Nisar Keshvani
Since 2004
Works in Robinson Road United States of America

BIO
Singaporean Nisar Keshvani is a consultant, Internet journalist, web developer, educator and new media specialist. In the last decade, he has worked across five continents (Asia, Africa, Europe, North America and Australia/Oceania).

He is editor-in-chief of the Leonardo Electronic Almanac and International Co-Editor of fineArt forum - one of the Internet's longest runing arts publication. He has worked for various international magazines and newspapers since 1993.

Keshvani sits on the board of the Art, Science, Technology Network (ASTN), Leonardo/International Society for the Arts, Sciences & Technology; fineArt forum and on SIGGRAPH's Singapore Chapter Management Committee. He is Program Advisor (Asia Pacific) of the Brisbane Multimedia Art Asia Pacific (MAAP) Festival. Keshvani has extensive experience developing and maintaining websites and was an online journalism educator at Queensland University of Technology, Australia, examining internationalization issues and changing work practices in the online newsroom.

He is on sabbatical from lecturing in digital media at Ngee Ann Polytechnic's School of Film & Media Studies in Singapore. Currently, he is working for the Aga Khan Development Network (a group of international development agencies working in health, education, culture and rural and economic development, primarily in Asia and Africa). He is strategising and developing websites for their school and hospital services in India, Pakistan, East Africa, Bangladesh, Tajikistan and the Krygyz Republic.

Areas of interest include instructional science, curriculum development, new media technologies, media convergence, WWW development, online content management, technology in education and information architecture.
Discussions (7) Opportunities (8) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

LEA Feb '05: River of Many Sides


*sincere apologies for cross-posting*

Leonardo Electronic Almanac: February 2005
ISSN#1071-4391
art | science | technology - a definitive voice since 1993
http://lea.mit.edu

In this month's LEA, Irina Aristarkhova starts things off with an editorial in which she reflects on the "tyranny of the possible" that artists are presented with in their work with
various media. This tyranny, she argues, confronts artists with the need to make wise use of the myriad choices available to them.

In "Crossing the Bridge," Annette Barbier discusses the performance of River of Many Sides, an interactive media performance that involved the collaboration of artists from the
U.S.A. and Vietnam, as well as the many cross-cultural issues that arose out of the process. Unsurprisingly, what is known to Americans as "The Vietnam War" and to Vietnamese as "The American War" emerges as a central influence on the work.

From LEA's archive, first published in July 1994, Greg Garvey provides insight into his Automatic ConfessionMachine (ACM), and Stephen Bell explores the aesthetics of interaction in an article and anotated list of characteristics.

Leonardo Reviews brings us discussions of a festival and two conferences with some interesting meeting points: DEAF (the Dutch Electronic Arts Festival) '04, in which a central concern was the nexus between the electronic arts and consciousness studies; a conference of the American Synesthesia Association; and Consciousness Reframed: Qi and Complexity, which explored notions of consciousness, spirituality and the arts.

************************************************************************

Latest Calls for Papers
------------------------------

* Locative Media *

LEA is seeking papers on locative media, a condition of emergence, simultaneously opening up new ways of engaging in the world and mapping its own domain. For this issue, submissions that present the exploratory movements of Locative Media in historical context are of equal interest to submissions that offer a snap shot or polaroid of its current state of emergence.

Deadline for submissions: 7 March 2005
More info: http://mitpress2.mit.edu/e-journals/LEA/LEA2004/authors.htm#lmedia
Submit: lctvmedia [@] astn [dot] net

LEA Information and URLs
-------------------------------------------
Receive your FREE subscription to the Leonardo Electronic Almanac e-mail digest at http://mitpress.mit.edu/lea/e-mail -- just provide your email address, name, and password, and check off that you'd like to be added to the Leonardo Electronic Almanac monthly e-mail list to keep on top of the latest news in the Leonardo community.

How to advertise in LEA?
http://mitpress2.mit.edu/e-journals/Leonardo/isast/placeads.html#LEAads

For a paid subscription (to become an ISAST member and access archives dating back to 1993): http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=4&tid'&mode=p

The Leonardo Educators Initiative
-------------------------------------------------------
The Leonardo Abstracts Service (LABS) is a comprehensive database of abstracts of Ph.d, Masters and MFA theses in the emerging intersection between art, science and technology. Thesis Abstract Submittal form at http://leonardolabs.pomona.edu

LEA also maintains a discussion list open only to faculty in the field. Faculty wishing to join this list should submit their details @ http://mitpress2.mit.edu/e-journals/LEA/faculty.html

What is LEA?
----------------------
For over a decade, the Leonardo Electronic Almanac (LEA) has thrived as an international peer-reviewed electronic journal and web archive, covering the interaction of the arts, sciences and technology. LEA emphasizes rapid publication of recent work and critical discussion on topics of current excitement. Many contributors are younger scholars and artists, and there is a slant towards shorter, less academic texts.

