Peter Sciscioli
Since 2004
Works in New York, New York United States of America

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EVENT

Nora Ligorano/Marshall Reese, Larry Litt @ The Kitchen


Dates:
Fri Aug 27, 2004 00:00 - Fri Aug 20, 2004

Two videos reflecting on public trust betrayal and
necessary acts of citizenship…
August 27-September 3

·Nora Ligorano and Marshall Reese: Lineup: The Unofficial Portraits
·Larry Litt: Before You Don’t Vote… Advice to the Angry, Apathetic and Alienated

From August 27 through September 3, 2004, The Kitchen Art Gallery presents two video screenings reflecting on media, language and power. Offered in conjunction with the Imagine Festival, this program aims to raise consciousness on simple acts of citizenship (like voting) as important and necessary engagements in political action. Voter registration materials will be available in the space. The Kitchen Art Gallery is open from 12-6pm everyday, except August 29. Admission is free. A reception will be held during the opening on Friday, August 27 from 5-7pm.

With the slide show, Lineup: The Unofficial Portraits, New York-based artists Nora Ligorano and Marshall Reese examine public trust and its too frequent abuse and betrayal by political figures. Key members of President Bush’s cabinet are displayed in prisoners’ mug shot format-a form of portraiture which has arguably become prevalent in a country with the highest world population of incarcerated. The subjects are identified with recent dates of national policy announcements in print and electronic media, alluding to them as “criminals who have betrayed public trust.” A postcard edition of the work will be available for distribution.

Before You Don’t Vote…-a documentary video by media artist/journalist Larry Litt-features fast-paced, cross-cut interviews with over fifty politically involved American writers, artists and activists commenting on democracy’s past, present and future. This critical, witty 24-minute work offers a wide range of point of views, intending to stimulate conversation about social and political issues. Before You Don’t Vote… Advice to the Angry, Apathetic and Alienated was commissioned by the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art. Its screening at Imagine Festival will be its first NY non-academic showing in public. Educational-discussion guidelines will be available.

This event is presented as part of the Imagine Festival of Arts, Issues & Ideas, a citywide cultural festival designed to inspire, instigate and support civic engagement. From August 28-September 2 the Imagine Festival will present over 100 cultural events in 6 days including concerts, performances, forums, town meetings, exhibits, screenings, and other issue-based artworks. www.imagine04.org

Artists:
Nora Ligorano and Marshall Reese: have a longtime practice of art and political commentary, including their Pure Products of America series, video-portrait installations, and a new-site specific piece Free Speech Zone currently on view at the Brooklyn Public library, Grand Army Plaza.

Larry Litt’s first Blame Show video, Dissent = Freedom, was commissioned by White Box in 2001. His second video, Polite, Politic and Political, was commissioned by the Queens Museum of Art in 2002. Before You Don't Vote... is in the collections of over 50 academic and arts institutions where it will be screened prior to Election Day.


EVENT

Public Talks as part of The Kitchen's Sidney Kahn Summer Institute


Dates:
Tue Jun 22, 2004 00:00 - Mon May 31, 2004

June 22 (Tue): VITO ACCONCI

WHERE: THE KITCHEN, 512 West 19th Street, NYC
(Between 10th & 11th Avenues)

TIME: All talks are at 7pm

PRICE: $12 each/$25 for all three

As part of the annual Sidney Kahn Summer Institute (June 7-25), The Kitchen presents three public talks in which artists at the forefront of site-specific installation and performance speak about their work.

On June 22 (Tuesday), acclaimed multimedia artist Vito Acconci will address his move from performance to installation to architecture in a talk entitled Performing Architecture. After working with performance art and video in the late 60's and early 70's, Acconci crossed over into architecture and landscape design, and in 1988 started the Acconci Studio, an architecture and design office. The Acconci Studio has recently completed an artificial island in Graz, an adjustable gallery in New York, and a clothing store in Tokyo, and is currently working on a skateboard park in San Juan and a spiraling-ramped house in Calamata.

