Mark Tribe
Since 2004
Works in New York, New York United States of America

PORTFOLIO (1)
BIO
Mark Tribe is an artist whose work explores the intersection of media technology and politics. His photographs, installations, videos, and performances are exhibited widely, including recent solo projects at Momenta Art in New York, the San Diego Museum of Art, G-MK in Zagreb, and Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions. Tribe is the author of two books, The Port Huron Project: Reenactments of New Left Protest Speeches (Charta, 2010) and New Media Art (Taschen, 2006), and numerous articles. He is Chair of the MFA Fine Arts Department at School of Visual Arts in New York City. In 1996, Tribe founded Rhizome, an organization that supports the creation, presentation, preservation, and critique of emerging artistic practices that engage technology.
Discussions (109) Opportunities (17) Events (22) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Fwd: Call for Public Domain Stories


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Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

>From: "Ann Deville" <adeville@publicknowledge.org>
>Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 16:21:50 -0400
>
>Call for Public Domain Stories.
>
>Attached, and copied below, are details of the collaboration between
>Public Knowledge, Creative Commons, and The Center for the Study of the
>Public Domain on a public-education campaign that will document creators'
>positive or negative experiences with current copyright, trademark and/or
>patent laws. We're interested in hearing from artists, filmmakers,
>musicians, computer programmers and anyone who has been hampered by
>restrictive intellectual property laws or assisted by the public domain.
>The stories will play an important role in demonstrating the need for
>policy change.
>
>We'd love it if you'd help us distribute the call--please forward it to
>anyone who may be interested, post it on appropriate mailing lists,
>use it in newsletters, insert it into bottles and cast them to sea or
>anyway you'd like.
>
>Information on how to participate is included. If you wish to be removed
>from this email list, please contact Ann DeVille at
>adeville@publicknowledge.org.
>
>Thank you for your interest and we look forward to hearing from you.
>
>*******************************************************************************************************************************************************
>
>
>STRUGGLES WITH IP LAW
>A Call for Stories in Support of a Robust Public Domain
>
>We know youve got a great story, and we want you to tell it.
>
>Public Knowledge, Creative Commons, and The Center for the Study of the
>Public Domain are collaborating on a public-education campaign that will
>highlight the struggles of
>creators with intellectual property law. We are collecting stories of
>citizens who are hampered by restrictive intellectual property laws. If
>you have a personal story of copyright,
>trademark or patent laws needlessly hindering your work and ideas, we want
>to hear from you. Conversely, if your work has benefited from the
>availability of art and information
>in the public domain, we want to know about it.
>Wed like to hear stories from artists, authors, musicians, filmmakers,
>computer programmers, entrepreneurs, librarians or anyone with a personal
>story involving intellectual
>property law. Your stories are important because American copyright,
>trademark and patent law, grounded in Article I of the Constitution, are
>designed to promote individual
>creativity and innovation: we need to make sure they're functioning in
>this way.
>Unfortunately, the recent expansion of intellectual property laws has had
>the opposite effect. New laws are discouraging creativity and innovation
>rather than encouraging it,
>and stifling other important values such as freedom of speech. Longer
>copyright terms, the end of copyright registration requirements, stronger
>trademark laws and the expansion
>of patent eligibility are some of the changes that have spurred this trend.
>When intellectual property laws curtail creativity, we need to be creative
>in a different way by pushing for changes in the laws, ensuring that they
>are interpreted more
>narrowly, and working to change a culture in which large copyright and
>patent owners seek to extract large fees for even the most incidental use
>of their work.
>None of these changes will take place unless we can demonstrate that there
>is a need for change. Policymakers can be educated about these issues, but
>in order to make the case,
>we need your contribution.
>Maybe you are a filmmaker who has been told to pay a large licensing fee
>for a four second snippet of a copyrighted work. Or the director of a
>community orchestra who cannot
>afford to play any new music. Or maybe youre a writer who has taken the
>works of Margaret Mitchell, Dickens or Shakespeare and created successful
>derivative works. Perhaps
>you are an artist who has used commercial images like the Campbells Soup
>can. We need your stories to embody the problems and successes of
>copyright, trademarks and
>patents for the general public.
>Please email your story to pk@publicknowledge.com with Public Domain
>Stories in the header. Well present your stories to legislators, press
>and the general public through
>a website, video and other media. Please provide your name and a phone
>number where we can reach you during the day and tell us if you would
>prefer to remain anonymous
>when we publish your story.
>Your story can help others to understand how access to ideas and
>creativity is being locked up by needlessly restrictive new laws.
>Questions? Comments or suggestions? Give
>us a call at (202) 518-0020 or email us pk@publicknowledge.org.
>****************************************************************************************************************
>Public Knowledge is a non-profit advocacy organization that seeks to
>ensure that copyright, patent, trademark and technology laws and policies
>promote the interests of the public.
>This Washington, D.C.-based group works with a wide spectrum of
>stakeholders, including libraries, educators, scientists, artists,
>musicians, journalists, consumers, programmers,
>
>civic groups and enlightened businesses, to promote certain fundamental
>democratic principles and cultural values openness, access, and the
>capacity to create and
>compete and to ensure these principles are reaffirmed in the digital
>age. For more information, see http://www.publicknowledge.org.
>
>Creative Commons, a non-profit corporation, promotes the creative re-use
>of intellectual works whether owned or public domain. It is sustained by
>the generous support of The
>Center for the Public Domain and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur
>Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it
>shares staff, space, and
>inspiration with the school's Center for Internet and Society. For more
>information, see www.creativecommons.org.
>
>The Center for the Study of the Public Domain at Duke Law School was
>founded in September of 2002, as part of the schools wider intellectual
>property program. Its mission
>is to promote research and scholarship on the contributions of the public
>domain to speech, culture, science and innovation, to promote debate about
>the balance needed in our
>intellectual property system and to translate academic research into
>public policy solutions. For more information, see
>http://www.law.duke.edu/cspd/index.html.

