Marisa Olson
Since the beginning
Works in Brooklyn, New York United States of America

PORTFOLIO (10)
BIO
Marisa Olson is an artist, writer, and media theorist. Her interdisciplinary work has been exhibited at the Venice Biennale, Centre Pompidou, Tate(s) Modern + Liverpool, the Nam June Paik Art Center, British Film Institute, Sundance Film Festival, PERFORMA Biennial; commissioned and collected by the Whitney Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Houston Center for Photography, Experimental Television Center, and PS122; and reviewed in Artforum, Art21, the NY Times, Liberation, Folha de Sao Paolo, the Village Voice, and elsewhere.

Olson has served as Editor & Curator at Rhizome, the inaugural curator at Zero1, and Associate Director at SF Camerawork. She's contributed to many major journals & books and this year Cocom Press published Arte Postinternet, a Spanish translation of her texts on Postinternet Art, a movement she framed in 2006. In 2015 LINK Editions will publish a retrospective anthology of over a decade of her writings on contemporary art which have helped establish a vocabulary for the criticism of new media. Meanwhile, she has also curated programs at the Guggenheim, New Museum, SFMOMA, White Columns, Artists Space, and Bitforms Gallery. She has served on Advisory Boards for Ars Electronica, Transmediale, ISEA, the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences, Creative Capital, the Getty Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Kennedy Center, and the Tribeca Film Festival.

Olson studied Fine Art at Goldsmiths, History of Consciousness at UC Santa Cruz, and Rhetoric & Film Studies at UC Berkeley. She has recently been a visiting artist at Yale, SAIC, Oberlin, and VCU; a Visiting Critic at Brown; and Visiting Faculty at Bard College's Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts and Ox-Bow. She previously taught at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts' new media graduate program (ITP) and was Assistant Professor of New Media at SUNY-Purchase's School of Film & Media Studies. She was recently an Artist-in-Residence at Eyebeam & is currently Visiting Critic at RISD.

booomerrranganggboobooomerranrang: Nancy Holt's networked video


Nancy Holt, Boomerang (1974), still from video.

In her time on this planet, Nancy Holt came to be known as a great American Land Artist, and certainly her brilliant installations, like Utah's Sun Tunnels and collaborations with her partner Robert Smithson and their peers, are profoundly significant, but it was her work in film & video that has had the greatest personal impact on me.

I somehow didn't see Boomerang, her 1974 video performance usually credited to her collaborator Richard Serra, until I was a Ph.D. student in Linda Williams's Phenomenology of Film seminar at UC Berkeley's Rhetoric program, but the time delay was more than made up for by the work's formative resonance. In the video, made during Serra's residency at a Texas television station, a young Holt is seen sitting in an anchor's chair before a staid blue background. Despite brief station ID graphic overlays and one minute of silence in the midst of the ten-minute piece (announced as audio trouble and reminding viewers of the work's live TV origin), the work is in many ways sound-centric.


Sound and Image in Electronic Harmony


semiconductor_nanowebbers.jpg
Image: Semiconductor: Ruth Jarman and Joseph Gerhardt, 200 Nanowebbers, 2005

On Saturday, April 11th, New York's School of Visual Arts will co-present the 2009 Visual Music Marathon with the New York Digital Salon and Northeastern University. Promising genre-bending work from fifteen countries, the lineup crams 120 works by new media artists and digital composers into 12 hours. If it's true, as is often said, that MTV killed the attention spans of Generations X and Y, this six-minute-per-piece average ought to suit most festivalgoers' minds, and the resultant shuffling on and off stage will surely be a spectacle in its own rite. In all seriousness, this annual event is a highlight of New York's already thriving electronic music scene and promises many a treat for your eyes and ears. The illustrious organizers behind the marathon know their visual music history and want to remind readers that, "The roots of the genre date back more than two hundred years to the ocular harpsichords and color-music scales of the 18th century," and "the current art form came to fruition following the emergence of film and video in the 20th century." The remarkable ten dozen artists participating in this one-day event will bring us work incorporating such diverse materials as hand-processed film, algorithmically-generated video, visual interpretations of music, and some good old fashioned music-music. From luminaries like Oskar Fischinger, Hans Richter, and Steina Vasulka to emerging artists Joe Tekippe and Chiaki Watanabe, the program will be another star on the map that claims NYC as fertile territory for sonic exploration. - Marisa Olson

