mark cooley
Since 2002
Works in United States of America

PORTFOLIO (9)
BIO
Mark Cooley is an interdisciplinary artist interested in exploring the intersections of art, activism and institutional critique in a variety of contexts. Subjects of particular interest are U.S. foreign policy, corporate culture, and the political economy of new technologies. Recently, Mark has focused his attention on food production and consumption and the ways in which artists may mediate in these processes.

http://www.flawedart.net


The New American Dictionary


The Boston-based performance group Institute for Infinitely Small Things has published a book called The New American Dictionary.

The dictionary highlights the terminology of fear, security and war that has permeated American English post 9-11. It includes 68 new terms i.e. Preparedness and Freedom Fries as well as terms that have recently been redefined i.e. Torture.

The dictionary also has an interactive dimension. 58 terms are left undefined for the reader to pencil in their own definition. Furthermore, readers are invited to submit their additions to the institute for a possible inclusion in the 2nd edition.

The New American Dictionary is available at several online stores.

www.newamericandictionary.com

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exhaust emissions balloons


exhaust_emissions.jpg
a huge balloon, tied to a car�s vent-pipe, depicting the amount of exhaust emissions a car releases a day.

the "bursting earth" project is similar, but more dynamic. activists attach world globe balloons on exhaust pipes of cars in Berlin. the exhaust gas inflates the ballons. after the message becomes readable, there is a big "bang".

[link: frederiksamuel.com & adsoftheworld.com & 20to20.org]

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WoW!


Aram Bartholl is a german artist renowned for making physical abstractions of the digital world, particularly game-worlds.

One of Aram's not-to-be-missed performances is inspired by the popular computer game World of Warcraft (WoW).

In WoW, the nickname of the player's avatar is constantly hovering above the head of the player so that the identity is visible for everyone else in the game.

Aram took this little feature out of cyberspace to see how it would look if people's names would float above their heads in the physical world too.

WoW has been performed at different locations around the world. Luckily, it is well-documented!


Getting coffee WoW style Workshop in Ghent Project Site

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REALIZING THE IMPOSSIBLE: ART AGAINST AUTHORITY


reaimp.jpg

Aesthetics and Politics

REALIZING THE IMPOSSIBLE: ART AGAINST AUTHORITY by Josh MacPhee, Erik Reuland, editors :: There has always been a close relationship between aesthetics and politics in anti-authoritarian social movements. And those movements have in turn influenced many of the last century's most important art movements, including cubism, Dada, post-impressionism, abstract expressionism, surrealism, Fluxus, Situationism, and punk. Today, the movement against corporate globalization, with its creative acts of resistance, has brought anti-authoritarian politics into the forefront. This sprawling, inclusive collection explores this vibrant history, with topics ranging from turn-of-the-century French cartoonists to modern Indonesian printmaking, from people rolling giant balls of trash down Chicago streets to massive squatted urban villages and renegade playgrounds in Denmark, from stencil artists of Argentina to radical video collectives of the US and Mexico. Lots of illustrations, all b&w.;

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Discussions (102) Opportunities (7) Events (39) Jobs (2)
DISCUSSION

Re: Re: what exactly IS new media?


Sean Capone wrote:

> Plasma Studii writes:
>
> >> we are now in silverism, which will be followed by shiny
> silverism.
>
> Sorry mate, silverism peaked in the 80s already. New media is
> 'post-Silver Age':
>
> http://www.moma.org/education/openends/guide/overview/12koons.html
>
>

maybe we are in the "skins" age, but even that is quickly passing. we should be in the bronze age.

DISCUSSION

Re: what exactly IS new media?


Plasma Studii wrote:

> help me/us all out here if anyone knows more.
>
> been confused for over a decade until today. but as far as i can
> tell, "new media" means the equipment is available in metallic but
> not chrome. it's easy to be mislead when everybody says it like we
> all know, but probably nobody really does and they're just
> pretending. don't sweat it.
>
> for instance, a toaster is available in metallic, but it is chrome,
> so it is clearly NOT "new media". digital cameras and hand-held
> camcorders usually come in brushed metal or titanium, so obviously,
> they do qualify. even cell phones that are equipped with cameras are
> generally silver, but never chrome. the term is misleading. you'd
> be right in thinking video and photos really ARE old technology,
> based on inventions that have been around for 100+ years . the
> "digital" stuff is actually far, far lower resolution and far, far
> higher priced than the analog predecessors. but this equipment was,
> for years, always heavy and painted black. not interesting. only
> recently did everything become exciting when it got a shiny new
> casing.
>
> the real tricky part to making the extra conceptual leap that the
> phrase "new media" essentially indicates potential retail mark-up
> value. every era in art has its name. after impressionism, abstract
> impressionism, modernism, and post-modernism, we are now in
> silverism, which will be followed by shiny silverism. the term "new
> media" will be considered obsolete and un-hip, in favor of "new new
> media", meaning "shinier than ever".
> --
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
> PLASMA STUDII
> art non-profit
> stages * galleries * the web
> PO Box 1086
> Cathedral Station
> New York, USA 10025
>
> (on-line press kit)
> http://plasmastudii.org

i think you hit on something that makes me uncomfortable about the term and practice (for after all names of things are important insofar as they reflect attitudes and practice) of "new media". while much of the art produced under the title of new media (whether given that title by artist of institution) clearly questions modernist assumptions about art i.e. its supposed autonomy from politics, class, cultural biases etc. also, the modernist constructed hiarchy and assumed autonomy of media (as in Medium) are questioned: it is also true that New Media is much more dependent and quiet often a conscious byproduct of new dominant technologies, sometimes working as a lubricant to make new technologies hipper and more appealing to those who like to feel that they are not bound by corporate interests because they make art with their cell phone. anyway, subversion, i believe, is still possible. detournement is still possible. or is it? artists can still subvert the intentional uses of new technologies and claim to not be a corporate whore, can't we? or is ambivolance the right attitude (yes i am part of the problem, yet still i resist and work to reveal the problems that bright and shiney new technologies/media work to make invisible.

it seems that New Media takes from modernism in that more emphasis is placed on the medium (a thing that picks up the voices of the spirit world and deciphers them for the average (yet initiated) person. with all the criticism that came out of so-called postmodernism - the critique of the modernist assumption of the artist genius, the supposed autonomy of Art etc. it seems that another term would have been chosen to express what is going on with visual culture at the moment. with New Media it seems the previous faith in the artist genius has been passed on to blind faith in media itself. with all the problems with modernist philosophy it still took an artist to transform house paint into a Medium - now, it seems, it takes a new media(medium) to make a person an artist.

.but i don't know - just some thoughts.

DISCUSSION

Fwd: convocatoria / invitation


Begin forwarded message:

> From: "New Geographies Project" <map@betabelle.org>
> Date: April 25, 2005 11:10:07 PM CDT
> To: rain@betabelle.org
> Subject: convocatoria / invitation
> Reply-To: map@betabelle.org
>
> ESPANOL:
>
> ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
>
> // Proyecto Nuevas Geografias > http://www.laberintos.org
>
>> laberintos.org, en colaboracion con betabelle.org, convoca a artistas
> interesados en el arte de la red y nuevos medios a participar en la
> generacion
> de propuestas de trabajo en linea que reflexionen, mediten y analicen=

> la
> problematica y definicion de las nuevas geografias, entendidas esta=
s
> como las
> relaciones que se generan a partir de una sociedad globalizada
> (movilidad,
> espacio, territorio, geografias emergentes, ubicuidad, temporalidad,
> fronteras,
> multitudes conectadas).
>
> criterios de participacion:
>
> 1 > obra inedita producida en 2005, en formato .gif, .jpg, .swf, .mov,=

> .mpeg, .dir,
> .html, etc.
>
> 2 > dos modalidades:
> a) la obra puede estar alojada en el sitio del artista (sin limite de=

> tamano).
> b) ser alojada en nuestro servidor, (si se instala en laberintos la
> obra no debera
> rebasar los 500 kb.)
>
> 3 > cada artista puede participar hasta con 3 obras.
>
> 4 > tema central: nuevas geografias (movilidad, espacio, territorio,
> geografias
> emergentes, ubicuidad, temporalidad, fronteras, multitudes conectadas)
>
> 5 > las obras seleccionadas formaran parte del proyecto durante 2005 -=

> 2006.
>
> 6 > envio de propuestas a nuestra direccion de contacto:
> info@laberintos.com.mx, especificando nombre de artista(s), nombre de
> la
> obra, link, fecha de realizacion, pais de origen.
>
> 7 > los participantes seleccionados pueden cancelar su participacion
> en el
> momento que asi lo dispongan.
>
> 8 > no hay fecha limite.
>
>
>
> ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
>
>
> ENGLISH:
>
>
> // New Geographies Project > http://www.laberintos.org
>
>> laberintos.org, in collaboration with betabelle.org, it summons to
>> artists who
> are interested in web art, they can participate in the generation of
> on-line work
> proposals that reflect, meditate and analyze the problems and
> definition of new
> geographies. those new geographies are understood as relations
> generated
> from a globalized society (mobility, space, territory, emergent
> geographies,
> ubiquity, temporality, frontiers, and connected crowds).
>
> participation criteria:
>
> 1> unpublished work, produced on 2005, format: .gif, .jpg, .swf, .mov,
> .mpeg, .dir,
> .html, etc.
>
> 2 >there are two modalities:
> a) the work can be hosted in the artist's site (without limit of size).
> b) It could be hosted in our server, (if it is installed in
> laberintos.org, the work
> must be smaller than 500 kb).
>
> 3 > each artist can participate with up to 3 works.
>
> 4 > main topic: new geographies (mobility, space, territory, emergent
> geographies, ubiquity, temporality, frontiers, connected crowds)
>
> 5 > selected works will be part of the project during 2005 - 2006.
>
> 6 > you can send your proposals to our contact e-mail:
> info@laberintos.com.mx.
> please specify: name(s) of artist(s), name of work, link, date of
> production,
> country of origin.
>
> 7 > participants selected can cancel their participation whenever they
> want.
>
> 8 > there is not a deadline.
>
>
mark cooley
assistant professor
art and design department
mgc868f@smsu.edu
office 9a, art annex
# 417.866.8839
http://art-design.smsu.edu/cooley

DISCUSSION

Tommy Franks teaches elementary school


>
>
>
> DEMONSTRATORS BLOCK CAR OF GEN. TOMMY FRANKS;
> LOS ANGELES SCHOOL IS SITE OF DRAMATIC CONFRONTATION
>

DISCUSSION

Fwd: Auction huge success; prosecution intensifies


Begin forwarded message:

> From: CAE Defense Fund <auctionpr@caedefensefund.org>
> Date: April 20, 2005 7:34:11 PM CDT
> To: "mgc868f-smsu.edu" <mgc868f@smsu.edu>
> Subject: Auction huge success; prosecution intensifies
>
> Your profile:
> http://rtmark.com/caedefense/dblist/prof.php?
> e=mgc868f@smsu.edu&x=795797738
>
> April 21, 2005
> FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
>
> Contact: mailto:media@caedefensefund.org
>
> AUCTION TO BENEFIT CAE DEFENSE FUND IS OVERWHELMING SUCCESS
> Government intensifies investigation
>
> On Sunday April 17, an art auction to benefit the CAE Defense Fund
> raised $167,700. The auction, held at Paula Cooper Gallery in New York
> City, featured over fifty artists who donated their work to the cause.
>
> The amount raised was over three times more than had been raised (and
> spent) in the eleven months preceding the auction. Still, two to three
> times as much may be needed to successfully defend Steve Kurtz, a
> founding member of Critical Art Ensemble (CAE) and Professor of Art at
> the University of Buffalo, and Robert Ferrell, a Professor of Human
> Genetics at the University of Pittsburgh, throughout the entire trial
> process.
>
> While the auction's success demonstrates the growing support for CAE,
> the ordeal grinds on as the prosecution vigorously pursues its "case"
> and the FBI continues to expand its costly investigation against the
> artists' collective. Two days after the fundraiser, Steven Barnes,
> another founding member of the CAE, appeared before a federal grand
> jury in response to a subpoena which indicates that the Justice
> Department is again seeking charges under Section 175 of the US
> Biological Weapons Anti-Terrorism Act of 1989, as expanded by the USA
> PATRIOT Act. Under advice of his attorney, Barnes is unable to speak
> about the grand jury hearing itself.
>
> The benefit auction at Paula Cooper Gallery saw hundreds of people
> stream through the gallery all day. The event culminated with a live
> auction hosted by writer/actor Wallace Shawn. In his opening remarks,
> Shawn spoke against complacency and apathy during these very dangerous
> times. Steve Kurtz, who attended the auction, was unable to speak
> directly about the case under advice of council. He graciously thanked
> the crowd, obviously moved by this strong show of support.
>
> Artists who donated their works to the auction included: Acconci
> Studio, Dennis Adams, Carl Andre, The Atlas Group, Nayland Blake, Mel
> Bochner, Cecily Brown, Chris Burden, Paul Chan, Jeremy Deller, Mark
> Dion, Sam Durant, Tony Feher, Andrea Fraser, Joseph Grigely, Hans
> Haacke, Ann Hamilton, Rachel Harrison, Emily Jacir, Mike Kelley, Mary
> Kelly, Barbara Kruger, William Pope L., Louise Lawler, Zoe Leonard,
> Sol LeWitt, Glenn Ligon, Sharon Lockhart, Brice Marden, Allan
> McCollum, Julie Mehretu, Arnold Mesches, Donald Moffett, Dave Muller,
> Vik Muniz, Takashi Murakami, Yoshitomo Nara, Cathy Opie, Ruben Ortiz
> Torres, Laura Owens, David Reed, Alexis Rockman, Martha Rosler,
> Christy Rupp, Carolee Schneemann, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Amy
> Sillman, Lorna Simpson, Kiki Smith, Janaina Tschape, and many more.
>
> To view some of the donated artwork, please visit:
> http://caedefensefund.org/caedefensefundauction.html
>
> For more information on Steve Kurtz's case, please visit
> http://caedefensefund.org
>
> Press inquiries may be directed to mailto:media@caedefensefund.org
>
>
>
mark cooley
assistant professor
art and design department
mgc868f@smsu.edu
office 9a, art annex
# 417.866.8839
http://art-design.smsu.edu/cooley