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Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"

<html>
<body>
<br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite>From: &quot;Ann Deville&quot;
&lt;adeville@publicknowledge.org&gt;<br>
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 16:21:50 -0400<br>
<br>
C<font face="arial" size=2>all for Public Domain Stories.<br><br>
Attached, and copied below, are details of the collaboration between
Public Knowledge, Creative Commons, and The Center for the Study of the
Public Domain on a public-education campaign that will document creators'
positive or negative experiences with current copyright, trademark and/or
patent laws. We're interested in hearing from artists, filmmakers,
musicians, computer programmers and anyone who has been hampered by
restrictive intellectual property laws or assisted by the public domain.
The stories will play an important role in demonstrating the need for
policy change.<br><br>
We'd love it if you'd help us distribute the call--please forward it to
anyone who may be interested, post it on appropriate mailing lists,<br>
use it in newsletters, insert it into bottles and cast them to sea or
anyway you'd like.<br><br>
Information on how to participate is included. If you wish to be removed
from this email list, please contact Ann DeVille at<br>
adeville@publicknowledge.org.<br><br>
Thank you for your interest and we look forward to hearing from you.
<br>
&nbsp;<br>
*******************************************************************************************************************************************************<br>
&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
</font><font face="arial" size=4><b>STRUGGLES WITH IP
LAW</b></font><font face="arial" size=2><br>
<b><i>A Call for Stories in Support of a Robust Public
Domain</i></b><br>
&nbsp;<br>
We know youve got a great story, and we want you to tell it. <br><br>
</font><pre>Public Knowledge, Creative Commons, and The Center for the
Study of the Public Domain are collaborating on a public-education
campaign that will highlight the struggles of
creators with intellectual property law.&nbsp; We are collecting stories
of citizens who are hampered by restrictive intellectual property laws.
If you have a personal story of copyright,
trademark or patent laws needlessly hindering your work and ideas, we
want to hear from you. Conversely, if your work has benefited from the
availability of art and information
in the public domain, we want to know about it.
</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>Wed like to hear stories from artists, authors, musicians,
filmmakers, computer programmers, entrepreneurs, librarians or anyone
with a personal story involving intellectual
property law. Your stories are important because American copyright,
trademark and patent law, grounded in Article I of the Constitution, are
designed to promote individual
creativity and innovation: we need to make sure they're functioning in
this way. </pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>Unfortunately, the recent expansion of intellectual property laws
has had the opposite effect.&nbsp; New laws are discouraging creativity
and innovation rather than encouraging it,
and stifling other important values such as freedom of speech.&nbsp;
Longer copyright terms, the end of copyright registration requirements,
stronger trademark laws and the expansion
of patent eligibility are some of the changes that have spurred this
trend. </pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>When intellectual property laws curtail creativity, we need to be
creative in a different way by pushing for changes in the laws, ensuring
that they are interpreted more
narrowly, and working to change a culture in which large copyright and
patent owners seek to extract large fees for even the most incidental use
of their work. </pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>None of these changes will take place unless we can demonstrate that
there is a need for change. Policymakers can be educated about these
issues, but in order to make the case,
we need your contribution.
</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>Maybe you are a filmmaker who has been told to pay a large licensing
fee for a four second snippet of a copyrighted work. Or the director of a
community orchestra who cannot
afford to play any new music. Or maybe youre a writer who has taken the
works of Margaret Mitchell, Dickens or Shakespeare and created successful
derivative works. Perhaps
you are an artist who has used commercial images like the Campbells Soup
can. We need your stories to embody the problems and successes of
copyright, trademarks and
patents for the general public.
</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>Please email your story to pk@publicknowledge.com with Public Domain