Contents include Leonardo Reviews, edited by Michael Punt, Leonardo Research Abstracts of recent Ph.D. and Masters theses, curated Galleries of current new media artwork, and special issues on topics ranging from Artists and Scientists in times of War, to Zero Gravity Art, to the History of New Media.

Copyright© 1993 - 2005: The Leonardo Electronic Almanac is published by Leonardo / International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST) in association with the MIT Press. All rights reserved.

OPPORTUNITY

Space: Planetary Consciousness and the Arts


Deadline:
Wed Feb 02, 2005 18:49

Space: Planetary Consciousness and the Arts
9th Workshop and Symposium on Space and the Arts

May 19-21, 2005

Chateau d'Yverdon
Yverdon-les-Bains, Switzerland

Call for Papers
http://www.arsastronautica.com/workshop05/
workshop2005@arsastronautica.com

Objectives
The Workshop & Symposium on "Space: Planetary Consciousness and
the
Arts" aims to:

· provide a platform where ideas relating to the interaction
between space science, environmental science, philosophy and the
arts can be discussed and debated

· provide an environment where people, especially artists and
other "culture professionals" together with space and planetary
scientists can exchange ideas and projects about planetary
consciousness from the perspective of their unique backgrounds,
education and experiences

· provide a meeting place where space, art and environmental
projects can emerge and new teams and partnerships can be built

· nurture a domain of space activities that is becoming more
recognized in both the space community and in the mainstream art
world

· disseminate the ideas and projects by publicizing the results of
the event

Submission of Abstracts
Participation in the workshop will be limited to a maximum of 25
persons and participants will be selected upon review of abstracts
of presentations proposed for the workshop.

Abstracts, limited to one A4 page should be submitted via the
online form at http://www.arsastronautica.com/workshop05/ or sent
directly to: workshop2005@arsastronautica.com

The abstract should be in English and include:
· Workshop name
· Title of presentation
· Name and affiliation of authors
· Full contact details of presenting author, including postal and
e-mail addresses, phone and fax
· A short (maximum two paragraphs) personal biographical text

The deadline for abstract submission is February 28, 2005.

Following acceptance a complete paper will be required and the
author(s) will be invited to register for the event.

Timetable
28 February 2005 - Deadline for abstracts
31 March 2005 - Notification of acceptance
20 April 2005 - Preliminary programme
7 May 2005 - Deadline for papers
19-21 May 2005 - Workshop & Symposium

Workshop & Symposium Topics
Presentations can be about any aspect or issue related to "Space:
Planetary Consciousness and the Arts". Since the scope of the
Workshop
is large, potential authors might like to consider submitting
abstracts for papers addressing such topics as:

· the impact of space exploration on the arts and vice versa
· the impact of space science on the environmental consciousness
· the role of arts in expressing planetary consciousness
· the ethical aspects of space exploration and planetary
responsibility
· the impact of space exploration on philosophy and vice versa
· synergies between the arts, environmental and space communities
· the interaction between space, arts and the public
· using the arts to explore and comprehend space

Authors need not, of course, limit themselves to these topics.


OPPORTUNITY

LEA Special cfp: Locative Media - Deadline 7 March 2005


Deadline:
Sun Jan 30, 2005 08:30

LEA Special Issue: Locative Media

* Worldwide Call for Submissions *

Guest Editor: Drew Hemment
lctvmedia@astn.net
http://mitpress2.mit.edu/e-journals/LEA/LEA2004/authors.htm#lmedia

The Leonardo Electronic Almanac (ISSN No: 1071-4391) is inviting papers [and artworks] that deal with the emerging data-based spatial practice of Locative Media.

Across a broad range of contexts the interface between data environments and location has emerged as a central concern, reversing the trend towards digital content being viewed as placeless, or only encountered in the amorphous space of the internet. Artists have long been concerned with place and location, but the combination of mobile devices with positioning technologies opens up a manifold of different ways in which geographical space can be encountered and drawn. An emerging field of creative practice is coalescing around artists and technologists who are exploring the use of portable, networked, location-aware computing devices for social interfaces to places and artistic interventions in which geographical space becomes a canvas.

