patrick lichty
Since the beginning
Works in Chicago, Illinois United States of America

PORTFOLIO (1)
BIO
Patrick Lichty is a digital intermedia artist, writer, and independent curator of over 15 years whose work comments upon the impact of technology on society and how it shapes the perception of the world around us. He works in diverse technological media, including activism, printmaking, kinetics, video, generative music, and neon. He is Editor-in Chief of Intelligent Agent, an electronic arts/culture journal, part of the activist group The Yes Men, and operates IALA Gallery in Baton Rogue, Louisiana.
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DISCUSSION

SL, Tools and Art


Patrick Lichty
- Interactive Arts & Media
Columbia College, Chicago
- Editor-In-Chief
Intelligent Agent Magazine
http://www.intelligentagent.com
225 288 5813

FAX 312 344-8021
voyd@voyd.com

"It is better to die on your feet
than to live on your knees."
Jim Andrews schreiben:

something like Word, there's no one claiming it's a work of art. it's a
tool. why? because it doesn't do too much toward shaping the user's
creation toward its own unique ends, and it supplies hardly any of the
content.

...

is there any work of art in sl more impressive than sl itself? sl as a
piece of net art?

************************************************************************
****

IMO, that's like saying asking what the difference between Word Perfect
and Finnegan's Wake is. That's the difference between a pencil and a
love letter. Cadmium Red canvas and brush, and Fragonard's Swing, a
clarinet and Rhapsody in Blue.

I took the bait, knowing this was a rhetorical question.

DISCUSSION

Second life tabloid scandals.


Salvatore, I really don't think you're a no-no, it's just that you're
reiterating something that's been done many times, and a lot of us have
seen it before.

You're asking the boilerplate questions, doing the boilerplate
interventions. It's solid stuff, but subjects we fought over in grad
school.

This stuff's at least 2-5 years old, and at least 18 mos. in Second
Life.
Now, questioning why virtual history isn't more common knowledge might
be a good one.

Maybe I'll go flood someone's yard tonight.
Hmmm.
Better yet, turn an entire sim into a lake.
That was my favorite trick.

Patrick Lichty
- Interactive Arts & Media
Columbia College, Chicago
- Editor-In-Chief
Intelligent Agent Magazine
http://www.intelligentagent.com
225 288 5813

FAX 312 344-8021
voyd@voyd.com

"It is better to die on your feet
than to live on your knees."

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-list@rhizome.org [mailto:owner-list@rhizome.org] On Behalf
Of Salvatore Iaconesi
Sent: Sunday, October 07, 2007 2:50 PM
To: list@rhizome.org
Subject: RHIZOME_RAW: Re: Re: second life dramas

Patrick Lichty said:

> He's protesting for pro-choice at Planned Parenthood...

wow.. you found out.. the internet is so powerful.

i actually enjoy watching some of you pretending i'm a no-no, and making
statements.
some of which i even agree with (as i said, i would have kicked myself
out of odyssey, too.. it's part of the game), some of which i don't. but
that's (first/second)life isn't it.

> First of all, I feel that it's great that Odyssey has its first troll.

:) just let me get my cave's texture right, and we're set.

and the: getting to the point

> Secondly, I ask what the function of the intervention was. Obviously,
it
> has gained some attantion, which is a core principle of tactical
media. But
> then, what is the sociocultural function?

raise questions on how real-world schemes transfer to virtuality, on the
way that our flesh-and-bones forms of perception and of social
interaction try to occupy spaces in which they make no sense, on the way
in which the collaborative digital spaces (not only SL, but also blogs,
for example) turn out to be spaces for ego, for closed-mutual-recursive
interaction.

On how globality is sometimes just another neighborhood, with houses
that are just a little farther apart.

And on the possibilities offered by accessible spaces ( but this is an
old issue. It sounds like "everyone is a musician, everyone is an
artist, everyone is a critic, everyone is a curator, everyone is a
journalist... " etcetera, and the obvious arising critique... don't take
this one too seriously..).

now: don't jump to conclusions too fast, as my position on these issues
1) doesn't matter that much and 2) it could be very different from what
you might guess by inspecting my actions, which are not declarative, but
investigative

> In my opinion, bombing Odyssey for perpetuating the banal
> mimetic recreation of boring traditional art is like striking
Greenpeace for
> not protecting the environment well enough.

and, about my actions: i did the same things all over second life.
I even posted a couple of them to rhizome, and a couple to odyssey, too!
the fact that i didn't look for coverage (on media, newsletters,
whatever) is just another story.
i posted this whole thing here because i thought it was both funny and
interesting, at the same time, and because i love rhizome as a platofrm
for discussion.
and i am quite enjoying the responses, too. If any of you want, i will
post a guy's 3 weeks of offenses he sent me for flooding his lawn on SL:
they're interesting, amusing and grotesque, at the same time.

but that's not the point, is it?

