mark cooley
Since 2002
Works in United States of America

PORTFOLIO (9)
BIO
Mark Cooley is an interdisciplinary artist interested in exploring the intersections of art, activism and institutional critique in a variety of contexts. Subjects of particular interest are U.S. foreign policy, corporate culture, and the political economy of new technologies. Recently, Mark has focused his attention on food production and consumption and the ways in which artists may mediate in these processes.

http://www.flawedart.net


The New American Dictionary


The Boston-based performance group Institute for Infinitely Small Things has published a book called The New American Dictionary.

The dictionary highlights the terminology of fear, security and war that has permeated American English post 9-11. It includes 68 new terms i.e. Preparedness and Freedom Fries as well as terms that have recently been redefined i.e. Torture.

The dictionary also has an interactive dimension. 58 terms are left undefined for the reader to pencil in their own definition. Furthermore, readers are invited to submit their additions to the institute for a possible inclusion in the 2nd edition.

The New American Dictionary is available at several online stores.

www.newamericandictionary.com

READ ON »


exhaust emissions balloons


exhaust_emissions.jpg
a huge balloon, tied to a car�s vent-pipe, depicting the amount of exhaust emissions a car releases a day.

the "bursting earth" project is similar, but more dynamic. activists attach world globe balloons on exhaust pipes of cars in Berlin. the exhaust gas inflates the ballons. after the message becomes readable, there is a big "bang".

[link: frederiksamuel.com & adsoftheworld.com & 20to20.org]

READ ON »


WoW!


Aram Bartholl is a german artist renowned for making physical abstractions of the digital world, particularly game-worlds.

One of Aram's not-to-be-missed performances is inspired by the popular computer game World of Warcraft (WoW).

In WoW, the nickname of the player's avatar is constantly hovering above the head of the player so that the identity is visible for everyone else in the game.

Aram took this little feature out of cyberspace to see how it would look if people's names would float above their heads in the physical world too.

WoW has been performed at different locations around the world. Luckily, it is well-documented!


Getting coffee WoW style Workshop in Ghent Project Site

READ ON »


REALIZING THE IMPOSSIBLE: ART AGAINST AUTHORITY


reaimp.jpg

Aesthetics and Politics

REALIZING THE IMPOSSIBLE: ART AGAINST AUTHORITY by Josh MacPhee, Erik Reuland, editors :: There has always been a close relationship between aesthetics and politics in anti-authoritarian social movements. And those movements have in turn influenced many of the last century's most important art movements, including cubism, Dada, post-impressionism, abstract expressionism, surrealism, Fluxus, Situationism, and punk. Today, the movement against corporate globalization, with its creative acts of resistance, has brought anti-authoritarian politics into the forefront. This sprawling, inclusive collection explores this vibrant history, with topics ranging from turn-of-the-century French cartoonists to modern Indonesian printmaking, from people rolling giant balls of trash down Chicago streets to massive squatted urban villages and renegade playgrounds in Denmark, from stencil artists of Argentina to radical video collectives of the US and Mexico. Lots of illustrations, all b&w.;

READ ON »



Discussions (102) Opportunities (7) Events (39) Jobs (2)
DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Sociology of the Fading Signal--Can You Hear Me Now?


i didn't mean to indicate that totalitarian religious orders are not a problem - i too have lived in the bible belt - North Carolina and now Southern Missouri - so i see the effects of this, and i know that my relationship to an acedemic community (where there is a healthy dose scepticism about religious dogma) has refocused my views of these things. The thing that I find most interesting in terms of criticism in my professional/social group is the fact that many acedemics will talk endlessly about the "ideology" of christianity, and yet not even recognize the dogma of "Technological Progress". Perhaps, Technophilia should be a term used more often and added to the key words list on Rhizome for that matter - i think technophobia is already on there. hmmmm.

