Patrick May
Since 2002
Works in NY, New York United States of America

BIO
Patrick May is a programmer and painter. He founded the artist collective Open Ground and was the Director of Technology at Rhizome.org from 2006-2008.

May received a BS in Studio Art from New York University in 1999. His work has been exhibited in New York, Miami, and Berlin, including Maiden Brooklyn, ZONE: Chelsea Center for the Arts, and the Galerie Scherer 8. He currently works in Brooklyn, NY creating intimate portraits of his friends and family.

Artists Wanted Competition


Artists Wanted – an open call for submissions.

The current Art World is rife with uninspired work. Too often artists are elevated based on who they know instead of the quality of their work. Our goal is to up-end that process.

Artists Wanted is a new and ongoing program designed to promote the great undiscovered artists of our time. Those selected will receive $2007 cash, an inclusion in our annual publication, and a solo show at the 3rd Ward gallery in Brooklyn. Runners-up will be listed and linked on the website and have the possibility of being featured in our publication. Submission deadline: Sept. 21st. Submission fee: $25 for 3 images. No previous exposure necessary. We want the best, most talented, undiscovered artists. We want you.

All information about submission available through www.artistswanted.org.

READ ON »



Discussions (68) Opportunities (1) Events (1) Jobs (3)
DISCUSSION

Re: Rhizome is under attack


Lee,

Thanks for writing. I've taken the following actions:

+ banned messages from "mi_ga@o-o.lt" from RAW
+ XXXXX redacted XXXXX

I haven't posted these details publicly, in order to make it more
difficult for mi_ga to respond to these measures.

Cheers,

Patrick

--
Patrick May
Director of Technology
Rhizome.org
phone: (212) 219-1288 x202
AIM: cyclochew
+ + +

On Apr 9, 2006, at 1:30 PM, Lee Wells wrote:

> Hi Rhizome Staff:
>
> Although only irritating. This Mailia stuff is getting out of control.
> Can you guys do something to protect us from this spam art or
> atleast let us
> know what is being done to try to stop him or her from continuing this
> action.
>
> Thanks for the help in advance.
>
> Cheers,
> Lee
> --
> Lee Wells
> Brooklyn, NY 11222
>
> http://www.leewells.org
> http://www.perpetualartmachine.com
> 917 723 2524

DISCUSSION

Re: Mailia


Hello all,

I also need to note that we have pending issues with the mailing list
subscribe / unsubscribe forms. As I said earlier, I have put
measures into place to block the flood of mailia emails.

If you still wish to leave the list and have trouble doing so, please
contact me at:

webmaster@rhizome.org

Cheers,

Patrick

--
Patrick May
Director of Technology
Rhizome.org
phone: (212) 219-1288 x202
AIM: cyclochew
+ + +

On Apr 9, 2006, at 1:01 PM, Patrick May wrote:

> Hello,
>
> As mailia appears to be caught in a mail loop, endlessly spamming
> the list, I have put the "mi_ga@o-o.lt" address on hold.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Patrick
>
> --
> Patrick May
> Director of Technology
> Rhizome.org
> phone: (212) 219-1288 x202
> AIM: cyclochew
> + + +
>
>
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/
> subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/
> 29.php

DISCUSSION

Mailia


Hello,

As mailia appears to be caught in a mail loop, endlessly spamming the
list, I have put the "mi_ga@o-o.lt" address on hold.

Cheers,

Patrick

--
Patrick May
Director of Technology
Rhizome.org
phone: (212) 219-1288 x202
AIM: cyclochew
+ + +

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Preserving Work That Falls Outside the Norm - NYTIMES


Hello,

Just to clarify, Rhizome is not interested in censoring art by any
means. But this was a particular case as the artist was using
"list@rhizome.org" as their alias. This compeled us to respond to
complaints, of which we'd received many.

I think it would be best for people to filter out mailia
individually. Its a misuse of our resources to spend time answering
for this project in light of our recent server difficulties.

Personally I think this project is funny, but it has distracted from
the ongoing rhizome.org recovery process.

