Marisa Olson
Since the beginning
Works in New York, New York United States of America

PORTFOLIO (10)
BIO
Marisa Olson is an artist, writer, and media theorist. Her interdisciplinary work has been exhibited at the Venice Biennale, Centre Pompidou, Tate(s) Modern + Liverpool, the Nam June Paik Art Center, British Film Institute, Sundance Film Festival, PERFORMA Biennial, and has been commissioned and collected by the Whitney Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Houston Center for Photography, Experimental Television Center, and PS122. This work's been reviewed in Artforum, Art21, Liberation, Folha de Sao Paolo, the Village Voice, and elsewhere. New York Magazine has called Marisa one of the Top Five video artists working online, Wired has called her both funny and humorous, the New York Times once called her "anything but stupid," and the Wall Street Journal considers her their "Walkman Historian" of choice.

Marisa actively contributes to the field, writing for many major art publications, ranging from magazines & exhibition catalogs to academic journals and chapters in books on the history and theory of media art. She has served as Editor & Curator at Rhizome, the inaugural curator at Zero1, and Associate Director at SF Camerawork, whose Journal she edited. In 2013 LINK Editions will publish a retrospective anthology of over a decade of her writings on contemporary art which have helped establish a vocabulary for the criticism of new media. Meanwhile, Marisa has also curated programs at the Guggenheim, New Museum, SFMOMA, White Columns, and Artists Space. She has served on Advisory Boards for Ars Electronica, Transmediale, ISEA, the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences, Creative Capital, EYEBEAM, the Getty Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Kennedy Center, and the Tribeca Film Festival.

Marisa studied Fine Art at Goldsmiths, History of Consciousness at UC Santa Cruz, and Rhetoric & Film Studies at UC Berkeley. She has recently been a visiting artist at Yale, Oberlin, VCU, UC-Boulder's Brakhage Symposium, Penn State, Visiting Faculty at Bard College's Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, and Visiting Faculty at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago's Ox-Bow program. She previously taught at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts' new media graduate program and was Assistant Professor of New Media at SUNY-Purchase's School of Film & Media Studies. She is currently Visiting Critic at Brown University.

booomerrranganggboobooomerranrang: Nancy Holt's networked video


Nancy Holt, Boomerang (1974), still from video.

In her time on this planet, Nancy Holt came to be known as a great American Land Artist, and certainly her brilliant installations, like Utah's Sun Tunnels and collaborations with her partner Robert Smithson and their peers, are profoundly significant, but it was her work in film & video that has had the greatest personal impact on me.

I somehow didn't see Boomerang, her 1974 video performance usually credited to her collaborator Richard Serra, until I was a Ph.D. student in Linda Williams's Phenomenology of Film seminar at UC Berkeley's Rhetoric program, but the time delay was more than made up for by the work's formative resonance. In the video, made during Serra's residency at a Texas television station, a young Holt is seen sitting in an anchor's chair before a staid blue background. Despite brief station ID graphic overlays and one minute of silence in the midst of the ten-minute piece (announced as audio trouble and reminding viewers of the work's live TV origin), the work is in many ways sound-centric.


Sound and Image in Electronic Harmony


semiconductor_nanowebbers.jpg
Image: Semiconductor: Ruth Jarman and Joseph Gerhardt, 200 Nanowebbers, 2005

On Saturday, April 11th, New York's School of Visual Arts will co-present the 2009 Visual Music Marathon with the New York Digital Salon and Northeastern University. Promising genre-bending work from fifteen countries, the lineup crams 120 works by new media artists and digital composers into 12 hours. If it's true, as is often said, that MTV killed the attention spans of Generations X and Y, this six-minute-per-piece average ought to suit most festivalgoers' minds, and the resultant shuffling on and off stage will surely be a spectacle in its own rite. In all seriousness, this annual event is a highlight of New York's already thriving electronic music scene and promises many a treat for your eyes and ears. The illustrious organizers behind the marathon know their visual music history and want to remind readers that, "The roots of the genre date back more than two hundred years to the ocular harpsichords and color-music scales of the 18th century," and "the current art form came to fruition following the emergence of film and video in the 20th century." The remarkable ten dozen artists participating in this one-day event will bring us work incorporating such diverse materials as hand-processed film, algorithmically-generated video, visual interpretations of music, and some good old fashioned music-music. From luminaries like Oskar Fischinger, Hans Richter, and Steina Vasulka to emerging artists Joe Tekippe and Chiaki Watanabe, the program will be another star on the map that claims NYC as fertile territory for sonic exploration. - Marisa Olson