JM Haefner wrote:

> On Thursday, November 20, 2003, at 04:17 PM, mark cooley wrote:
>
> > you could say that insofar as we place almost total faith in
> something
> > (technology) that we see as existing outside of ourselves but is
> > actually our own invention.
>
> so is god
>
> > i see it as this, but differing from religion in that we see
> > technology as always evolving (and taking us with it) toward some
> > higher state of existence rather than as a static order of things
> > (religion).
>
> apparently people think god lives...therefore evolves
>
> > in this way perhaps the rhetoric around technology is even more
> > disturbing than religious rhetoric because it allows for the
> infinite
> > expansion of capital.
>
> you should live in the bible belt...they fight about whether THEY are
> the buckle of the belt
>
> > it is interesting to see the debates around biotechnology for
> instance
> > - many oppositional arguments focus on biotech disturbing god's
> plan,
> > whereas many scientific arguments for biotech center on a (supposed
> > natural) progression of human's control (through technology of
> course)
> > of nature.
>
> the Hubble telescope has or should have upset many ideas about where
> we
> stand in the universe
>
> > both are essentialist positions but i am wondering which is better
> or
> > worse - in terms of reproducing the ideology of capitalism.
> hmmmmm?
>
> money is god's reward
>
> Coming soon:
> Art about the above, or
> the KKK, or
> the government.
>
> -=j
>

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Re: Sociology of the Fading Signal--Can You Hear Me Now?


you could say that insofar as we place almost total faith in something (technology) that we see as existing outside of ourselves but is actually our own invention. i see it as this, but differing from religion in that we see technology as always evolving (and taking us with it) toward some higher state of existence rather than as a static order of things (religion). in this way perhaps the rhetoric around technology is even more disturbing than religious rhetoric because it allows for the infinite expansion of capital. it is interesting to see the debates around biotechnology for instance - many oppositional arguments focus on biotech disturbing god's plan, whereas many scientific arguments for biotech center on a (supposed natural) progression of human's control (through technology of course) of nature. both are essentialist positions but i am wondering which is better or worse - in terms of reproducing the ideology of capitalism. hmmmmm?

JM Haefner wrote:

