Paul St George
Since the beginning
Works in London United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

PORTFOLIO (2)
BIO
Three interweaving themes emerge from Paul St George's projects. One is a study of the history of visual culture (Classical Roman and late Victorian). Both eras are well known for their rich successes, but also hide a number of overlooked or incomplete projects. Paul St George has uncovered and is completing a number of these, including the Telectroscope http://www.telectroscope.net and Travelling curves http://www.travellingcurves.com/curves/.
Another persistent theme is the use of photography and chronophotography to picture time. This is developed in the Chronocyclography, Trackorama, Supermoment and Chronopan projects, but also in curating the Sequences exhibition and in editing the imagetime series of books http://www.wallflowerpress.co.uk/category/imagetime.
The third theme is the exploration of ambiguity. This has produced the highly collectable Minumental sculptures, Carpet Castle and the ultimate, two for the price of one, Rabbitduck.
These projects are available at http://www.paulstgeorge.com/
Discussions (8) Opportunities (0) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

St George's Telectroscope


As you probably know by now, I am building a tunnel from New York to London and then installing a Telectroscope at each end. The Telectroscope will enable people to see through the tunnel so people in New York and London will be able to see each other. There are many ways of interpreting this project and I am inviting you to take part by contributing to the blog.

Please join in at http://blog.telectroscope.org/

Paul St George

DISCUSSION

Sequences touring exhibition


Sequences touring exhibition

What?
Sequences is a national touring exhibition
curated by Paul St George, produced by
peterborough digital arts and supported by
funding from Arts Council England.

Where and when?
The tour opens at peterborough digital arts on
Friday 26 November 2004 (18:30 - 21:30).
For directions, please see http://www.pdarts.org.uk/

Why?
The exhibition shows contemporary work that uses
sequences of images to explore ideas of time,
movement and duration. Marey and other
chronophotographers first explored these ideas at
the turn of the nineteenth century. 2004 marks
the centenary of Marey's death. In those 100
years chronophotography has been in the shadow of
cinema, but now it is emerging once again in post
cinema practices, digital art, kinetic sculpture
and new experimental photography. Artists have
found that sequences of images offer new
opportunities for exploring the timeless issues
such as subjectivity, the subject's experience of
time and space and the aesthetics that operate at
the intersection of time and space.
The exhibition aims to answer two questions. Can
we gain insights into the use of sequential
images in contemporary art by re-examining
chronophotography and pre-cinema? Do we gain a
better understanding of chronophotography and
pre-cinema by re-assessing their histories from a
current perspective?

Who?
Sequences includes work by: Andrea Polli, Andrew
Davidhazy, Babel, Bjorn Schulke, Darren Almond,
David Crawford, Martin Newth, Patrick Tarrant,
Paul St George, Pia Jonsson, Rufus Butler Seder,
Simon Lewandowski, Studiometis, Tess Glanville
and Tim Macmillan.

--
For more information, http://www.pdarts.org.uk/sequences/

DISCUSSION

Sequences touring exhibition


Sequences touring exhibition

What?
Sequences is a national touring exhibition
curated by Paul St George, produced by
peterborough digital arts and supported by
funding from Arts Council England.

Where and when?
The tour opens at peterborough digital arts on
Friday 26 November 2004 (18:30 - 21:30).
For directions, please see http://www.pdarts.org.uk/

Why?
The exhibition shows contemporary work that uses
sequences of images to explore ideas of time,
movement and duration. Marey and other
chronophotographers first explored these ideas at
the turn of the nineteenth century. 2004 marks
the centenary of Marey's death. In those 100
years chronophotography has been in the shadow of
cinema, but now it is emerging once again in post
cinema practices, digital art, kinetic sculpture
and new experimental photography. Artists have
found that sequences of images offer new
opportunities for exploring the timeless issues
such as subjectivity, the subject's experience of
time and space and the aesthetics that operate at
the intersection of time and space.
The exhibition aims to answer two questions. Can
we gain insights into the use of sequential
images in contemporary art by re-examining
chronophotography and pre-cinema? Do we gain a
better understanding of chronophotography and
pre-cinema by re-assessing their histories from a
current perspective?

Who?
Sequences includes work by: Andrea Polli, Andrew
Davidhazy, Babel, Bjorn Schulke, Darren Almond,
David Crawford, Martin Newth, Patrick Tarrant,
Paul St George, Pia Jonsson, Rufus Butler Seder,
Simon Lewandowski, Studiometis, Tess Glanville
and Tim Macmillan.

--
For more information, http://www.pdarts.org.uk/sequences/

DISCUSSION

Sequences


Call for work.

Paul St George is curating an exhibition called Sequences.

The exhibition will aim to answer two questions. Can we gain insights
into the use of sequential images in contemporary digital art by
re-examining chronophotography and pre-cinema? Do we gain a better
understanding of chronophotography and pre-cinema by re-assessing
their histories from a current perspective?

The exhibition will show work that uses sequences of images to
explore ideas of time, movement, duration and space.

Academics and experts from the worlds of multimedia and art are
invited to propose relevant work. If the work is accepted the
proposer will be invited to write an essay about the work and its
relationship with chronophotography or pre-cinema. This collection of
essays will be published in a book at the time of the exhibition.

Paul St George is developing 'Sequences' with Peterborough Digital
Arts in the UK. The first showing of 'Sequences' will be at
Peterborough from 27 November 2004 to 23 January 2005. We then plan
to tour to a number of national and international art galleries.

Are you interested in sequential images? Are you interested in the
relationships between contemporary art and chronophotography or
pre-cinema? If you would like to contribute to 'Sequences' in any
way please write to: Paul St George <email@sequences.org.uk>

--
You are probably familiar with pre-cinema (magic lanterns, zeotropes,
phenakistiscopes, thaumatropes, praxinoscopes and so on) but you
might want to see some examples of chronophotography at
http://www.sequences.org.uk/

DISCUSSION

Call for work


Paul St George is curating an exhibition called Sequences.

The exhibition will aim to answer two questions. Can we gain insights
into the use of sequential images in contemporary digital art by
re-examining chronophotography and pre-cinema? Do we gain a better
understanding of chronophotography and pre-cinema by re-assessing
their histories from a current perspective?

The exhibition will show work that uses sequences of images to
explore ideas of time, movement, duration and space.

Academics and experts from the worlds of multimedia and art are
invited to propose relevant work. If the work is accepted the
proposer will be invited to write an essay about the work and its
relationship with chronophotography or pre-cinema. This collection of
essays will be published in a book at the time of the exhibition.

Paul St George is developing 'Sequences' with Peterborough Digital
Arts. The first showing of 'Sequences' will be at Peterborough from
27 November 2004 to 23 January 2005. We then plan to tour to a number
of national and international art galleries.

Are you interested in sequential images? Are you interested in the
relationships between contemporary art and chronophotography or
pre-cinema? If you would like to contribute to 'Sequences' in any
way please write to: Paul St George <email@sequences.org.uk>

--
You are probably familiar with pre-cinema (magic lanterns, zeotropes,
phenakistiscopes, thaumatropes, praxinoscopes and so on) but you
might want to see some examples of chronophotography at
http://www.sequences.org.uk/