Cheers,

Patrick

--
Patrick May
Director of Technology
Rhizome.org
phone: (212) 219-1288 x202
AIM: cyclochew
+ + +

On Apr 4, 2006, at 5:05 PM, marc wrote:

> I'm not sure if we should be too hasty in stopping a net art work
> in its tracks - what about giving the artist a voice in this,
> privately or openly - and negotiating something...
>
> something decent could come out of this - if he's not a real
> spammer then their is a connected context - although I have been
> wrong before...
>
> marc
>
>> I would agree, I think the artist (who prefers to remain anonymous)
>> shoulod take ownership of the mailings
>> Eric
>>
>> Mindaugas Gapsevicius (mi_ga) was born in 1974 in Lithuania, he
>> lives and works in Lubeck, Germany and Vilnius, Lithuania.
>> Having studied visual arts in Academy of Arts in Vilnius and in
>> Muthesius-Hochschule in Kiel, he works as a network administrator
>> at ISNM, International School of New Media, in Lubeck. In addition
>> he is working as a guest lecturer at University of Arts in Berlin.
>> Mindaugas Gapsevicius is one of the initiators of o-o institutio
>> media which was established in 1998 and a co-author of net.art
>> project asco-o. As an artist, he uses to be more often anonymous
>> as real. He likes to play. Acording to him, the play is the core
>> of his works, the reaction to the surroundings and the action of
>> his vision.
>> +
>> -> post: list@rhizome.org
>> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
>> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/
>> subscribe.rhiz
>> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
>> +
>> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
>> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/
>> 29.php
>>
>>
>>
>
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/
> subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/
> 29.php

DISCUSSION

Re: Preserving Work That Falls Outside the Norm - NYTIMES


Hello,

So, Mailia is apparently an art project written by this Rhizome user:

mi_ga@o-o.lt

There's enough of a history of spam / art to complicate matters.
There are plenty unrequested, confusing, and obscure emails which are
sent to RAW. That's part of the beauty of RAW.

What bothers me is the forgery of the "list@rhizome.org" email
address. I think this classic virus / spam technique is evasive and
ultimately abusive as it takes up our time to investigate the problem.

I'd rather that mi_ga take responsibility for his / her progeny and
use a more appropriate "From Address". Although it may have been
mi_ga's intention for us at Rhizome to answer questions about the
artwork, our recent server issues have put a strain on our time.

My question is whether the readers of RAW think that it is
appropriate for me to proceed with these actions:

* report mi_ga and mi_ga's ISP as a spammer
* remove mi_ga from the Rhizome RAW list.

Cheers,

Patrick

--
Patrick May
Director of Technology
Rhizome.org
phone: (212) 219-1288 x202
AIM: cyclochew
+ + +

On Apr 3, 2006, at 11:47 AM, Ryan Griffis wrote:

> Apparently, Mailia is some software that someone on the list is
> running, so it's auto-replying to everyone's email...
> see:
> http://www.rhizome.org/thread.rhiz?thread 772&page=1
> ryan
>
> On Apr 3, 2006, at 11:09 PM, Lauren Cornell wrote:
>
>>
>> No, you're not. I started receiving these messages last week, and
>> thought
>> I was the only one. With the server issues we encountered, looking
>> into got
>> laid to the wayside. We will do so asap, and let you know.. -- L
>>
>>
>> On 4/2/06 11:49 AM, "Lee Wells" <lee@leewells.org> wrote:
>>
>>> I'm glad I'm not alone.
>>>
>>> On 4/2/06 12:26 PM, "marc" <marc.garrett@furtherfield.org> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I would'nt mind knowing also...
>>>>
>>>> marc
>>>>
>>>>> Can someone explain to me what mailia is?
>>>>>
>>>>> On 4/2/06 12:50 PM, "rhizome" <list@rhizome.org> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> mailia
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Lee Wells <lee@leewells.org> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Nice quote Lauren.
>>>>>>> Cheers.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> March 29, 2006
>>>>>>> Conservation
>>>>>>> Preserving Work That Falls Outside the Norm
>>>>>>> By TERRY SCHWADRON
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Correction Appended
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> FOR centuries, museums, libraries and collectors have been
>>>>>>> forced to worry
>>>>>>> about how to keep artifacts and documents from falling into
>>>>>>> pieces.
>>>>>>> Despite
>>>>>>> the inevitable decay of the materials involved, curators and
>>>>>>> conservators
>>>>>>> have protected mummies, paintings and other objects.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Now these curators and conservators find themselves in the
>>>>>>> digital era,
>>>>>>> with
>>>>>>> artists presenting work that challenges not only the
>>>>>>> audience, but also
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> traditions of preservation. The essential question is, How
>>>>>>> does a museum
>>>>>>> safeguard work that was built as an interactive experience
>>>>>>> and that may be
>>>>>>> based on computer code that will almost certainly disappear
>>>>>>> in less than
>>>>>>> two
>>>>>>> years?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "It's certainly been a problem since the first time we
>>>>>>> decided to keep
>>>>>>> something," said Richard Rinehart, director of digital media
>>>>>>> at the
>>>>>>> Berkeley
>>>>>>> Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive of the University of
>>>>>>> California.
>>>>>>> "That's
>>>>>>> what museums do: they are society's memory banks. Digital art
>>>>>>> is different
>>>>>>> because it essentially can disappear."
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "I like to joke that digital art can last forever or for five
>>>>>>> years,
>>>>>>> whichever comes first," he added.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> The Berkeley Art Museum Web site describes the problem:
>>>>>>> "Works of variable
>>>>>>> media art, such as performance, installation, conceptual and
>>>>>>> digital art,
>>>>>>> represent some of the most compelling and significant
>>>>>>> artistic creation of
>>>>>>> our time. ... Without strategies for cataloging and
>>>>>>> preservation, many of
>>>>>>> these vital works will eventually be lost to art history."
>>>>>>> There is
>>>>>>> growing
>>>>>>> concern about preserving digital documents and art among
>>>>>>> museum personnel,
>>>>>>> libraries and collectors. Digital art has joined with holograms,
>>>>>>> performance
>>>>>>> art, conceptual art and other time-based media creations that
>>>>>>> can be
>>>>>>> difficult for a museum to maintain or conjure up again or
>>>>>>> lend to another
>>>>>>> institution. While critical appreciation of digital-based art
>>>>>>> may be
>>>>>>> limited, there are questions being raised beyond the art itself.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "Preservation represents a continuum," said Carol Stringari,
>>>>>>> a senior
>>>>>>> conservator for contemporary art at the Solomon R. Guggenheim
>>>>>>> Museum in
>>>>>>> New
>>>>>>> York. "There have always been periods in history in which
>>>>>>> there was
>>>>>>> experimentation in art, and there have always been new
>>>>>>> materials. But the
>>>>>>> questions about preservation remain the same, regardless of
>>>>>>> the media. We
>>>>>>> must strive to understand the meaning and integrity of the
>>>>>>> work, which
>>>>>>> allows us to make informed decisions about its long-term
>>>>>>> preservation."
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Keeping alive art that is based on interactivity or computer
>>>>>>> code was not
>>>>>>> part of her training, Ms. Stringari said, and raises
>>>>>>> questions about
>>>>>>> maintaining a collection.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> For example:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> A Felix Gonzalez-Torres piece from 1991, "Untitled (Public