For more information visit www.thekitchen.org or call 212.255.5793 x11


EVENT

Public Talks as part of The Kitchen's Sidney Kahn Summer Institute


Dates:
Wed Jun 16, 2004 00:00 - Mon May 31, 2004

As part of the annual Sidney Kahn Summer Institute (June 7-25), The Kitchen presents three public talks in which artists at the forefront of site-specific installation and performance speak about their work.

June 16 (Wed): Performances in Public Space: Four Distinct Aesthetics and Strategies
MARTHA BOWERS, STEPHAN KOPLOWITZ, TAMAR ROGOFF,
MARY ELLEN STROM (panelists), with ELISE BERNHARDT (moderator)

WHERE: THE KITCHEN, 512 West 19th Street, NYC
(Between 10th & 11th Avenues)

TIME: All talks are at 7pm

PRICE: $12 each/$25 for all three

On June 16 (Wednesday), Elise Bernhardt, Executive Director of The Kitchen, invites four artists whose site-specific performances have had a profound impact on their surrounding communities to show filmed excerpts of their work and discuss their creative process. The panel, which is entitled Performances in Public Space: Four Distinct Aesthetics and Strategies, includes Martha Bowers, whose community-based projects in Red Hook have aided in the urban renewal of that neighborhood; Stephan Koplowitz, whose large scale works with dancers have transformed the windows of Grand Central Terminal and the grand steps of New York buildings; Tamar Rogoff, whose Ivye Project involved a village in Belarus that was forever changed by the Holocaust; and Mary Ellen Strom, whose collaborative projects have included video projections on everything from grain silos to the mountains of Montana.

For more information visit www.thekitchen.org or call 212.255.5793 x11


EVENT

Public Talks as part of The Kitchenas Sidney Kahn Summer Institute


June 9 (Wed): CHRISTO and JEANNE-CLAUDE

WHERE: THE KITCHEN, 512 West 19th Street, NYC
(Between 10th & 11th Avenues)

TIME: 7pm

PRICE: $12 each/$25 for all three

As part of the annual Sidney Kahn Summer Institute (June 7-25), The Kitchen presents three public talks in which artists at the forefront of site-specific installation and performance speak about their work.

On June 9 (Wednesday), Christo and Jeanne-Claude, internationally known for their large-scale works of art, will discuss the details of their works-in-progress: The Gates, Project for Central Park, New York City, and Over the River, Project for the Arkansas River, State of Colorado. For The Gates, (slated to be completed in Central Park in February, 2005), 7500 free hanging saffron colored fabric panels, suspended from the horizontal top part of 7500 gates, will follow the edges of the walkways and will run perpendicular to the selected 23 miles of footpaths in the park. For Over the River, fabric panels suspended clear of and high above the water level of the Arkansas River in Colorado will follow the configuration and width of its changing course.

The other talks are scheduled for June 16 (Wed) and June 22 (Tue).

For more information, visit www.thekitchen.com or call 212.255.5793 x11.


EVENT

Dance In Progress @ The Kitchen


Dates:
Thu May 27, 2004 00:00 - Fri May 21, 2004

The Kitchen’s longest-running program features four emerging choreographers/collaborators showcasing innovation in dance. Each evening is the culmination of a two-month long laboratory of creating work and incorporating feedback. This season’s program offers work by Leigh Garrett/Katie Workum, Jon Kinzel, Heather Kravas, and Johanna S. Meyer. Performances are on Thursday & Friday, May 27 & 28 at 8pm at The Kitchen (512 West 19th Street, New York City). Tickets are $12.

In their newest dance-theater collaboration, Leigh Garrett and Katie Workum invite the audience into their whodunit dance-play set in an Eastern European hotel lobby, circa 1947. With this first installment of HOTEL, Garrett and Workum draw from radio plays, Hitchcock, pure and stylized movement, and the structure of Choose-Your-Own-Adventure books to create a world of fascinating characters in a serio-comic environment.