READ ON »


Tagalicious


Picture-1.jpg

The National Museum of Contemporary Art (EMST) in Athens, Greece, has committed itself to curating a number of recent exhibitions of internet art. Their current show, "Tag Ties and Affective Spies," features contributions from both net vets and emerging surfers, including Christophe Bruno, Gregory Chatonsky, Paolo Cirio, JODI, Jonathan Harris and Sep Kamvar, Les Liens Invisibles, Personal Cinema and The Erasers, Ramsay Stirling, and Wayne Clements. The online exhibition takes an antagonistic approach to Web 2.0, citing a constant balance "between order and chaos, democracy and adhocracy." Curator Daphne Dragona raises the question of whether the social web is a preexisting platform on which people connect, or whether it is indeed constructed in the act of uploading, tagging, and disclosing previously private information about ourselves on sites like Flickr, YouTube, and Facebook. Dragona asks whether we are truly connecting and interacting, or merely broadcasting. While her curatorial statement doesn't address the issue directly, the show's title hints at the level of self-surveillance in play on these sites. Accordingly, many of the selected works take a critical, if not DIY, approach to the internet. The collective Les Liens Invisibles tends to create works that make an ironic mash-up of the often divergent mantras of tactical media, culture jamming, surrealism, and situationism. In their Subvertr, they encourage Flickr users to "subverTag" their posted images, creating an intentional disassociation between an image's content and its interpretion, with the aim of "breaking the strict rules of significance that characterize the mainstream collective imaginary..." JODI's work, Del.icio.us/ winning information (2008) exploits the limited stylistic parameters of the social bookmarking site. Using ASCII and Unicode page titles to form visual marks, a cryptic tag vocabulary, and a recursive taxonomy, their fun-to-follow site critiques the broader content of the web ...

READ ON »


Reappearance of the Undead


agatha_appears_lialina.gif

In 1997, internet art hall-of-famer Olia Lialina made a "net drama" called Agatha Appears that was written for Netscape 3 and 4 in HTML 3.2. One of the main features of the interactive narrative was the travel of the eponymous avatar across the internet. Let's just say the girl got around. But the magical illusion of the piece was that she appeared to stay still, even when links in the narrative were clicked and the viewer's address bar indicated movement to another server. But in time, both the browser and code in which the story was written became defunct and the piece unraveled as the sites previously hosting the links and files upon which Agatha was dependent disappeared or cleaned house. Such a scenario is common to early internet art (and will no doubt continue to plague the field), as ours is an upgrade culture constantly driving towards new tools, platforms, and codes. Many have debated whether to let older works whither or how it might be possible to update these works, making them compatible with new systems. For those who are interested, some of the best research on the subject has been performed by the folks affiliated with the Variable Media Initiative. Meanwhile, luddites and neophiles alike are now in luck because Agatha Appears has just undergone rejuvenation. Ela Wysocka, a restorer working at Budapest's Center for Culture & Communication Foundation has worked to overcome the sound problems, code incompatibilities, and file corruption and disappearance issues, and she's written a fascinating report about the process, here. And new collaborating hosts have jumped in line to bring the piece back to life, so that like a black and white boyfriend coming home from war, Agatha now offers us a shiny new webring as a token of ...

READ ON »