> and so too...technology is the new opiate of the masses...
>
> -=j
>
>
> On Thursday, November 20, 2003, at 10:35 AM, mark cooley wrote:
>
> > perhaps implicit within this discussion, but i don't think touched
> > upon directly yet, is the discussion of technology and alienation in
> a
> > marxist sense. capitalist political economy (with which we
> > participate) demands that we (the professional/political classes at
> > least) be multipresent. because by nature the body cannot be
> located
> > in several locations at once (without decapitation at least). we
> > substitute our presence with technology (perhaps there could be a
> > discussion here on technology as fetish). What happens with
> > loss/disturbance of signal is a concrete reminder of our lack of
> > presence. unfortunately, rather than questioning a
> political/economic
> > system that puts our bodies into a position of inferiority to
> > technology and subservant to a naturalized social order of
> increasing
> > alienation, many instead blame it on the technology - we displace
> our
> > anxiety about our alienation by buying the next big promise of
> > "connection" which again reenforces our alienation. This di!
> > scussion could involve a more direct reference to the rhetoric of
> the
> > telecommunications industry. There are many television ads that
> come
> > to mind which are meant to sooth consumers into choosing the latest
> > telecommunication devices over choosing the presence of body - this
> > becomes a moral choice. In the case of an ad depicting a parent at
> an
> > airport (obviously traveling for business) calling in to her/his
> > child's gradeschool play and listening over the cell, later
> declaring
> > to the child that (s)he didn't in fact miss the performance -
> thanks
> > to the trusty cell phone. Another, more recent ad, goes much
> further.
> > there's a father, again at an airport on business, talking to his
> > daughter who is sitting beside him. someone walks by obscuring our
> > view of the father for an instant and when we can see him again it
> is
> > revealed that he is actually speaking to his daughter on his cell.
> > Obviously, underlying these ads, is the moral assumption that
> parental
> > presence is necessary (wh!
> > ich most would agree with), but the political/economic structures
> that
> > alienate parent from child are completely naturalized. The
> realities
> > of global capital cannot be questioned in such a way that is
> > threatening to capital and so thanks to global capital (information
> > networks) a parent's cellular presense is just as good as the real
> > thing.
> >
> > i have to stop writing because i have to go to work... or maybe
> i'll
> > just call in and tell the bosses and students that my telepresence
> is
> > just as good as the real thing.
> >
> > Sean Capone wrote:
> >
> >> more (this got accidentally posted under the heading The XTC of
> >> Communication) :
> >>
> >> 1) Total Information Loss (TIL) part II: if a signal is basically
> >> information, then the types of data we store on our portable
> devices
> >> (phone books, day planners, alarms, location technologies, email
> etc)
> >> ensures the probability of their use. Remember when we used to
> carry
> >> around little phone books of our friends and relatives contact
> >> information? Can you even remember anyone's phone # these days
> besides
> >> your own?
> >> Bearers of information must have the security of potentiality. Back
> up
> >> your address books, kids.
> >>
> >> 2) Inadvertant social experiment in action: today as I was playing
> >> phone-and-email monkey-in-the-middle while trying to meet a
> client's
> >> deadline, the project mgr's phone rudely switched off its voice
> >> capabilities while commuting; for the next hour I was subject to
> >> flurries of email & text messages being sent from his phone to the
> >> phone of an on-site colleague, who would vocally relay his
> managerial
> >> anxieties. His only role was to provide a front end filter to the
> >> client, the subterfuge of which became increasingly complex in an
> >> almost sitcom way as the emails, txt msgs, and phone calls
> >> exponentially crossed and misfired.
> >>
> >> 3) Off topic for a minute, I can understand the design convergence
> of
> >> aerodynamically engineered cars and shoes, but why make cell phones
> >> look like that too? I suspect that they play off deeply coded
> cultural
> >> signifiers of speed & mobility.
> >>
> >> 4) More references: "I'm Losing You" by Bruce Wagner (the title
> refers
> >> to the utterance said during imminent signal loss on cells, but of
> >> course has deeper symbolic meaning--read the book!); also, Ghost in
> >> the Shell graphic novels. Side by side, at their core, these are
> two
> >> very different and beautiful examinations of spirituality and human
> >> value as mediated by telecommunications & signal interference.
> >>
> >> 5) Music: Scanner, Oval, PreFuse 73; we have to consider the
> aesthetic
> >> of hiphop, cliqhop, and IDM-- musical forms which are ecstatic over
> >> the corrupt or fragmented signal information in a transmission
> medium
> >> (scratches, pops, CD clicks, phonetic deconstruction). Evocation of
> >> nostalgia through the act of disappearing.
> >>
> >> 6) I ran some of these ideas by the proprietor of a gallery space
> and
> >> plan on revising these ideas into a formal curatorial thesis.
> Please
> >> drop any suggestions my way about artists who are working in any
> >> medium that addresses the physical, visual, technological, or
> >> metaphorical social spaces engendered by the anxiety--or relief--
> of
> >> signal disappearance.
> >>
> >> 7) How could I forget-- Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino. A most
> >> wonderful book which, aside from its many complex themes and
> morals,
> >> explores how the clarity of communication--the gradual learning of
> a
> >> language-- hinders the free association and imagination of more
> >> symbolic means of story-telling.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> > +
> > -> post: list@rhizome.org
> > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> > -> subscribe/unsubscribe:
> http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> > -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
> > +
> > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> > Membership Agreement available online at
> http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
>

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Sociology of the Fading Signal--Can You Hear Me Now?


