Michael Connor
Since 2002
Works in Brooklyn, New York United States of America


Shana Moulton and Nick Hallett's 'Whispering Pines 10' on Art21


Wake up, sleepyhead. Art21 just posted their profile of Shana Moulton and Nick Hallett's opera, Whispering Pines 10, presented by Rhizome at the New Museum in 2011. Not only do Moulton and Hallett come off as the sweetest performance artist/composer collaborative duo ever, but the documentation of the projection-oriented opera isn't bad either.


DNS Politics: Citizen journalism after the Twitter ban


Photograph posted to Twitter by Engin Onder on March 20, 2014, with the caption: "‪#twitter‬ blocked in ‪#turkey‬ tonight. folks are painting ‪#google‬ dns numbers onto the posters of the governing party." The poster shows the AKP candidate for Eskişehir.

Last Friday, DNS-themed graffiti and memes began to appear in Turkish streets and on the web, bringing the normally unnoticed architecture of the internet into public discourse.

The sudden focus on DNS, the system that translates a URL into its corresponding numerical IP address, was prompted by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's decision on March 20 to ban Twitter. Court orders were issued to Turkish internet service providers, who apparently implemented DNS redirects, meaning that requests for "twitter.com" would be routed to a different IP address and shown a warning page.

This kind of block is not particularly effective; users can easily circumvent it by using a public DNS server. Instead of sending the request for twitter.com to a Turkish ISP, users could simply change their computer's network settings and send the request to Google or OpenDNS, or any number of international, publicly available DNS servers. While this is easy to do, it's perhaps not widely understood, and so fans of internet freedom took to the web and the streets to spread the word about the DNS workaround. 


The Commenter: A Lament


This post was composed in one hour in front of an online audience for the Rhizome Internet Telethon 2014.

Tom Moody, Double Buckyball (detail of work in process), 2004, mixed media, approx. 60 x 40 inches.

Nearly a year ago, and not long after I started working at Rhizome, I published a post called “Breaking the Ice,” inviting the community to leave their thoughts about our curatorial and editorial direction. It took a while to get started, but eventually some of the Rhizome old timers latched on and got the ball rolling. As my introduction to the Rhizome community in my new role, it painted quite a picture. Heated opinions were debated, n00bs were put in their place, and frustrations were vented. Despite a sometimes negative tone, I was excited by the energy that people brought to it. And the fact that, y’know, people were commenting on Rhizome.org, a non-profit website that serves as an important cultural archive, rather than on a for-profit site that will sell your data to the highest bidder.


Ten Seconds to Hypertext Oblivion


 

Before reading this, you may as well play the game. It's only ten seconds long. But, I recommend that you do it late at night, and all by yourself. OK, here's the link. 

Begin.

Blue helvetica typeface displayed on a black background. You click, and a timer appears on screen, counting off ten seconds. 

In the end, like you always said, it's just the two of you together. You have ten seconds, but there's so much you want to do: kiss her, hold her, take her hand, tell her.

This is game designer Anna Anthropy's queers in love at the end of the world (2013), a work made using the Twine interactive storytelling platform that is as much video game as it is hypertext fiction. In keeping with hypertext tradition, one navigates the work by clicking on highlighted words to choose among narrative threads, playing out one of several imagined end-of-the-world interactions as quickly as possible, from biting to fucking to handholding, before time runs out. 


Liquid Crystal Palace: Jeremy Blake and his new peers


Jeremy Blake, Liquid Villa, 1999 Digital C-print 29 x 84 inches Edition of 3 + 1AP

Rhizome Editor and Curator Michael Connor, in his prior capacity as an independent curator, co-organized Liquid Crystal Palaceopening on March 1. Because of its relevance to the Rhizome community, we felt it was worth publishing Michael's writing about the show. Rhizome.org will also present Blake's Liquid Villa as a front page exhibition on March 6 from 3pm to 5pm EST, courtesy Kinz Fine Art and Honor Fraser Gallery.

Jeremy Blake's work seemed to be everywhere in the early 2000s. At the time, I was aware that he was successful in a commercial context, and that he didn't really see himself as a new media artist. (Blake always described himself as a painter.) Both of these things annoyed me about him, because I liked new media art, and I took some perverse pride in its lack of market recognition. It was therefore somewhat annoying that I liked the work. It seemed unsettling and druggy and dangerous, and it felt funny and good in my brain.

Since Blake's tragic death, I've rarely seen the work anywhere, and it sometimes pops into my head. So last year, I decided to look at it again, or as much as I could get my hands on. I was living near LA, and I brought my 2-month old daughter to the highly accommodating Honor Fraser Gallery to go through a stack of DVDs. This time around, Blake suddenly seemed closely connected with a number of other artists working today. The connections that emerged in this new viewing began a thought process that culminated in the exhibition Liquid Crystal Villa, opening tomorrow at Honor Fraser and co-curated with Nate Hitchcock.



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DISCUSSION

Commissions Deadline Extended to May 15


Hi Vic, It's definitely not required to have a partner confirmed - although your proposal would be that much stronger if you did.

One clarification: there WILL be commissions given to non-New York projects as well!

DISCUSSION

Commissions Deadline Extended to May 15


Yes! One person needs to be main point of contact but you can have multiple collaborators.

DISCUSSION

Breaking the Ice


Here is what Daniel's original comment - the one that Rob quoted prior to his IQ comment - made me think: "That's interesting; maybe archiving discussions is one of the things that is increasing the potential reputation cost of posting for many people." There are very interesting examples (such as 4Chan) where the lack of archiving encourages certain kinds of participation.

I can tell you from our brief collaboration so far that Daniel O'Rourke is a very perceptive individual, and he is definitely someone I would like to have as an active participant here. I don't really agree that Rob's reply was a passionate defense of a specific idea nor a step towards greater clarity. It did slightly come off as hazing. In fact, this is an example of the difficulties with the claim that listserves are inherently democratic - in fact, as with any social gathering, they have certain hierarchies and power dynamics that are carefully negotiated, and regulated through acts like firing a few warning shots across the bow of a newcomer.

(Sorry, Rob, now you're caught in the crossfire... I know we're blowing your comment out of all proportion now.)

DISCUSSION

Breaking the Ice


We won't really do that. It would be a terrible idea.

The Readers Survey does reflect the fact that Rhizome has a blog on its front page, and that website content is less horizontal than it once was.

Plenty of food for thought.

DISCUSSION

Breaking the Ice


I think a members survey or community survey is a very different thing from a readers survey. We could also run a commissioned artists' survey, but this would not mean that we see everyone who uses the site as a commissioned artist. Next time we'll call it a lurkers survey.