Stories in the header.&nbsp; Well present your stories to legislators,
press and the general public through
a website, video and other media. Please provide your name and a phone
number where we can reach you during the day and tell us if you would
prefer to remain anonymous
when we publish your story.
</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>Your story can help others to understand how access to ideas and
creativity is being locked up by needlessly restrictive new laws.
Questions? Comments or suggestions? Give
us a call at (202) 518-0020 or email us
pk@publicknowledge.org.</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>****************************************************************************************************************</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>Public Knowledge is a non-profit advocacy organization that seeks to
ensure that copyright, patent, trademark and technology laws and policies
promote the interests of the public.
This Washington, D.C.-based group works with a wide spectrum of
stakeholders, including libraries, educators, scientists, artists,
musicians, journalists, consumers, programmers,
</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>
civic groups and enlightened businesses, to promote certain fundamental
democratic principles and cultural values openness, access, and the
capacity to create and
compete and to ensure these principles are reaffirmed in the digital
age.&nbsp; For more information, see
<a href="http://www.publicknowledge.org/" eudora="autourl">http://www.publicknowledge.org</a>.</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>&nbsp;</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>Creative Commons, a non-profit corporation, promotes the creative
re-use of intellectual works whether owned or public domain. It is
sustained by the generous support of The
Center for the Public Domain and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur
Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it
shares staff, space, and
inspiration with the school's Center for Internet and Society. For more
information, see
<a href="http://www.creativecommons.org/" eudora="autourl">www.creativecommons.org</a>.</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>&nbsp;</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
<pre>The Center for the Study of the Public Domain at Duke Law School was
founded in September of 2002, as part of the schools wider intellectual
property program. Its mission
is to promote research and scholarship on the contributions of the public
domain to speech, culture, science and innovation, to promote debate
about the balance needed in our
intellectual property system and to translate academic research into
public policy solutions.&nbsp; For more information, see
<a href="http://www.law.duke.edu/cspd/index.html" eudora="autourl">http://www.law.duke.edu/cspd/index.html</a>.</pre><font face="Courier New, Courier"></font><br>
</blockquote></body>
</html>

--=====================_21829439==.ALT--

DISCUSSION

Fwd: Sundance Online Film Festival Call For Entries


>From: "Sundance Online Film Festival" <online@sundance.org>
>Subject: Sundance Online Film Festival Call For Entries
>Organization: The Sundance Institute
>Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 15:04:38 -0700
>
>The Sundance Film Festival is announcing its fourth annual Sundance Online
>Film Festival, which showcases the most innovative and creative
>storytellers using new digital technology. We invite all emerging and
>established digital artists, filmmakers, and storytellers to submit works
>in the following competitive categories:
>
>
>
>Animation- Animation showcase will display some of the immense talent
>working with cutting edge technology to create stories and images that
>resonate.
>
>
>
>Short Subject- fiction and nonfiction short films sampling various types
>of storytelling.
>
>
>
>New Forms- Comprising some of the most innovative work by media makers
>using interactive, non-linear and new forms. New Forms will present a
>diverse selection of works that range from entire imaginary environments
>to full immersion documentaries to three-dimensional experimental
>journeys, and points to the future of storytelling.
>
>
>
>Gallery- The living platform for artists, live web art, is an emerging art
>form. This non-competitive section showcases an eclectic collection of
>websites constructed to function primarily as on line aesthetic galleries,
>story presentations and the early stages of long form new media. Ideal
>works include visual environments, action paintings, and mini video
>loops. Must include video or motion graphics of some kind.
>
>
>
>
>
>Deadline: September 12, 2003
>
>
>For more information and submission Form go to:
><http://www.sundance.org/>www.sundance.org