the point is being able to discern.

it's a recurring question that doesnt actually have a real answer.

it's, partly, about new media.
sometimes the question transforms into "how do i sell new media art"".
sometimes it transforms itself into "what *is* new media art?".
sometimes it transforms into "who are new media artists? who can say
'i'm a new media artist, and not a programmer?'"
sometimes even into "what do critics and curators want? they want to be
artists, too?"
sometimes also in "you infringed my
copyright/work/activity/fame/whatever. don't you know?"

and it's, partly, on virtual/digital environments. first part of this
question: are they really democratic? second part of the qustion: is the
fact that many try to put their analog_life schemes (part of them, at
least: studying the various cases is an interesting topic itself) into
digital spaces an evolution or a form of exhaust valve for real_life
frustrations?

these questions are, in a way, missing a part of the global perspective:
digital objects and spaces are different, in terms of immateriality, of
free replicability, of ubiquity, of the sources used to create them, of
the instruments used to experience them, and a whole lot more.

> If Salvatore wanted to question commercial mimetic practice, he could

> certainly go to the decor art island Artropolis which is marketing
itself
> similiarly to a Kinkaide-esque approach for Second Life, or any of the
other
> kitsch galleries. That is, aiming at mass marketing art using
SL-based
> memetics. Or look at half the artists covered in SLArt blog and have
at it.

well.. as a matter of fact, i did already :)

polygonal hugs!
s
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DISCUSSION

RHIZOME_RAW: second life dramas


As another artist who has been performing interventions into Second Life for
over a year now, solo, and as part of the performance art group Second
Front, I'd like to interject a few words.

First of all, I feel that it's great that Odyssey has its first troll. It's
a good sign that it has that kind of cachet, as I was pleased when
protesters advocating better heathcare for my institution's security guards
came to my college island during its inauguration. Trolling is a net
tradition pioneered by people like Kandinskii, nn, Brad Brace, and others.
It's a good tonic.

Secondly, I ask what the function of the intervention was. Obviously, it
has gained some attantion, which is a core principle of tactical media. But
then, what is the sociocultural function? I can understand if Sugar pulled
Sal's objects if they were taking the sim offline - from the text, there
didn't seem to be any desire for dialogue. And by reposting, it's certainly
possible that Sugar could get Sal's 6th avatar pulled from the database for
tems violation, but I really don't see the value in that.

Although I am not part of Odyssey's administration, I do know that it was
founded to create a space where people could try to develop new forms and
NOT engage in the reiterative transmediated kitsch that you see in Second
Life so often. In my opinion, bombing Odyssey for perpetuating the banal
mimetic recreation of boring traditional art is like striking Greenpeace for
not protecting the environment well enough. Not the best context, if you
ask me. Actually, Sugar used to get in trouble for object bombing as art
intervention herself until she got backing to create an alternative space.

Is it perfect? Absolutely not. Has it fulfilled the purpose 100%? No. But
it is a damned good example of places where people are trying to explore
virtual worlds in other ways than just reposting their anime images, porn or
watercolors.

If Salvatore wanted to question commercial mimetic practice, he could
certainly go to the decor art island Artropolis which is marketing itself
similiarly to a Kinkaide-esque approach for Second Life, or any of the other
kitsch galleries. That is, aiming at mass marketing art using SL-based
memetics. Or look at half the artists covered in SLArt blog and have at it.

But most of them are not here, and I think that is the point.

Second Front is banned from about a dozen servers, and mainly by people who
take us out of context, which is understandable given the culture of the SL
community. Sometimes our probes have gotten chaotic, but we have rarely
shown disrespect to anyone without a lot of provocation. We're an agitprop
group, and that happens.

I think what Sal's doing is interesting; he just framed it badly this time.
He's protesting for pro-choice at Planned Parenthood...

DISCUSSION

Where the Shill went...


And to fight the shill, we must use the shill itself!
Perfect!
Fish!

Patrick Lichty
- Interactive Arts & Media
Columbia College, Chicago
- Editor-In-Chief
Intelligent Agent Magazine
http://www.intelligentagent.com
225 288 5813

FAX 312 344-8021
voyd@voyd.com

"It is better to die on your feet
than to live on your knees."

-----Original Message-----
From: { brad brace } [mailto:bbrace@eskimo.com]
Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2007 11:25 AM
To: patrick lichty
Cc: list@rhizome.org; thingist@bbs.thing.net;
netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org; 'IDC list'
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Where the Rhizome went...

http://www.bbrace.net/blabbering-cronies.html

/:b

--
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.2/983 - Release Date: 9/1/2007
4:20 PM

DISCUSSION

Where the Rhizome went...


It's been asked why Rhizome, and for that matter a lot of listservs for
that matter, have dropped in the degree of content during the present
decade. There are a few lists out there that still have a lot of
content, traffic, but in general, Pall Thayer's observation that
listserv traffic has dropped considerably, at first glance, appears to
be true.