READ ON »


Tagalicious


Picture-1.jpg

The National Museum of Contemporary Art (EMST) in Athens, Greece, has committed itself to curating a number of recent exhibitions of internet art. Their current show, "Tag Ties and Affective Spies," features contributions from both net vets and emerging surfers, including Christophe Bruno, Gregory Chatonsky, Paolo Cirio, JODI, Jonathan Harris and Sep Kamvar, Les Liens Invisibles, Personal Cinema and The Erasers, Ramsay Stirling, and Wayne Clements. The online exhibition takes an antagonistic approach to Web 2.0, citing a constant balance "between order and chaos, democracy and adhocracy." Curator Daphne Dragona raises the question of whether the social web is a preexisting platform on which people connect, or whether it is indeed constructed in the act of uploading, tagging, and disclosing previously private information about ourselves on sites like Flickr, YouTube, and Facebook. Dragona asks whether we are truly connecting and interacting, or merely broadcasting. While her curatorial statement doesn't address the issue directly, the show's title hints at the level of self-surveillance in play on these sites. Accordingly, many of the selected works take a critical, if not DIY, approach to the internet. The collective Les Liens Invisibles tends to create works that make an ironic mash-up of the often divergent mantras of tactical media, culture jamming, surrealism, and situationism. In their Subvertr, they encourage Flickr users to "subverTag" their posted images, creating an intentional disassociation between an image's content and its interpretion, with the aim of "breaking the strict rules of significance that characterize the mainstream collective imaginary..." JODI's work, Del.icio.us/ winning information (2008) exploits the limited stylistic parameters of the social bookmarking site. Using ASCII and Unicode page titles to form visual marks, a cryptic tag vocabulary, and a recursive taxonomy, their fun-to-follow site critiques the broader content of the web ...

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Reappearance of the Undead


agatha_appears_lialina.gif

In 1997, internet art hall-of-famer Olia Lialina made a "net drama" called Agatha Appears that was written for Netscape 3 and 4 in HTML 3.2. One of the main features of the interactive narrative was the travel of the eponymous avatar across the internet. Let's just say the girl got around. But the magical illusion of the piece was that she appeared to stay still, even when links in the narrative were clicked and the viewer's address bar indicated movement to another server. But in time, both the browser and code in which the story was written became defunct and the piece unraveled as the sites previously hosting the links and files upon which Agatha was dependent disappeared or cleaned house. Such a scenario is common to early internet art (and will no doubt continue to plague the field), as ours is an upgrade culture constantly driving towards new tools, platforms, and codes. Many have debated whether to let older works whither or how it might be possible to update these works, making them compatible with new systems. For those who are interested, some of the best research on the subject has been performed by the folks affiliated with the Variable Media Initiative. Meanwhile, luddites and neophiles alike are now in luck because Agatha Appears has just undergone rejuvenation. Ela Wysocka, a restorer working at Budapest's Center for Culture & Communication Foundation has worked to overcome the sound problems, code incompatibilities, and file corruption and disappearance issues, and she's written a fascinating report about the process, here. And new collaborating hosts have jumped in line to bring the piece back to life, so that like a black and white boyfriend coming home from war, Agatha now offers us a shiny new webring as a token of ...

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In the Future-Past Tense



The fantasy of the future and the utopian promises of new technologies have always gone hand-in-hand. If the history of technology's evolution tells the story of our culture, we can also trace our present-day novelties back to the root of our anxieties about the future and the problems these devices hoped to solve. With this correlation in mind, the interactive DVD novel The Imaginary 20th Century (2007) by Norman Klein, Margo Bistis, and Andreas Kratky, jumps back to the fin de siècle era between the 19th and 20th centuries. It was a time of wonder when new technologies and their representation were wedded in documents like panoramic films of public light shows and short actualities about newfangled transportation devices called roller skates. The novel tells the story of "the Chicago World's Fair in 1893, and the story of a woman (Carrie), who in 1901, selects four men to seduce her, each with his own version of the new century" in a recombinatory visual narrative that overlaps 2,200 images culled from primary documents, architectural plans, photos, and other ephemera with an original score. The project speaks to the multiplicity of visions circulating about what the new century would hold, and it's an even more past-tense follow-up to Norman Klein's interactive novel, Bleeding Through: Layers of Los Angeles, 1920-1986 (2003). Klein's work has clearly resonated with at least eleven people, because closing this week at Otis College of Art and Design's Ben Maltz Gallery is "The Future Imaginary," an exhibition that responds to The Imaginary 20th Century with the work of artists Deborah Aschheim, Jeff Cain, Tom Jennings, Jon Kessler, Ed Osborn, Lea Rekow, Douglas Repetto, Phil Ross, Kari Rae Seekins and Aaron Drake, and Susan Simpson. Each contribution embodies the special genre of ...

