Harry Burke


Poetry as Practice: Melissa Broder's poems for Oneohtrix Point Never


 

Part of First Look: Poetry as Practice, copresented with the New Museum.

R Minus Seven (2015)
Melissa Broder
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R Minus Seven (2015) by Melissa Broder (@melissabroder) is a collection of ekphrastic poetry that was written in response to Oneohtrix Point Never's album R Plus Seven (Warp Records, 2013). Each of Broder's poems is presented in a layout designed by the poet on the online publishing platform NewHive. 

Melissa Broder is the author of three collections of poems, most recently SCARECRONE (Publishing Genius Press, 2014). Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in POETRY, Tin House, the Iowa Review, Fence, the Missouri Review, Denver Quarterly, and Guernica, among others. 


Artist Profile: Kari Altmann


 

Preview image from "XOMIA" (2015) which debuts March 27th at Ellis King

The latest in a series of interviews with artists who have developed a significant body of work engaged (in its process, or in the issues it raises) with technology. See the full list of Artist Profiles here.

Your work functions on two different, related, levels. The first is the macro, or the meta—the way that images or systems are linked together, a concern that is present throughout your practice. The second is the micro—for example, tracing visual similarities between survival tools and credit card designs or reptile claws and the Three Mobile logo in Soft Mobility (2014-ongoing). Your practice is as much about workflows as individual works, which allows you and your viewer to trace connections between these macro and micro levels. What prompted you to start thinking in this way?

I've been asked this a lot lately, I've been trying to figure out some moment. I can only nail down a rough timeline that's still running. Too much content? Which led to too many tagging tools and algorithms? Too many aggregational platforms? Too much curation? Too many blogs? Too many new projects? Too much art direction? Tropes and genres just became super easy to notice, reveal, nudge, merge, produce, and reproduce. Also to deconstruct. Conceptual and cultural tropes as much as the nuts and bolts stuff. Art became about accounts and feeds just like music did. Images became meta images. Objects became meta images. Everything could be linked. Everything was part of a stream, then a mass. Everything became fractalized. Tags became crucially important. You could make other people's art, you could predict what everyone was going to post next, faster than they could post it. Your ideas and personalities became brands instantly. You started viewing everything in situ with similar and related content around it, which in art always included other work that was copying it or at least was uncomfortably similar. It also included products, artifacts, architecture, and selfies. The line between the research, the idea, the art product and the resulting trend and community blurred. One image wasn't enough. The timeline from thought to post diminished. All content sources became equalized. Resources were scarce. Memes dominated. People had their first feelings of AI. It's a story for another time.


Poetry as Practice: Ye Mimi's filmic postcards of street life in NYC, Chicago, and Taiwan


The poetry film Was Being Moved? (2011) takes the form of a series of postcards to a "Mr. Parade," interspersed with vignettes of public rituals and street life in Chicago, New York City, and Taiwan. It features music composed and played by Taiwanese musician Yujun Wang.

Ye Mimi is a Taiwanese poet and filmmaker. Having earned an MFA in creative writing at Dong Hwa University and an MFA in film at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, she is the author of two volumes of poetry and has exhibited several of her poetry films internationally. Through collaging her words and images, she improvises a new landscape, trying to erase the border between poetry and image making. A bilingual chapbook of her poems was recently published by Anomalous Press under the title His Days Go by the Way Her Years (2013).


Poetry as Practice: Tan Lin


 

Part of First Look: Poetry as Practice, copresented with the New Museum.

Mastering the Art of French Cooking and Systems Theory (2015)
Tan Lin, 2015
Programming by Charles Broskoski

This work uses a script to pit two books—which address subjects known for their difficulty to master—against one another at hundreds of words per minute.

Tan Lin is the author of Lotion Bullwhip Giraffe (2000), BlipSoak01 (2003), Ambience is a Novel with a Logo (2007), Heath (Plagiarism/Outsource) (2009), and 7 Controlled Vocabularies and Obituary 2004. The Joy of Cooking (2010). His work has appeared in numerous journals including Conjunctions, Artforum, Cabinet, New York Times Book Review, Art in America, and Purple, and his video, theatrical, and LCD work has been exhibited widely. He currently teaches creative writing at New Jersey City University.


First Look: Poetry as Practice


In this online exhibition, six poets approach internet language as a bodily, social, and material process. 

New poetry works will be published every Monday through April 6, 2015. Co-presented by Rhizome and the New Museum as part of the First Look exhibition series; curated by Harry Burke.



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DISCUSSION

Parapolitics


Hey Stephan. Thanks for your comment! I appreciate your evoking the recent history/work of Guyton/Price/Joselit etc. Joselit's writing I've been finding particularly interesting at the moment, and I feel more emphasis should be made on this emergent lineage within art history.

I think, however, that my use of the word and idea of refusal was intended to be more specific than it perhaps comes across. Generally, I don't believe we can reduce issues such as these to the binary of inside and outside, of acceptance or refusal, as clearly it is impossible not to participate in many of these networks, or even within capitalism itself, as an economic system and ideology. The interest for me then comes in what way we can shape or alter these systems from the inside. Identifying your complicity within these structures implies a certain amount of responsibility, I feel, in the recognition that they are shaped and continually reshaped by their actors. Opting out is definitely a historical fantasy in this context; but it is also one that can be potentially devastating, as it allows existing relations to persist. So let's keep going, but, yes, differently (and maybe also collectivising on the way) :).

This having been said, I feel that when it comes to internships and other forms of complicity with free labour then it can be more simple. If all interns refused to work for free, then the whole institute of interning would be fucked. Huw Lemmey has talked about the idea of an intern strike, and imagine what a huge political force this body of disaffected workers could be if mobilised. Also this (underappreciated I feel) tweet from David Rudnick: https://twitter.com/David_Rudnick/status/295585165206495232.

DISCUSSION

Bindigirl


it was launched in 1999, right?

DISCUSSION

London Calling


cmd was set up with exactly this intention, although it certainly hasn't yet fulfilled it - hopefully it will. Whilst it does seem funny to be discussing issues of locality surrounding internet-related practice, I think debate can be far more constructive in a seminar style enviroment (ie IRL), which obviously geographic proximity aids. Thus the differing 'characters' from city to city. Hence also the value of Ben's 'social engineering', to cite only one example and repay the compliment. With this in mind I'd certainly support a Cooper Union style reading group (let's make it happen). The discussion in this comment thread is rich, yet could only benefit from the more focused environment.