In the Future-Past Tense



The fantasy of the future and the utopian promises of new technologies have always gone hand-in-hand. If the history of technology's evolution tells the story of our culture, we can also trace our present-day novelties back to the root of our anxieties about the future and the problems these devices hoped to solve. With this correlation in mind, the interactive DVD novel The Imaginary 20th Century (2007) by Norman Klein, Margo Bistis, and Andreas Kratky, jumps back to the fin de siècle era between the 19th and 20th centuries. It was a time of wonder when new technologies and their representation were wedded in documents like panoramic films of public light shows and short actualities about newfangled transportation devices called roller skates. The novel tells the story of "the Chicago World's Fair in 1893, and the story of a woman (Carrie), who in 1901, selects four men to seduce her, each with his own version of the new century" in a recombinatory visual narrative that overlaps 2,200 images culled from primary documents, architectural plans, photos, and other ephemera with an original score. The project speaks to the multiplicity of visions circulating about what the new century would hold, and it's an even more past-tense follow-up to Norman Klein's interactive novel, Bleeding Through: Layers of Los Angeles, 1920-1986 (2003). Klein's work has clearly resonated with at least eleven people, because closing this week at Otis College of Art and Design's Ben Maltz Gallery is "The Future Imaginary," an exhibition that responds to The Imaginary 20th Century with the work of artists Deborah Aschheim, Jeff Cain, Tom Jennings, Jon Kessler, Ed Osborn, Lea Rekow, Douglas Repetto, Phil Ross, Kari Rae Seekins and Aaron Drake, and Susan Simpson. Each contribution embodies the special genre of ...

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Discussions (281) Opportunities (10) Events (4) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

ID/ENTITY @ SF Camerawork


February 18 - March 22, 2003
ID/ENTITY: PORTRAITURE IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Curated by Marisa S. Olson & Christina Yang

This exhibition features a range of media art projects exploring how
artistic representations of "self" change with new technological
advantages. Taking queues from the history of photography, these
investigations look back at traditional portraiture and forward to
the future, tracing the effects of new technologies on the
genre--formally and with regard to cultural shifts in interpretation.

Artists: JD Beltran with Todd Kushnir, Jim Campbell, Paul Kaiser,
with Merce Cunningham, Marc Downie, and Shelley Eshkar, Joan Logue,
Julia Scher, Surveillance Camera Players.

**Collaborative Tele-Presence Exhibit, during Id/Entity's opening reception.
Tuesday, February 18, 5-8 pm

Ken Goldberg, Dez Song, Annamarie Ho, and Anthony Levandowski, of UC
Berkeley, are studying network-based systems that allow groups of
users to "explore" live remote environments such as a rainforest,
biotechnology lab, political rally, or art opening. The "Tele-Actor"
is a skilled human with cameras and microphones connected to a
wireless digital network. Live video and audio are broadcast to
participants via the Internet or interactive television. Participants
not only view, but interact with each other and with the Tele-Actor
by voting on what to do next.

ID/ENTITY was originally organized by MIT / Judith Donath and curated
by Christina Yang, director of media arts at The Kitchen, New York.
Generous support has been offered by the Beall Center for Art &
Technology, University of California, Irvine, and the Exploratorium.

SF Camerawork is a 28 year-old non-profit, artists' organization
whose purpose is to stimulate dialogue, encourage inquiry, and
communicate ideas about contemporary photography and related media
through a variety of artistic and educational programs.

_________________
Marisa S. Olson
Associate Director
SF Camerawork
415. 863. 1001

DISCUSSION

SELF/PROJECTED: The Moving Image As Self Portrait


In conjunction with the exhibition, "ID/ENTITY: Portraiture in the
21st Century," SF Camerawork and Microcinema present...

"SELF/PROJECTED: The Moving Image As Self Portrait"
A screening of short films, curated by Microcinema International and
J.D. Beltran
Tuesday, March 4, 7:30-8:30 pm - theatre opens at 7:00 pm
$6/$4 Camerawork members, students, and seniors
1246 Folsom, San Francisco --- www.sfcamerawork.org

Artists include J.D. Beltran (SF), Louise Bourque (Massachusetts),
Abre Chen (NY), Thorsten Fleisch (Germany), Matthew Gebhardt (NY),
Tina Gonsalves (Australia), Lev (SF), Pascal Lievre (France), Mark
O'Connell (Seattle), Ken Paul Rosenthal (SF), and others.

------------------------------------------------------

also happening @ Camerawork...