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Discussions (280) Opportunities (10) Events (4) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Deadline extended: Rhizome Curatorial Fellow


Hello. Because I know that these things tend to revolve around school
schedules, I've extended the deadline for this by one week, to Wednesday,
9/20. Please forward to students, colleagues, etc...

JOB OPPORTUNITY:
Curatorial Fellow
(part-time, unpaid)
RHIZOME.ORG

Rhizome.org is a leading new media arts organization and an affiliate of
the New Museum of Contemporary Art. Currently celebrating our tenth
anniversary, Rhizome's programs support the creation, presentation,
discussion and preservation of contemporary art that uses new technologies
in significant ways. These include online publications and discussion
lists, exhibitions (online & offline), performances, screenings, public
talks and events, the ArtBase archive, artists' commissions, and other
educational programs. For more information about Rhizome, visit:

http://rhizome.org/info/

Rhizome seeks a Curatorial Fellow to assist with the research, planning,
and production of exhibitions and public programs, as well as writing and
editing content for Rhizome's website and publications. This position is a
unique opportunity for a person interested in pursuing a career in the new
media arts field to further their engagement with the community and hone
their professional skills.

The Curatorial Fellow must be based in New York and must be able to commit
to 15 hours of work per week, for an academic year, beginning in September
2006 and ending in the summer of 2007. These hours may include occasional
evening and weekend events. This position is unpaid, but academic credit
may be arranged.

Reporting directly to Rhizome's Editor & Curator, the Curatorial Fellow
will work on all phases of the exhibition and editorial processes,
including researching new projects, writing copy, and assisting with the
implementation of current programs. The Curatorial Fellow will also
develop crucial experience in development and communications. The Fellow's
primary responsibilities may include:

* Becoming a Site Editor and assisting with the management of reBlog content
* Writing and editing occasional Rhizome News articles and other texts
* Researching editorial ideas and writers
* Liaising with artists, public program participants, and venues
* Assisting in the promotion of events
* Co-coordinating the Rhizome ArtBase, including researching art works
* Planning, production, and on-site coordination of public events

As the Curatorial Fellow advances, there may be opportunities to curate an
exhibition or event, and to write feature articles. In general, the Fellow
will play an important role in helping to strategize and execute strong,
dynamic programs and editorial content.

QUALIFICATIONS:
Candidates should have a level of familiarity with new media and its
histories and discourses. They should also possess a Master's degree or be
enrolled in a graduate rpogram. At least one year of arts administration
experience is required and preference will be given to candidates with
prior curatorial and/or editorial experience. At a minimum, the candidate
should have very strong writing, editing, and analytical skills, and very
high internet literacy. Knowledge of Microsoft Office software is also
required and basic Photoshop skills are preferred.

TO APPLY:
Please email a cover letter, resume or c.v., three references, and three
writing samples (url's or attachments) to Marisa Olson at
marisa(at)rhizome.org. Review of applications will begin immediately and
all materials should be submitted by Wednesday, September 20, for
consideration.

+ + +
Marisa Olson
Editor & Curator
Rhizome.org at the
New Museum of Contemporary Art

OPPORTUNITY

Rhizome seeks Curatorial Fellow


Deadline:
Tue Aug 22, 2006 21:15

Please forward...

JOB OPPORTUNITY:
Curatorial Fellow
(part-time, unpaid)
RHIZOME.ORG

Rhizome.org is a leading new media arts organization and an affiliate of
the New Museum of Contemporary Art. Currently celebrating our tenth
anniversary, Rhizome's programs support the creation, presentation,
discussion and preservation of contemporary art that uses new technologies
in significant ways. These include online publications and discussion
lists, exhibitions (online & offline), performances, screenings, public
talks and events, the ArtBase archive, artists' commissions, and other
educational programs. For more information about Rhizome, visit:

http://rhizome.org/info/

Rhizome seeks a Curatorial Fellow to assist with the research, planning,
and production of exhibitions and public programs, as well as writing and
editing content for Rhizome's website and publications. This position is a
unique opportunity for a person interested in pursuing a career in the new
media arts field to further their engagement with the community and hone
their professional skills.