There is a real confluence of issues that has led to the issue at hand.
Most of what Curt Cloninger has said is true, but it seems to be around
a few key issues:
A change in the community
Different modes of content production/distribution
Different agendas of the next generation

In regards to the community, there is something to be said about the
Curt's comments of the 90's generation (who I call the Third Wave) of
New Media being in grad school/going academic. I see Cloninger is in
grad school now, as I remember Klima mentioning he was going to do, as
well as several others. That's what I did, and am now in my second year
as a prof in Chicago. Will probably start my PhD next year, as it looks
like an MFA in the states will not be enough in the long run.

In addition, a lot of the Third Wave have families and careers now, and
doubly do not have the time to participate like they used to. I know
that when Tribe and I were in Washington DC for the Renascence 07 show,
he had to leave early after the panel to take care of family matters.
Fortunately or not, I have to work 1900 km away from my family, which
gives me a touch more time.

Tribe, Galloway, Kanarek - most of them are academic now, a lot of
others had to focus on work or focusing their careers on sustainability.
I know I have a lot less time, and I've been streamlining my practice
again and again to maximize my time and effectiveness, and I hate when
art and Taylorism converge.

Content - the listserv, while vibrant in terms of lists like Empyre and
IDC, are largely 90's modes of communication. Instead of circulating
content, digital discourse has turned into a "booth" mentality, in which
bloggers pointcast and hope that people aggregate their blog. It isn't
about the collective discourse as much as a constellation of little
stations and brands. Many of them are structured so that they might
even make money from their brand of content, such as
ichanhascheezburger.com (a LOLcat site) that is the source of income now
for the creator.

The next generation of New Media artists (from which I am from the prior
gen) have a different set of agendas, priorities, and degrees of
support. For example, when Rhizome got started, it was, for the most
part, funded by odd revenue streams and Tribe's resources, as far as I
knew. As that ran out, Rhizome had to act like any other NPO...

Secondly, from having hung out for a long time, it was their primary
conceptual project for the first 2-3 years; I didn't see them out on a
lot of residencies, writing for other entities, maybe a little curation.
But from my vantage point, for the first couple years, the rhizome crew
didn't do much else.

And lastly, from two-three places from the preceding, although we are in
a period of "social media", it appears that it is a particulate cloud of
individuals trying to promote their own work/agendas and forming
alliances/networking for enlightened self-interest rather than acting
collectively. In many ways, it feels like grass-roots collectivism
versus free-market competition.

Much of this feel comes from the increased robustness of the art market,
acceptance of conceptual New Media, related objects, and the emergence
of media-influenced artists from Murakami to Arcangel. When there
weren't that many opportunities, we all had more time to hang out and
collaborate. Now that there are more possibilities to have a viable art
career, a lot of us are trying to make a go of it for a while.

It also comes from a difference from the way New Media artists are born.
Many of the ones I work with now were minted in the academy; I was one
of the last generations of autodidacts. New Media artists (sic) are
becoming part of the establishment, and while there is still the
somewhat segregated New Media community, the integration/cooptation
really started in 1998-2000 between net.condition, Whitney Bi 2000 and
the 100101010 show at the SF MoMA, all of which validated New Media as
an "art form"

Therefore, the new New Media artists are much more akin to their
"contemporaries" than to the previous generations of practitioners.
They're taught to be part of the Art World, to aggressively seek
galleries, media, get representation, find commissions, look at how to
bridge the material culture gap, build the practice. This is very
different from the 90's artist, who simply did not have these routes to
travel, more often than not.

An example of the difference between generations was an interaction with
someone who I had remarked about their level of promotion/aggressiveness
in networking, which actually got on my nerves a little. They gave me a
hug, and said, "Don't worry, we just have to get out there in our
business..." This revealed an epiphany of generational difference that
I had not realized until then, and I replied, "I guess you're right, but
for me, it's not a business, it's my _life_."

Therefore, there are a lot of different constituencies in the New Media
universe. There are collectivists, the non-profits, the academics, the
career artists. There are the 90's community types, the 00's
point-cloud "socials", the free radicals, the stars, and so on. But
what is obvious is that things have changed, and people notice. The
question remains; are there constituencies large enough to support truly
collective enterprises, or are we in a free-market, aggregate-sifting,
competitive pointcast culture? Although I am probably more akin to the
collectivist sort who would love to not worry about survival as I was in
the 90's, I ran out of resources, and now have to balance my time
between exploration, exhibition, and education. It's not a bad life,
but I'd certainly love to have my life in the late 90's back again, for
a lot of reasons.

Patrick Lichty
- Interactive Arts & Media
Columbia College, Chicago
- Editor-In-Chief
Intelligent Agent Magazine
http://www.intelligentagent.com
225 288 5813

FAX 312 344-8021
voyd@voyd.com