview,
offer help if people get this wrong). Collaborative art.

After a while upload a new image as a new topic and begin the process
again. Use elements from the previous work or make a call for new
images. Encourage an accompanying discourse (or at least discussion).
Take the work somewhere. Make shared objectives.

Art & Language's 1970s Indexes provide a good historical
counter-example to the whimsy of Exquisite Corpses and Mail Art for
collaborative artwork. The net can be studio and gallery
simultaneously. Work can be done this way. More, it should be done this
way. This is culturally urgent. The relations of production,
distribution and consumption as well as the creation and extraction of
value must be changed.