The Curatorial Fellow must be based in New York and must be able to commit
to 15 hours of work per week, for an academic year, beginning in September
2006 and ending in the summer of 2007. These hours may include occasional
evening and weekend events. This position is unpaid, but academic credit
may be arranged.

Reporting directly to Rhizome's Editor & Curator, the Curatorial Fellow
will work on all phases of the exhibition and editorial processes,
including researching new projects, writing copy, and assisting with the
implementation of current programs. The Curatorial Fellow will also
develop crucial experience in development and communications. The Fellow's
primary responsibilities may include:

* Becoming a Site Editor and assisting with the management of reBlog content
* Writing and editing occasional Rhizome News articles and other texts
* Researching editorial ideas and writers
* Liaising with artists, public program participants, and venues
* Assisting in the promotion of events
* Co-coordinating the Rhizome ArtBase, including researching art works
* Planning, production, and on-site coordination of public events

As the Curatorial Fellow advances, there may be opportunities to curate an
exhibition or event, and to write feature articles. In general, the Fellow
will play an important role in helping to strategize and execute strong,
dynamic programs and editorial content.

QUALIFICATIONS:
Candidates should have a level of familiarity with new media and its
histories and discourses. They should also possess or expect to complete a
Master's degree by 2007. At least one year of arts administration
experience is required and preference will be given to candidates with
prior curatorial and/or editorial experience. At a minimum, the candidate
should have very strong writing, editing, and analytical skills, and very
high internet literacy. Knowledge of Microsoft Office software is also
required and basic Photoshop skills are preferred.

TO APPLY:
Please email a cover letter, resume or c.v., three references, and three
writing samples (url's or attachments) to Marisa Olson at
marisa(at)rhizome.org. Review of applications will begin immediately and
all materials must be submitted by Wednesday, September 13, for
consideration.

+ + +
Marisa Olson
Editor & Curator
Rhizome.org at the
New Museum of Contemporary Art


DISCUSSION

Faultlines Online Exhibition


Coinciding with the launch of Rhizome's Tenth Anniversary Festival of Art
& Technology is the opening of 'Faultlines,' a Rhizome-curated online
exhibition that is the first in Time Shares, our joint series with the New
Museum of Contemporary Art. Details below...

FAULTLINES
http://www.rhizome.org/events/timeshares/

Over the past decade, as the Internet has become a mass medium, a number
of large, dynamic communities have sprung up online. For instance, social
networking sites like MySpace and Xanga boast millions of subscribers
(mostly teenagers or young adults) and Second Life, which is both a game
and a virtual civilization where players can do anything from organize art
shows to buy condominiums, currently has upwards of 366,662 residents.
Rhizome, itself, was founded as a global, Internet-based community in
1996. Here, as in societies offline, community is expressed as a dynamic,
complicated, disharmonious and productive place. The works in Faultlines
consider the desires, fictions and anxieties embedded in online
communities and also reveal how "real-world" issues, such as commerce and
international politics, drive relationships in the virtual sphere just as
they do offline.

Artists: Mauricio Arango, Anil Dash, Takuji Kogo, Golan Levin with Kamal
Nigam and Jonathan Feinberg, Guthrie Lonergan, Warren Sack, Jon Thomson
and Alison Craighead.

Faultlines is a parallel program with ISEA2006/ZeroOne San Jose (01sj.org).

TIME SHARES
Organized by Rhizome and co-presented the New Museum of Contemporary Art,
Time Shares is a series of online exhibitions dedicated to exploring the
diversity of contemporary art based on the Internet. Every six weeks,
Rhizome and invited curators will launch a new exhibition featuring an
international group of artists.

+ + +

Marisa Olson
Editor & Curator
Rhizome.org at the
New Museum of Contemporary Art

DISCUSSION

Rhizome 10th Anniversary Festival


It is with tremendous excitement that Rhizome launches our Tenth
Anniversary Festival of Art & Technology, this week. We've developed a
seven-month season of diverse programs, in partnership with some fantastic
organizations committed to supporting new media art.

You can check out the Festival, here:
http://www.rhizome.org/events/tenyear/

Though this Festival is really about looking ahead, this is a good moment
to reflect and say thanks. We're proud of what Rhizome's done and become,
in the last ten years. The organization has grown from a mailing list to
an active membership organization serving a wide audience with multiple
programs. We have our community, especially our members, to thank for
this.