Submissions are sought which foreground not the technologies but rather issues to do with participation, perception and process they raise. What is Locative Media's relationship to dominant logics of representation, and how does it forces a reassessment of accustomed ways of representing, relating to and moving in the world? How may methodologies within Media Art and other disciplines be developed to meet a convergence of geographical and data space? How can collaborative or user-led mapping and cartography offer new possibilities for community organisation? What metaphors are available for these new kinds of spatial experience other than mapping and navigation? How may artists respond to the abstraction inherent in Locative Media as a data-based form, and look beyond the reductive understanding of location that comes from Geographic Information Systems - in which place is considered as a set of geographic coordinates or a wireless cell - to explore, for example, context, co-location and material embodiment? What is the relationship between this emerging critical art practice and both the surveillance and control technologies it deploys and wider mechanisms of domination? What taxonomies of Locative Media projects can be discerned, and how may terminology evolve to meet this new interdisciplinary environment?

Locative Media is in a condition of emergence, simultaneously opening up new ways of engaging in the world and mapping its own domain. For this issue, submissions that present the exploratory movements of Locative Media in historical context are of equal interest to submissions that offer a snap shot or polaroid of its current state of emergence.

Topics of interest might include (but are not limited to):
- Antecedents and historical context
- Taxonomies of Locative Media projects
- Art and technology collaborations
- Social applications
- Critical analyses
- Cultural analyses
- Scalability and ownership issues
- etc …

LEA encourages international artists / academics / researchers / students / practitioners / theorists that engage with locative media to submit their proposals for consideration. We particularly encourage authors outside North America and Europe to send proposals for essays / artists statements.

As part of this special, LEA is looking to publish:

- Critical Essays
- Artist Statement/works in the LEA Gallery
- Bibliographies (a peer reviewed bibliography with key texts/references in Locative Media)
- Academic Curriculum (LEA encourages academics conducting course programmes in this area to contact us)

Expressions of interest and outline should include:

- A brief description of proposed text (300 words)
- A brief author biography
- Any related URLs
- Contact details

In the subject heading of the email message, please use “Name of Artist/Project Title: LEA Locative Media Special - Date Submitted”. Please cut and paste all text into body of email (without attachments). Detailed editorial guidelines at: http://mitpress2.mit.edu/e-journals/LEA/submit

Deadline for expressions of interest: 7 March 2005

Timeline

7 March 2005 - submission of abstracts
11 March 2005 - short-listed candidates informed
1 April 2005 - contributors to submit full papers for peer review

(please note the timeline is subject to changes)

Please send proposals or queries to:
Drew Hemment
lctvmedia@astn.net

and
Nisar Keshvani
LEA Editor-in-Chief
lea@mitpress.mit.edu

http://lea.mit.edu


OPPORTUNITY

Job Notice in Conceptual/ Information Arts - San Francisco State University


Deadline:
Fri Jan 14, 2005 22:17

Job Opportunity

Art Department, San Francisco State University
Conceptual /Information Arts (Sabbatical Leave Replacement)
Fall,2005 and Spring 2006
Lecturer Level

Conceptual/Information Arts (CIA) is dedicated to preparing artists and media experimentors to work at the cutting edge of technology. It is one of several areas within the Art Department, located within a large, urban university.

Students in CIA learn contemporary digital production skills, work with newly emerging technologies, explore social and cultural impact of technology and study historical art practices, theoretical and conceptual ideas relevant to this area of the arts. Established in 1980, CIA has a long history as a pioneer program in providing students with opportunities to work with and study emerging technologies, as well as conceptual and critical approaches to art practice.

Principal faculty include professors Paula Levine and Stephen Wilson.

Information about the CIA is available at: http://userwww.sfsu.edu/~infoarts/

One of the principal professors in the area is taking a sabbatical leave AY 2005-2006. A one year replacement is sought. Possible examples of courses to be taught include: Conceptual Strategies, Robotics & Electronics, Interactive Media, Web Design, Digital Video, Biological Systems, Explorations in Word and Image. Practice and Theory in Emerging Technologies, Director/Lingo Programming, Theory Experiments in Narrative, Telecommunications based Art, Remote and Wireless systems. In addition, particular specialized courses can be adapted in response to the candidate's expertise.

The candidate is expected to have both practical and theoretical knowledge in the field of emerging technologies, cultural theory and contemporary art. The candidate will teach 3 courses each semester.