DISCUSSION

DIGI-ARTS: Prizewinner announcement for the "Digital Pluralism - UNESCO Digital Arts Award 2003"


+ + +

Dear friend,
The DIGI-ARTS team has pleasure in announcing the Prizewinner of the
Digital
Pluralism - UNESCO Digital Arts Award 2003.
The jury committee meeting was held at IAMAS (Institute of Advanced
Media
Arts and Sciences, Japan) in Ogaki, Gifu Japan on 17, 18 July 2003 with
the
presence of the following jury members: Elaine Ng (President of Jury
committee, Independent curator in contemporary and new media art,
China),
Ibrahima Ndiaye (Professor, Universite Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar,
Senegal),
Diana Domingues (Professor, University of Caxias do Sul, Brazil),
Gerfried
Stocker (Director, Ars Electronica, Austria), Azza El-Hassan
(Independent
filmmaker, Palestine), Itsuo Sakane (President Emeritus, IAMAS), Hiroshi
Yoshioka (Professor, IAMAS), Kae Hirai* (Member of the Board of
Directors,
National Federation of UNESCO Associations in Japan), Christa Sommerer
(Associate Professor, IAMAS), and Tereza Wagner (Deputy team leader,
Digi-Arts Project, UNESCO Headquarters).

***

Out of the 122 high quality applications from 49 countries all over the
world that we have received, the first prize goes to:
Mwanya Chanda, a 25 year old artist from Zambia. Mr. Chanda will receive
US$5000 plus a six months artist-in-residency at IAMAS, during which he
will
complete his proposed project. His proposal centers around the use of
internet-based technologies as communication tools, much as the African
drum
once allowed subtle long-distance communication between distant village
communities. His "Caught in the Web" proposal is an ideal example of
digital
pluralism, starting from his ideas about communication within his
country
but being extended to multicultural level.

The second prize of US$3000 has been awarded to URTICA, an art and media
research group from Serbia and Montenegro for their project entitled
"Mouse
Says: click! and Human Says: eek!", a rather playful computer-based
lexicon
of what is described as "primal communication".

The third prizewinner of US$2000 is Ms. Cobi Van Tonder from South
Africa
for "Ephemeral Gumboots", which uses sensor-equipped rubber boots to
illustrate digital variations in global music and dancing.

The jury has also decided to present eight honorary mentions to the
following artists:
Ms. Andrea Polli (USA), Mr. Markku Reunanen (Finland), Mr. Hung Shek
Ngan
(Canada/Hong Kong), Mr. Jiro Ishihara (Japan), Ms. Kristi Trinier
(Canada),
Ms. Margaret Tan (Singapore), Mr. John Gerrard (Ireland) + Mr. Robert
Praxmarer (Austria), and Mr. Padipark Mesomboonpoonsuk (United Arab
Emirates).

***
Lastly, we would like to express our appreciation to all the applicants
and
the jury members who have contributed to making the UNESCO Digital Arts
Award 2003 fruitful. We would also like to ask for future support for
the
following UNESCO Digital Arts Award 2004, to be held within the
framework of
ISEA 2004 in Stockholm, Tallinn, Helsinki on 14-22 August 2004.
(http://www.isea2004.net/ <http://www.isea2004.net/> ).
***

Thank you for your attention and with kind regards,
DIGIARTS Team
00.33.1.45.68.47.02
Digiarts@unesco.org <mailto:Digiarts@unesco.org>
http://portal.unesco.org/digiarts <http://portal.unesco.org/digiarts>
***

DISCUSSION

NYTimes.com Article: Clash, Then Synthesis: Joys of a Laptop Jam


A story on Share, a very cool NYC laptop music event, from today's NY Times:

+ + +

Clash, Then Synthesis: Joys of a Laptop Jam

By JOHANNA JAINCHILL

IN his native West Virginia, George Cicci arouses curiosity
when he gets on stage at local open-mike events and turns
out beats on his iBook laptop between sets of bluegrass
guitarists and rockabilly bands. While the crowd is always
receptive to the innovative sounds he mixes, he says, he is
still the only laptop musician around.