SF Camerawork Members' Portfolio Review
Tuesday, February 25, 6-8 pm

Alison Bing, Critic
Courtney Fink, Executive Director, Southern Exposure
Cheryl Haines, Owner, Haines Gallery
Matthew Higgs, Curator, CCAC Wattis Institute, Artforum Contributor
Arnold Kemp, Associate Visual Arts Curtator, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
Lizabeth Oliveria, Owner, Lizabeth Oliveria Gallery

Open to Camerawork Members free of charge. Each participant may
reserve one or two 15-minute reviews with the reviewers. Space is
limited and reservations are accepted on a first come, first served
basis. Please call 415-863-1001 on Saturday, February 15, after 12:00
pm, to make reservations. Reservations will not be taken before this
date and time. Members who have participated in either of the last
two portfolio reviews may not participate.

SF Camerawork is a 28 year-old non-profit, artists' organization
whose purpose is to stimulate dialogue, encourage inquiry, and
communicate ideas about contemporary photography and related
technologies through a variety of artistic and educational programs.
_________________
Marisa S. Olson
Associate Director
SF Camerawork
415. 863. 1001

DISCUSSION

JOB: SFSU, New Media Design


Faculty Position Announcement

Position Title
Tenure Track Appointment in New Media Design

RankAssistant Professor
(Search #80.02)

Qualifications
MFA in Digital Media, Visual Communications, Graphic Design, or
equivalent; or an earned doctorate/or ABD (all but dissertation) in a
related discipline. Previous university level teaching experience
required and professional design experience desirable.

Candidate should have a strong visual design background with
extensive experience in interactive digital media including web
design, interaction design, navigation systems, information
architecture, and usability, etc., as well as an ability to address
historical, social, and theoretical issues of new media. We value
demonstrated experience with real world projects, a diverse range of
design and technical skills, and an experimental approach to this
dynamic field.

Responsibilities
Major teaching responsibilities in interactive digital media courses
for the new Visual Communication emphasis. Courses will span
introductory and advanced topics, studio production skills and
history/theoretical knowledge, undergraduate (BA) and graduate (MA)
courses. This person will play a major role in ongoing development
to translate curriculum and facilities across a changing
technological landscape.

Department
InformationThe Department of Design and Industry (DAI) is one of
six academic units in the College of Creative Arts at San Francisco
State University. DAI offers an MA degree, a Bachelor of Arts degree
with an emphasis in Visual Communication or Product Design, and a
Bachelor of Science Degree in Industrial Technology. There are 600
undergraduates and 70+ graduate students in the department.
Approximately 70% of the undergraduate and 60% of the graduate
students major in Visual Communication. Please visit our web site to
learn more about us at: http://dai.sfsu.edu.

SalaryBased on qualifications.

DeadlineMarch 1, 2003 or until position is filled.

Application Procedure
Send SASE, letter of application, detailed resume, CDROM or URL
containing examples of your work, names and contact information for
three (3) references, and a concise statement (3 pages maximum)
describing your creative design work, approach to teaching, and
research interests for the future. Include examples of student work
under your instruction if available.

ContactJane Veeder, Chair
New Media Search Committee
Department of Design and Industry
San Francisco State University
1600 Holloway Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94132
jveeder@sfsu.edu
(415)338-1547 voice mail
(415)338-7770 fax

San Francisco State University, a member of the California State
University, serves a diverse student body of 27,000 undergraduate and
graduate students. The mission of the university is to promote
scholarship, freedom, human diversity, excellence in instruction, and
intellectual accomplishment. SFSU faculty are expected to be
effective teachers and demonstrate professional achievement and
growth through continued research, publications, and/or creative
activities. San Francisco State University is an Affirmative
Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

_________________
Marisa S. Olson
Associate Director
SF Camerawork
415. 863. 1001

DISCUSSION

reactive art @ sfmoma--reminder


a reminder.....

REACTIVE ART IS NOTHING WITHOUT YOU

Works by Jim Campbell, Scott Snibbe, and Crevice

Conversation with the Artists and Designer Bill Moggridge

What The San Francisco Media Arts Council (SMAC)
will host an exclusive exhibition of reactive artworks and a
discussion exploring Reactive Art in the context of our current
cultural climate and the field of interaction design.

When
Thursday, January 23, 2003
Exhibit opening and reception: 6 - 8:30 p.m.

Friday, January 24, 2003
Exhibit open to the public, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Saturday, January 25, 2003
Exhibit open to the public, 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Conversation with the artists, 3 - 5p.m.