Return My Jeep marks John Kinzel’s first performance in New York after a two-year absence. This new solo addresses concerns for the body, theater and athleticism, and straddles the line between contemporary dance and conceptual art. Kinzel is interested in the notion of the audience as a “social construct,” while presenting theatrical work that incorporates ideas of authority, environment, fashion and improvisation.

In Heather Kravas’ the gnome is bad. repetition and extended timing obliterate a sense of narrative. Defying perceived notions of virtuosity, the piece uses emotionally charged and physically exhausting movement to attempt transformation, leaving meaning open to interpretation. The elements of power-- submission, domination, control and chaos-- will be explored.

I cancan 2 is the second work by Johanna S. Meyer to explore the origins of cancan, stripping, and carnival dancing, and their influences on 19th and 20th century attitudes toward women and independence. Drawing from sources such as Jean Renoir’s film, French Cancan, and Susan Meiselas’ photo series, Carnival Strippers, Meyer and Beth Kurkjian perform with edgy humor, restrained chaos, and precise, erotic glamour.

Biographies:
Leigh Garrett and Katie Workum began creating dance theater together five years ago. Since then, their work has been produced at Joyce SoHo, The Flea Theater, Joe’s Pub, Symphony Space, WAX, CBGB’s, PSNBC at HERE, Spoke the Hub and the Lisa Leann and Terry Dean Put on a Dance Show at Galapagos Art and Performance Space. Their full length The Miami Project, premiered at WAX in February 2002 and later ran for four weeks at GAle GAtes et al in June of that year. Katie and Leigh have also appeared in work by Stacy Dawson, David Neumann, Sarah East Johnson, Ken Nintzel, DD Dorvillier, Fischerspooner, and GAle GAtes et al. Katie curates and performs in DANCEOFF!, a cabaret at Joe’s Pub, and Leigh creates and presents The Garrett & Phillips Show, a live sit-com seen at various venues throughout the city. They are recipients of the 2001 and 2002 Choreographer’s Fellowship at Summer Stages Dance Festival in Concord MA. In 2001 they won a NFAA Astral Grant to produce Smart Set.

Jon Kinzel's commissions include Moo (Danspace Project at St. Mark’s Church) with designs by Cynthia Rowley; a one-man show, Who Has a Bill? (Menageria de Verre, Paris); and Quality of Life (NYONY-The Puffin Foundation). John’s most recent creation, Wastewater Management was presented at The Underground Theater in Provincetown. He was a Movement Research artist in residence in 1998-1999, and has worked with John Kelly and Matthew Barney.

Heather Kravas grew up in Pullman, WA where she studied a variety of dance and theatre forms. In 1994, she began creating dances in Seattle with Karn Junkinsmith and Jack Magai before moving to NYC in 1997. Kravas currently improvises with cellist Okkyung Lee as the nono twins, and has performed with human future dance corps and Jennifer Allen. Her work has been presented by DTW, Movement Research @ Judson Church, Hothouse @ P.S. 122, The Yard and subtonic, among others. She has been funded by the Bossak Heilbron Charitable Foundation and the Seattle Arts Commission. At present Kravas is working on a series of “gnomadic” dances in collaboration with Canadian artist, Tonja Livingstone.

Johanna S. Meyer has been choreographing and performing in New York since 1991. She has created two evening-length works and ten short pieces, many in collaboration with long-time choreographic partner Alexandra Hartmann. The first version of I cancan premiered at Galapagos in September 2003. Johanna’s work has also been presented at such venues as P.S. 122, Dixon Place, Joyce SoHo, and through Movement Research at Judson Church. Her experience choreographing for theater includes work with Ontological Directors in Residence DJ Mendel, Robert Cucuzza, Juliana Francis and Ken Nintzel, and with Amanda Charlton in the Williamstown Theater Festival production of Chuck Mee’s Big Love. As a performer she has appeared in the work of OBIE-winner Richard Maxwell, Nami Yamimoto, Karen Sherman and Tanya Gagne, Andrea Kleine, and Nina Martin. She is a graduate of NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts.