Nick Briz
Since 2008
Works in Chicago, Illinois United States of America

BIO
Nick Briz is a new-media artist, educator, and organizer whose work has been shown internationally at festivals and institutions, including the FILE Media Arts Festival (Rio de Janeiro, BR); the Images Festival (Toronto, CA); the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; the Museum of Moving Image (NYC); Furtherfield Gallery (London, UK); Museo De Arte Contemporaneo de Caracas (Venezuela); Miami Art Basel;
Discussions (25) Opportunities (2) Events (3) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Question: curating/programing digital files



thanks Michael and Rosa, your comments have got me thinking.

Looking back, my post was a bit quick and vague - I should probably clarify some things. As you noticed Michael I'm referring to after the work has already been curated as opposed to a call for work, though I have to say I agree with everything you said (personally I get irritated when my options for "original format" are: 35mm, 16mm, 8mm, miniDV, HD - most of my digital video work doesn't fit into any of those categories - and sometimes its all). For my purposes I'm coming from an archival perspective (which is my role in this screening series). When I archive information from our events (Q&A's, Artist Talks, and Work Screened info) the card reads something like this:

TITLE OF WORK (2010, 16mm, color, sound, 42 min)

Most of the work we screen is film and fits nicely into this formula, but with digital works screened from a computer (which we've begun doing more and more) that "format" section (i.e. 16mm) gets tricky. Would you suggest, Michael, to go with "digital file"? That would, as you mentioned, avoid potential problems, for example the audience wrongly inferring artist intentions. For archival purposes it seems a bit ambiguous and nondescript... I'm split.

You bring up some good points Rosa, we should move away from standard descriptions, especially when they're based on models for other media - digital video and film share common traits but they're fundamentally different and your list of potential properties for particular files is a testament to that. I wonder though, will these properties become irrelevant [obsolete] in the future? Will codecs become a thing of the past as computers get better, stronger, faster? If yes, which are the properties/attributes of these files that are here now and will remain relevant latter?

Thanks again for the thoughts (more welcome and appreciated)
-Nick-

DISCUSSION

Question: curating/programing digital files


I'm working with a screening series and I'm a bit on the fence on a small (yet important) detail on our program/info notes: the section which denotes "exhibition format." For traditional moving image work it's simple, whatever it was you physically screened (i.e. 16mm, miniDV, etc.) but when projecting off a computer things get tricky. Rather than simply saying "digital file", what would be the best way to specify an exhibition format? Some go broad and say "SD" or "1080p", but this really refers to "resolution" rather than "format", should you then specify the file type? Would this mean simply the extension or better the codec?

thoughts?

-nick-

DISCUSSION

DISCUSSION

Destructural Video


Absolutely, in terms of glitch as a "medium-specific fault or flaw" there is an analog history that predates the digital one, and if we consider glitch as simply a disturbance/flaw in a system it has a history that can predate even electronic analog technology, Jon Satrom (A professor here at the Art Institute of Chicago and fellow glitch enthusiast) adopts a similar mindset. That there's a long history for the appreciation, or rather interest, in "errors" and/or "accidents" is for sure, I guess I've just been more taken by the digital kind (for varies reasons, including, as I mentioned before my interest in glitch's relation to digital culture).

good luck with you're dissertation, I'm very interested in reading it when you're finished!

DISCUSSION

Destructural Video


Hey John,

I'm currently working towards my MFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and my focus is very similar. We differ in that maybe I'm a bit more concerned with the digital glitch specifically, as I'm very interested in the way that it relates to digital culture. However, after looking at your blog I noticed there's definitely a lot of overlap in our interests. Some things:

Here's an article I wrote on Glitch Art recently:
http://fnewsmagazine.com/wp/2009/10/titleglitch-amp-arttitle/

I also put this together:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glitch_Art

Here's a link to some of my work:
http://www.nickbriz.com/videos/ANewEcology.mov
http://vimeo.com/4529527
http://rhizome.org/object.php?o=48468&m=1057411

I've also been very interested in curating this kind of work. I curated a program called Glitch Night in Orlando FL last year and I'm curating a program called Glitch: Investigations into the New Ecology of our Digital Age here's a flyer for that: http://nickbriz.com/New_ecology_poster.pdf
I can email you program notes/associated writings if you'd like.

Also here are others that have written on/worked with Glitch Art which you might find interesting:
Evan Meaney (evanmeaney.com)
http://evanmeaney.com/glitching/theory/evan_meaney_onglitching.pdf

Rosa Menkman (rosa-menkman.blogspot.com)
http://dl.getdropbox.com/u/1332959/Rosa%20Menkman%20-%20Artifacts%20and%20Critical%20Media%20Aesthetics.pdf

Iman Moradi (http://www.organised.info/)
http://designingimperfection.com/
http://www.oculasm.org/glitch/download/Glitch_dissertation_print_with_pics.pdf

Richard Almond (http://blog.rafolio.co.uk/)
http://rafolio.co.uk/maadm/thesis/projectreportweb.pdf

Hope this helps, There's a lot more where this came from, just let me know.
-Nick-
(nickbriz@gmail.com)