Admission $10 reserve your tickets at ticketweb.com

<http://www.ticketweb.com/user/?query=search&region=xxx&category=misc=
&
search=Reactive>

Where
The Schwab Room at SFMOMA
151 Third Street, San Francisco

Description

"Interactive computing" once referred to the paraphernalia and
procedures which enabled reciprocal data entry and output between a
machine and its human operator. As the relationship evolved,
cognition made its way into our definitions of "human computer
interaction," with a shift of emphasis from the mechanics of the
process to its conceptual accessibility. Today interactive
technologies have evolved into a medium through which we interact not
so much with our computers as with other people and with our
environment. The computer itself has become an interface to culture.
As wireless networks, body-sensing apparatus, and smart appliances
proliferate, the old challenge of exchanging messages with a machine
has given way to a scenario in which the machines are capable of
tracking our every move.

Some artists wholeheartedly embraced the interactivity proposition.
If viewers as co-creators could shape the flow of events, then--it
was assumed--their engagement with the work would be enhanced.
Other, more circumspect artists noted that the act of choosing does
not necessarily yield an aesthetic experience, or add meaning to the
observer's process of apprehension.

Media artist Jim Campbell, for one, has dispensed with the premise of
user control in favor of systems that measure and respond to changes
in their surroundings. Campbell points out that the "choice and
command" interface suitable for word processing, data management or
playing games usually fails as a metaphor for dialogue or for
adaptive unfolding. "Attempting to create systems that respond and
progress in recognizably non-random, but at the same time
unpredictable ways, I have tried to create works that have destinies
of their own."

Rather than requiring viewers to choose from a predetermined set of
prerecorded outputs, the "reactive artwork" poses a system in which
viewers' actions constitute an integral yet extemporaneous component,
and it displays an immediate reflection of a state in perpetual
change. Through mimicking and engaging our cognitive faculties, such
work prompts us to examine our habitual ways of perceiving, while it
invites improvisation, resulting in potentially lyrical,
multi-sensory meditations on the nature of reality.

These concepts, as well as themes of perception, memory, control, and
everyday space, are common to the sensor-laden media artworks of
Campbell, Scott Snibbe, and Crevice, a Toronto-based art collective.
Campbell's clockworks manipulate our sense of time, compelling us to
recalibrate the way we experience it. Snibbe and Crevice's
installations experiment with the spatial properties of camera and
projection frames, and invite viewers to act on the screen Such
works, says Snibbe, "increase their compositional complexity,
salience, and meaning, as more and more viewers take part in them."

SMAC is a group of new media experts and enthusiasts who produce
events, publications and activities to enhance the experience and
understanding of new media in the arts. SMAC's goal is to cultivate
the incredible wealth of art and technological resources in the San
Francisco Bay Area, fostering a closer relationship among technology
and art communities.

Admission Space is limited. Advance reservations are required
for Thursday evening reception by emailing
<mailto:mediaarts@sfmoma.org>mediaarts@sfmoma.org. And Saturday
afternoon panel discussion admission is $10. Reserve your tickets at
ticketweb.com

_________________
Marisa S. Olson
Associate Director
SF Camerawork
415. 863. 1001

DISCUSSION

reactive art (sf)


REACTIVE ART IS NOTHING WITHOUT YOU...

*A SMAC exhibition at SFMOMA , featuring work by Jim Campbell, Scott
Snibbe, and Crevice.
* A conversation with the artists and IDEO designer Bill Moggridge

What -- The San Francisco Media Arts Council (SMAC) will host an
exclusive exhibition of reactive artworks and a discussion exploring
Reactive Art in the context of our current cultural climate and the
field of interaction design.

Issue #4 of the SMAC! zine will also be available at the exhibition
and panel. Each coveted issue is produced in a limited, paper-only
edition, guest-conceptualized by a local designer (in this case, Amy
Franceschini), and features essays, commentary, and paper-based art
installations by prominent writers, theorists, and artists (look to
#4 for work by Scott Snibbe, Crevice's David Warne & Marlene Moser,
Margaret Tedesco, and Marisa S. Olson).

When --Thursday, January 23, 2003, Exhibit opening and reception: 6 - 8:30 =
p.m.
Friday, January 24, 2003, Exhibit open to the public, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Saturday, January 25, 2003, Exhibit open to the public, 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Conversation with the artists, 3-5 pm

Admission: $10. Reserve your tickets at ticketweb.com

<http://www.ticketweb.com/user/?query=search&region=xxx&category=misc=
&
search=Reactive>http://www.ticketweb.com/user/?query=search&region=xx=
x
&category=misc&search=Reactive

Where -- The Schwab Room at SFMOMA, 151 Third Street, San Francisco

<http://www.ticketweb.com/user/?query=search&region=xxx&category=misc=
&
search=Reactive>

Description "Interactive computing" once referred to the
paraphernalia and procedures which enabled reciprocal data entry and
output between a machine and its human operator. As the relationship
evolved, cognition made its way into our definitions of "human
computer interaction," with a shift of emphasis from the mechanics of
the process to its conceptual accessibility. Today interactive
technologies have evolved into a medium through which we interact not
so much with our computers as with other people and with our
environment. The computer itself has become an interface to culture.
As wireless networks, body-sensing apparatus, and smart appliances
proliferate, the old challenge of exchanging messages with a machine
has given way to a scenario in which the machines are capable of
tracking our every move.

Some artists wholeheartedly embraced the interactivity proposition.
If viewers as co-creators could shape the flow of events, then--it
was assumed--their engagement with the work would be enhanced.
Other, more circumspect artists noted that the act of choosing does
not necessarily yield an aesthetic experience, or add meaning to the
observer's process of apprehension.

Media artist Jim Campbell, for one, has dispensed with the premise of
user control in favor of systems that measure and respond to changes
in their surroundings. Campbell points out that the "choice and
command" interface suitable for word processing, data management or
playing games usually fails as a metaphor for dialogue or for
adaptive unfolding. "Attempting to create systems that respond and
progress in recognizably non-random, but at the same time
unpredictable ways, I have tried to create works that have destinies
of their own."

Rather than requiring viewers to choose from a predetermined set of
prerecorded outputs, the "reactive artwork" poses a system in which
viewers' actions constitute an integral yet extemporaneous component,
and it displays an immediate reflection of a state in perpetual
change. Through mimicking and engaging our cognitive faculties, such
work prompts us to examine our habitual ways of perceiving, while it
invites improvisation, resulting in potentially lyrical,
multi-sensory meditations on the nature of reality.

These concepts, as well as themes of perception, memory, control, and
everyday space, are common to the sensor-laden media artworks of
Campbell, Scott Snibbe, and Crevice, a Toronto-based art collective.
Campbell's clockworks manipulate our sense of time, compelling us to
recalibrate the way we experience it. Snibbe and Crevice's
installations experiment with the spatial properties of camera and
projection frames, and invite viewers to act on the screen Such
works, says Snibbe, "increase their compositional complexity,
salience, and meaning, as more and more viewers take part in them."

Who -- This event is organized by SMAC Event Co-Chairs Neil Kaye,
Rachel Strickland, and Alissa Bushnell, with SFMOMA Media Arts
Curator Benjamin Weil, Stephanie Knecht and Nathalie Dubuc. SMAC's
program director and zine editor is Marisa S. Olson. She and her
co-founder, Grace Hawthorne, have been hard at work to bring you a
Issue #4 of the SMAC! zine.

SMAC is a group of new media experts and enthusiasts who produce
events, publications and activities to enhance the experience and
understanding of new media in the arts. SMAC's goal is to cultivate
the incredible wealth of art and technological resources in the San
Francisco Bay Area, fostering a closer relationship among technology
and art communities.

Admission -- Space is limited. Advance reservations are required for
Thursday evening reception by e-mailing mediaarts@sfmoma.org. And
Saturday afternoon panel discussion admission is $10. Reserve your
tickets at ticketweb.com

http://www.ticketweb.com/user/?query=search&region=xxx&category=misc&=
s
earch=Reactive

_________________
Marisa S. Olson
Associate Director
SF Camerawork
415. 863. 1001