*MFA or Phd in relevant area
*Knowledge of digital technologies and relevant art theory
*Experience teaching courses in art & new technologies
*Exhibition record of recent artworks exploring art/technology/culture
(** Note the area is searching for candidates whose knowledge and interest go beyond use of new technology merely as presentation format )

Salary level: Because of budget restraints, this position is only funded at the lowest lecturer level 31-36,000/yr (unfortunately with no room to negotiate)

Period of Appointment:
Applications will be accepted for either full year or one semester.

Deadline for Applications: February 15 or until filled

Materials Requested: Mail cover letter (detailing background, interest in the CIA program, and courses that could be taught), curriculum vita, and url (if available). No other documentation is requested at this time. Additional documentation may be requested of candidates advancing to next round.

Mail to:
CIA Sabbatical Position,
Art Department, 1600 Holloway,
San Francisco State University, SF, CA 94132.

CIA Web information available at http://userwww.sfsu.edu/~infoarts


DISCUSSION

LEA Dec '04: From the Extraordinary to the Uncanny Part II


*sincere apologies for cross-posting*

Leonardo Electronic Almanac: December 2004
ISSN#1071-4391
art | science | technology - a definitive voice since 1993
http://lea.mit.edu
Subject: LEA Dec '04: From the Extraordinary to the Uncanny Part II

In LEA's December issue, guest editor Michael Punt presides over Part II of a special double-issue, based on the theme "From the Extraordinary to the Uncanny: The Unusual and Inexplicable in Art, Science and Technology."

Following this theme, the first article, by Peter Anders, explores intriguing parallels in the development of communications technology and spiritualist practices, including stage magic, in the nineteenth century; Josephine Coy discusses her project, *Media Ghosts*, in which images adapted from various news media "seemed to have emerged as if through a fissure between worlds," and describes the process of creation of the works.

Len Massey looks into various takes on the supernatural within the alternative media, finding an interesting contrast to the "saturated spin we are fed on a daily basis;" Pia Tikka looks at "Cinema and the Biological Basis of Otherness," discussing her view that interactive cinema can be seen as an "externalization of mind;" and C. S. Unnikrishnan makes a compelling case for the central role of "unobservables" in cosmology and physics, arguing that exploring the nature of such phenomena can even lead to profound spiritual insights.

In Leonardo Reviews, introduced by Robert Pepperell, Pia Tikka contributes a review of *Metacreation: Art and Artificial Life*, Sean Cubitt reviews *The Digital Sublime: Myth, Power and
Cyberspace* and Amy Ione reviews *Experiments in Form*.

We also take a look at the contents and selected abstracts from the first 2005 issue of *Leonardo*, while ISAST News brings us the latest events in the Leonardo/ISAST community. On a final, more somber note, John Milner brings us an obituary of the Russian artist Kirill Sokolov, a long-time supporter and contributor to the *Leonardo* journal.

********************************************************************************

LEA Information and URLs
-------------------------------------------
Receive your FREE subscription to the Leonardo Electronic Almanac e-mail digest at http://mitpress.mit.edu/lea/e-mail -- just provide your email address, name, and password, and check off that you'd like to be added to the Leonardo Electronic Almanac monthly e-mail list to keep on top of the latest news in the Leonardo community.

How to advertise in LEA?
http://mitpress2.mit.edu/e-journals/Leonardo/isast/placeads.html#LEAads

For a paid subscription (to become an ISAST member and access archives dating back to 1993): http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=4&tid'&mode=p

The Leonardo Educators Initiative
-------------------------------------------------------
The Leonardo Abstracts Service (LABS) is a comprehensive database of abstracts of Ph.d, Masters and MFA theses in the emerging intersection between art, science and technology. Thesis Abstract Submittal form at http://leonardolabs.pomona.edu

LEA also maintains a discussion list open only to faculty in the field. Faculty wishing to join this list should send a brief biography to lea [@] mitpress [dot] mit [dot] edu

What is LEA?
----------------------
For over a decade, Leonardo Electronic Almanac (LEA) has thrived as an international peer-reviewed electronic journal and web archive, covering the interaction of the arts, sciences and technology. LEA emphasizes rapid publication of recent work and critical discussion on topics of current excitement. Many contributors are younger scholars and artists, and there is a slant towards shorter, less academic texts.

Contents include Leonardo Reviews, edited by Michael Punt, Leonardo Research Abstracts of recent Ph.D. and Masters theses, curated Galleries of current new media artwork, and special issues on topics ranging from Artists and Scientists in times of War, to Zero Gravity
Art, to the History of New Media.

Copyright© 1993 - 2004: The Leonardo Electronic Almanac is published by Leonardo / International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST) in association with the MIT Press. All rights reserved.