Last month he found a community of kindred spirits in
Manhattan, where he was a featured guest at Openair, an
East Village bar where dozens of laptop artists play
together each week in an open jam session.

Openair is an indistinct lounge at 121 St. Marks Place with
tinted windows and no sign. The door is barely noticeable
but for a few smokers gathered outside. Yet every Sunday
starting at 5 p.m., the bar draws performers with laptops
in tow to share their musical and visual creations,
composed or improvised.

"It's not far from a traditional music jam where people
bring instruments and play together in a band," said Geoff
Matters, 26, one of the event's founders. "It's just that
the instruments people are using are software and hardware
tools."
...

complete article available online at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/10/technology/circuits/10jamm.html?ex58942500&ei=1&en

OPPORTUNITY

ISEA IS NOW ACCEPTING BIDS TO HOST ISEA2006


Deadline:
Fri Jul 11, 2003 13:03

ISEA IS NOW ACCEPTING BIDS TO HOST ISEA2006

*MISSION*

The series of symposia known as the International Symposium on Electronic Art was initiated in 1988 to create and maintain an international network of organizations and individuals active in the field of electronic arts. In 1990 this network took shape as an association, founded in The Netherlands, called the Inter-Society for the Electronic Arts (ISEA).

ISEA was established to oversee the continuance of the symposia and each symposium promotes the aims and objectives of the Inter-Society: the event and the society are therefore mutually supportive. Both ISEA and the Symposium are dedicated to the interdisciplinary and cross-cultural communication/cooperation between the arts and the fields of technology, science, education, and industry. Beyond its integral support of the symposium ISEA also realizes its mission by supporting other events, developing partnerships, implementing culturally diverse initiatives, as well as through publishing and archiving. ISEA is committed to collaboration, membership participation, and the creation of new work.

The aims of the Inter-Society and of the ISEA symposia are

- the promotion of communication between organizations and individuals active in the field of the electronic arts

- the creation of a structured approach towards the problems and potentials of electronic art.

- the promotion of interdisciplinary and cross-cultural communication/cooperation between the arts and the fields of technology, science, education, and industry.

- research, presentation and exhibition of work related to ISEA's mission.

For information on previous ISEA symposia, please see the ISEA website: http://www.isea-web.org/eng/sympos.html

*SUBMISSION GUIDELINES*

Submissions will be accepted from:

Category 1: (Educational) institutes (universities, art schools, museums etc.), (artistic, cultural or scientific) organizations, government bodies, etc;

Category 2*: Congress organizing bureaus;

Category 3**: Umbrella organizations created for the purpose of hosting an ISEA Symposium.

*Category 2 applicants must be able to demonstrate evidence of organizing earlier, comparable and successful events.

**Category 3 applicants must show evidence of support and thus prove the feasibility of their financial plan.

*GUIDELINES FOR SYMPOSIUM HOST CANDIDATES*

All candidates are strongly advised to carefully read through the recently revised "Guidelines for Symposium Host Candidates" on the ISEA website at before they submit their letter of intent.

If you cannot access these guidelines online, please contact ISEA HQ at for a copy of the guidelines.

*SELECTION PROCESS AND DEADLINES*

The ISEA Board of Directors currently invites those interested in hosting ISEA2006 to manifest their interest. The following schedule applies to this call for bids:

AUGUST 15, 2003: Deadline for letters of interest - indicating location, host organization, year, and (if possible) dates of the proposed Symposium SEPTEMBER 15, 2003 - Board vote on submissions OCTOBER 30, 2003 - Deadline for full proposals NOVEMBER 30, 2003 - Announcement of ISEA2006 host

*CONTACT INFORMATION*

All letters of intent must be sent by post, fax or email to ISEA HQ by August 15, 2003. No late submissions will be accepted.

ISEA, Inter-Society for the Electronic Arts Pieter de Hoochstraat 38-2 1071 EG Amsterdam The Netherlands T: +31 20 6120297 F: +31 20 6182359 E: info@isea-web.org http://www.isea-web.org