perhaps implicit within this discussion, but i don't think touched upon directly yet, is the discussion of technology and alienation in a marxist sense. capitalist political economy (with which we participate) demands that we (the professional/political classes at least) be multipresent. because by nature the body cannot be located in several locations at once (without decapitation at least). we substitute our presence with technology (perhaps there could be a discussion here on technology as fetish). What happens with loss/disturbance of signal is a concrete reminder of our lack of presence. unfortunately, rather than questioning a political/economic system that puts our bodies into a position of inferiority to technology and subservant to a naturalized social order of increasing alienation, many instead blame it on the technology - we displace our anxiety about our alienation by buying the next big promise of "connection" which again reenforces our alienation. This discussion could involve a more direct reference to the rhetoric of the telecommunications industry. There are many television ads that come to mind which are meant to sooth consumers into choosing the latest telecommunication devices over choosing the presence of body - this becomes a moral choice. In the case of an ad depicting a parent at an airport (obviously traveling for business) calling in to her/his child's gradeschool play and listening over the cell, later declaring to the child that (s)he didn't in fact miss the performance - thanks to the trusty cell phone. Another, more recent ad, goes much further. there's a father, again at an airport on business, talking to his daughter who is sitting beside him. someone walks by obscuring our view of the father for an instant and when we can see him again it is revealed that he is actually speaking to his daughter on his cell. Obviously, underlying these ads, is the moral assumption that parental presence is necessary (which most would agree with), but the political/economic structures that alienate parent from child are completely naturalized. The realities of global capital cannot be questioned in such a way that is threatening to capital and so thanks to global capital (information networks) a parent's cellular presense is just as good as the real thing.

i have to stop writing because i have to go to work... or maybe i'll just call in and tell the bosses and students that my telepresence is just as good as the real thing.

Sean Capone wrote:

> more (this got accidentally posted under the heading The XTC of
> Communication) :
>
> 1) Total Information Loss (TIL) part II: if a signal is basically
> information, then the types of data we store on our portable devices
> (phone books, day planners, alarms, location technologies, email etc)
> ensures the probability of their use. Remember when we used to carry
> around little phone books of our friends and relatives contact
> information? Can you even remember anyone's phone # these days besides
> your own?
> Bearers of information must have the security of potentiality. Back up
> your address books, kids.
>
> 2) Inadvertant social experiment in action: today as I was playing
> phone-and-email monkey-in-the-middle while trying to meet a client's
> deadline, the project mgr's phone rudely switched off its voice
> capabilities while commuting; for the next hour I was subject to
> flurries of email & text messages being sent from his phone to the
> phone of an on-site colleague, who would vocally relay his managerial
> anxieties. His only role was to provide a front end filter to the
> client, the subterfuge of which became increasingly complex in an
> almost sitcom way as the emails, txt msgs, and phone calls
> exponentially crossed and misfired.
>
> 3) Off topic for a minute, I can understand the design convergence of
> aerodynamically engineered cars and shoes, but why make cell phones
> look like that too? I suspect that they play off deeply coded cultural
> signifiers of speed & mobility.
>
> 4) More references: "I'm Losing You" by Bruce Wagner (the title refers
> to the utterance said during imminent signal loss on cells, but of
> course has deeper symbolic meaning--read the book!); also, Ghost in
> the Shell graphic novels. Side by side, at their core, these are two
> very different and beautiful examinations of spirituality and human
> value as mediated by telecommunications & signal interference.
>
> 5) Music: Scanner, Oval, PreFuse 73; we have to consider the aesthetic
> of hiphop, cliqhop, and IDM-- musical forms which are ecstatic over
> the corrupt or fragmented signal information in a transmission medium
> (scratches, pops, CD clicks, phonetic deconstruction). Evocation of
> nostalgia through the act of disappearing.
>
> 6) I ran some of these ideas by the proprietor of a gallery space and
> plan on revising these ideas into a formal curatorial thesis. Please
> drop any suggestions my way about artists who are working in any
> medium that addresses the physical, visual, technological, or
> metaphorical social spaces engendered by the anxiety--or relief-- of
> signal disappearance.
>
> 7) How could I forget-- Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino. A most
> wonderful book which, aside from its many complex themes and morals,
> explores how the clarity of communication--the gradual learning of a
> language-- hinders the free association and imagination of more
> symbolic means of story-telling.
>
>
>

DISCUSSION

mark cooley: new work on warProductwar


http://www.war-product-war.com

warProductwar is a site for reflection and meditation on U.S. war culture. The project will develop over time as a series of installations through which participant/viewers may re-view cultural representations in possibly revealing (or at least troubling) juxtapositions. Through the course of the project, warproductwar will remain in a state of flux. Broken links and loose ends should be expected. Additions, deletions, and changes are continually pondered and infrequently enacted.