>>>>>>> Opinion)," was
>>>>>>> shown as a pile of cellophane-wrapped black licorice candies
>>>>>>> against a
>>>>>>> wall
>>>>>>> where people could remove them, changing the shape. To
>>>>>>> consider preserving
>>>>>>> the work for restaging, the museum dealt with the artist's
>>>>>>> estate (he died
>>>>>>> in 1996) on questions like whether the brand of candy was
>>>>>>> important; the
>>>>>>> pile's exact shape had to be kept; and the color or look of
>>>>>>> the candies
>>>>>>> must
>>>>>>> be the same.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "For the moment, those same candies are still available, but
>>>>>>> they may not
>>>>>>> always be available," although efforts have been made to specify
>>>>>>> acceptable
>>>>>>> parameters, she said.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> A computer-based presentation by Mark Napier from 2002 called
>>>>>>> "net.flag"
>>>>>>> invited visitors to use symbols from international flags to
>>>>>>> change a set
>>>>>>> of
>>>>>>> stars, among other things, a work partly intended to show how
>>>>>>> the Internet
>>>>>>> has dissolved national border limitations. The art is in the
>>>>>>> interactivity,
>>>>>>> which is difficult to preserve.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Video works by Nam June Paik, who died in January, were made
>>>>>>> on machinery
>>>>>>> using cathode ray tubes, on monitors giving way to plasma
>>>>>>> screens and with
>>>>>>> other technology. Conservators suggest that restaging his art
>>>>>>> reflects the
>>>>>>> discussion about intention versus physical replication
>>>>>>> involving hardware,
>>>>>>> which could change the work.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Art institutions have begun to look at these issues
>>>>>>> systematically. The
>>>>>>> Guggenheim is part of a collaborative project that includes
>>>>>>> the Berkeley
>>>>>>> Art
>>>>>>> Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Rhizome, an online community
>>>>>>> for digital
>>>>>>> artists, the Franklin Furnace Archive, the Walker Art Center in
>>>>>>> Minneapolis
>>>>>>> and the Cleveland Performance Art Festival and Archive. The
>>>>>>> National
>>>>>>> Endowment for the Arts granted the consortium $165,000 to
>>>>>>> create models
>>>>>>> for
>>>>>>> preservation. The Guggenheim linked with the Daniel Langlois
>>>>>>> Foundation
>>>>>>> for
>>>>>>> Art, Science and Technology to stage an exhibition and
>>>>>>> symposium on
>>>>>>> variable
>>>>>>> media art and emulation, which uses newer computers to run
>>>>>>> older software.
>>>>>>> And the Museum of Modern Art is working with the Tate Modern
>>>>>>> in London and
>>>>>>> the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art on related work.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "It is a paradox that the task is to preserve things that are
>>>>>>> not
>>>>>>> materials," said Lauren Cornell, executive director of
>>>>>>> Rhizome, which
>>>>>>> documents digital work by participating artists and works
>>>>>>> with the Museum
>>>>>>> of
>>>>>>> Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. "There really aren't any
>>>>>>> standards for
>>>>>>> how
>>>>>>> to do this. We're all testing out different ways to preserve
>>>>>>> work that is
>>>>>>> online and then goes out of date really, really quickly."
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> In addition to emulation, other preservation techniques
>>>>>>> include storing
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> original work and machinery, making computer copies or
>>>>>>> preparing extensive
>>>>>>> documentation.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Mr. Rinehart, a digital artist himself, said that questions
>>>>>>> about digital
>>>>>>> art may signify a larger issue. "Digital art, like all art,
>>>>>>> may be at the
>>>>>>> forefront of a larger question," he said. "What is rapidly
>>>>>>> developing is
>>>>>>> this black hole. In the future, people may look back and be
>>>>>>> able to see
>>>>>>> what
>>>>>>> was happening in the 18th century, the 19th century, and then
>>>>>>> will come a
>>>>>>> period in which we cannot tell what artists were working on.
>>>>>>> But this is
>>>>>>> not
>>>>>>> limited to the art world. This problem about retaining things
>>>>>>> will be for
>>>>>>> our collective social memory, and it will be of concern to
>>>>>>> everyone in
>>>>>>> every
>>>>>>> walk of life. Government documents, for example."
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Still, he added, the heart of computer-generated art
>>>>>>> "separates the
>>>>>>> logical
>>>>>>> from the physical."
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "We have worried about preserving the physical," he said.
>>>>>>> "Perhaps we
>>>>>>> should
>>>>>>> be worried more about preserving the logical." Mr. Rinehart
>>>>>>> has written
>>>>>>> academic proposals for creating documentation that is more
>>>>>>> akin to a music
>>>>>>> score