INSTALLATION RECORD

4/03 - The Good, Bad & the Profitable

9/12/03 - Stocks to go Long on, the Death of History & Candy Bombs

11/16/03 - StateSponsoredTerror: participatory list

FAIR USE NOTICE. This site contains copyrighted (im)material. Use of copyrighted (im)material has not been specifically authorized by copyright owners. Previously published content is recontextualized and made available @ war-product-war.com in efforts to promote active re-readings of U.S. visual culture in reference to war, alienation, and the global economy. The function of this site constitutes a 'fair use' of the copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law.

SOFTWARE SPECIFICATIONS. Site tested in internet explorer (other browsers may experience problems). flash player 5 plugin required

a FLAWEDart production http://art-design.smsu.edu/cooley

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Sociology of the Fading Signal--Can You Hear Me Now?


> 6) Why is the loss of email and TV reception met with frustration and near-hysteria

recently, a trip to Best Buy showed me that television antennae are now marketed as back-up systems to cable and other forms of reception (i guess i've been in a tv time warp). i was buying the thing as my only form of tv reception. it is interesting and sort of sad to think that people would be so upset at the thought of their cable cutting out in the middle of a show that they would actually go out and buy a back-up system.

this is an interesting research topic - sean's not mine.

Eryk Salvaggio wrote:

>
>
> These are some great points. I like that you look at signal abscence
> vs the
> signal overwhelmed by noise. Is there a "drop to signal" ratio rating
> on par
> with "signal to noise?" Dropped signal may have its broader meanings
> as
> well.
>
> There's a Rufus Wainwright song called "Vibrate" that has a line I
> think is
> pretty clever:
>
> My phone's on vibrate for you
> But still I never ever feel from you
>
> I personally feel like apologizing for the signal breakup actually
> stems
> from some embarrassment that comes from owning a cell phone in the
> first
> place. I am landline-locked, and that is how I always take my friends
> apologies- "Oh, look at you with your landline, and me, with my frilly
> convinience and its making us unable to communicate." In my circle of
> friends the cell phone was always a symbol of yuppie indulgence- and
> then
> overconsumption in general. And then, everyone bought one. When you
> talk to
> a landline on a crappy cell phone, there is responsibility for the
> breakup
> of the conversation.
>
> -e.
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Sean Capone" <sean@mvmt.us>
> To: <list@rhizome.org>
> Sent: Saturday, November 08, 2003 2:57 PM
> Subject: RHIZOME_RAW: Sociology of the Fading Signal--Can You Hear Me
> Now?
>
>
> > Hi all. While chatting with a friend in SF from my location in
> Chicago,
> his signal suddenly died. While the implications of mobility and
> nomadic
> enabling telecommunications has been written about quite a bit, I am
> interested if anyone has conducted any artistic or anthropological
> research
> on the telecommunications reality of the Faded Signal. There seem to
> be some
> implications here on the way in which theses technologies have
> sculpted new
> social landscapes, but in which the glitches inherent in the
> technology are
> taken for granted by the users, whose navigational instincts then
> guide them
> through the anxieties of Sudden Potential or Actual Communication
> Loss. I
> mean it seems obvious, but I think that's only because we have so
> seamlessly
> adopted (adapted) our habits around the inevitability of the Glitch.
> >
> > Some quick scattered thoughts:
> >
> > 1) Can Total Information Loss provide comfort in a paranoid age of
> Total
> Information Awareness?
> >
> > 2) Episode of Friends: Phoebe fakes her way out of a phone
> conversation by
> pretending that she was on a mobile and 'just about to go into a
> tunnel---(makes static noise with mouth)--OK bye now!'. A good comic
> bit,
> but also a riff on the social phenomena (batteries dying, signal
> cutout,
> needing two hands to do something) of deceit which is enabled by
> taking the
> Glitch for granted.
> >
> > 3) Is anyone else struck by the sadness of the "Can You Hear Me Now"
> guy--a rootless lonely cell-phone ronin endlessly repeating his mantra
> to
> the electronic void...
> >
> > 4) Business etiquette as practiced by international executives has
> the
> severity and rigidity of bushido. I wonder what mannerisms and
> professional
> attitudes of conducting business have emerged as a result of having a
> potential signal loss wiping out a delicate deal-in-progress. What
> ethnic
> and cultural biases come into play as different countries'
> incompatible cell
> networks and methods of social protocol compete?
> >
> > 5) STD-ISD: You will never get lost in India no matter what--it is
> THE
> most wired nation in the world. I was impressed that literally
> everywhere,
> on practically every street corner, were booths that allowed one to
> make
> cheap, clear, and fast phone calls to anywhere in the world. To say
> nothing
> of the frenzy of the (now increasingly regulated) cell industry out
> there. A
> sane response to an otherwise glitchy and congested society.
> >
> > 6) Why is the loss of email and TV reception met with frustration
> and
> near-hysteria, but cell phone signal loss is met with, at best, mild
> aggravation and more often than not, if you think about it, mild
> relief at
> the outside interruption of what was a (good but) banal conversation?
> What
> are the statistics on resuming conversations following a signal loss?
> What
> does this say about the flexibility of our habituations?
> >
> > 7) Everyone experiences 'dead zone' areas in cities--certain places
> that
> are clearly delineated-- where one's cell simply will not get a
> signal.
> These electromagnetic topographical black holes create anxieties once
> encountered and perhaps permanently alter one's desire to return to
> the area
> or skirt the virtual perimeter. But at the same time they offer zones
> of
> retreat and reflection, a telecommunication Zen garden deep within the
> city's canyons.
> >
> > 7a) In other words, these 'Dead zones' produce yet another
> psychogeography
> overlaid on the several we carry already navigating our urban
> habitations,
> but rather than a social or technological map, it is one of neuroses.
> The
> ability to be gotten ahold of at all times creates a neurotic
> condition
> about being out of touch, even if it's just for minutes at a time.
> >
> > 8) Why do we apologize when our signals fade or are crappy? I
> believe this
> is leftover cultural collateral anxiety along the lines of, say,
> choosing a
> crappy car or buying a cheap TV set. Picking an inferior wireless
> provider
> or a cheap phone is, by nature, indicative of a careless or
> insuficient
> identity/personality as manifested through its consumer choices.
> >
> > 9) The potential Loss of the Signal is the perimeter around any new
> works
> or social acts. The new activist phenomena of spontaneous, cell-phone
> motivated organizations and happenings is undermined should there be a
> sudden relay power loss, or should the targets of protest engage in
> the
> counter-practice of picking-or creating- 'dead zones' in which to
> house
> their activities. Or, in terms of art practice, Golan Levin conducted
> a
> cellphone symphony by casting his own frequencies at the audience (is
> this
> correct?), eliminating the need to stage the event in a universally
> receptible location..
> >
> >
> > 10) The Matrix, among other things, creates a world where survival
> depends
> upon clear signals and defined 'exit points' via the Operators. These
> 'real
> people' diving into the Matrix are the metaphorical Initiates
> embodying
> present-day cool 'Wired' individuals-- Infonauts spelunking into
> consumer-zombie society along the lines of privileged demands for free
> and
> instantaneous access to technological communication. Is Neo the
> equivelant
> of the cell-phone yapping, SUV driving Silicon Valley millionaire,
> creating
> the need for science-fiction-like access to technology for a society
> he
> secretly holds in contempt?
> >
> >
> > Feel free to add to this list of observations. Again, while the
> implications of mobile empowerment is interesting, I'm even more
> compelled
> to explore what's happening on the ragged edges and empty spaces--
> >
> > Look around and see how you and others around you seamlessly absorb
> signal
> loss into your daily existence.
> >
> > :sean
> > +
> > -> post: list@rhizome.org
> > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> > -> subscribe/unsubscribe:
> http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> > -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
> > +
> > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> > Membership Agreement available online at
> http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
> >
>