Speaking of community, we also want to encourage you to participate in
Keylines, the Festival's collaborative writing project in which seed posts
on the topics of new media histories & genres, feminism, the environment,
politics, communities, and innovation have already been planted. We hope
you'll help these lines of discussion grow...

Other Festival highlights include Time Shares, a series of online
exhibitions co-presented with the New Museum of Contemporary Art to
emphasize our ongoing commitment to internet-based art, and a number of
offline exhibitions, performances, panel discussions, book launches, and
more.

A big thank-you to all the artists, writers, venues, and sponsors who've
leant their support to the Festival.

We'll be sending out individual announcements about programs as they come
up on the calendar.

With thanks,
The Rhizome Team

+ + +

Marisa Olson
Editor & Curator
Rhizome.org at the
New Museum of Contemporary Art

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: RHIZOME_RAW: on bad digital art


Hey, Pall, et al.

I'm trying to wrap my head around your distinction, here. It's interesting.

My first response to your initial email was that your two categories
might leave out a lot of work. What about art in which technology is
the object (or 'final product'), rather than a tool for the creation
of some other object? And what about work that engages with technology
as it's _subject_? Admittedly, the latter can include lots of things
that are neither digital or electronic, but I still find them
interesting to consider in this wider context...

For the sake of vocabulary, would you mind giving a specific example
regarding the utility of the tech vs the tech, itself? It doesn't have
to be an Art example, per se, just a practical example--perhaps a
software one? A railroad one..?

I ask because I think your distinction raises lots of questions. It
might imply that technologies may not be defined by their utility
(separate from Marxist use value, of course), but actually...

* What's the relation between a thing's definition/being and its
function (assuming this is the same as utility)?
* What is the relationship between the constitution of the tech and labor?
* Btwn the employment of the tech's utility & labor? (ie the game
coder vs the gamer--this gets at authorship, too)
* If you change a tech's intended utility, do you change it's
definition/being/meaning?
* If you change an object's intended utility, do you change it's
definition/being/meaning?
* What's the difference between the last two questions, in your own
definition of these things?

These questions (or, rather, their answers) could have many wider
artistic & political implications. Think, for instance, of
hacktivism... How do things change? What's the relationship between
changing a tool or object and social change? Can technological change
(which is a largely chronological process, whether you approach it
from a more deterministic or materialist perspective) and/or changing
of a [thing] (through remixing, viral attack, parody, etc) be a _tool_
for social change?

What is the utility of utility, Pall? :)

Oh, and also... If only on behalf of all the bad artists, I might ask
that we not use the word 'bad.' (Unless, of course, you use it as
Michael Jackson did.) Since we're talking about utility, anyway, maybe
we should simply look at whether it gets the job done. This invokes a
more functional than emotional aesthetic, and I won't deny the
thumbs-up/thumbs-down inclination, but if we're charging ourselves
with some more thoughtful form of criticism, maybe we should just look
at the means by which the work attempts to do what it does, and how
successful it is in that regard.

Marisa

On 8/9/06, p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca <p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca> wrote:
> I'm not going to address any responses just yet. I'm going to wait a bit and see
>
> what happens. Part of what I'm interested in is seeing how people interpret my
> original post. However, I just want to clarify one thing so that the discussion
>
> doesn't veer off into outer space. By "using utility of technology", I'm not
> referring to utility as opposed to non-utility. Rather, I'm referring to the
> public conception of the way any technology was or is meant to be used. "Art
> that uses technology as a medium" can still have utility but that utility
> doesn't necessarily have to have anything to do with the technology's intended
> or perceived utility.
>
> Pall
>
> Quoting jonCates <joncates@criticalartware.net>:
>
> > On Aug 9, 2006, at 8:15 AM, Pall Thayer wrote:
> > > >Something occured to me last night and I'm going to toss it out
> > > there and see what people think.
> >
> > "Utopian technology is that technology which has fallen from grace.
> > It has been stripped of its purity and reendowed with utility. The
> > fall is necessitated by a return to contact with humanity. Having
> > once left the production table, the technology that lives the godly
> > life of state-of- the-art uselessness has no further interaction with
> > humans as users or as inventors; rather, humans serve only as a means
> > to maintain its uselessness. The location of the most complex pure
> > technology is of no mystery. Deep in the core of the war machine is
> > the missile system. Ultimately, all research is centered around this
> > invisible monument to uselessness. The bigger and more powerful it
> > becomes, the greater its value. But should it ever be touched by
> > utility - that is should it ever be used - its value becomes naught.
> > To be of value, it must be maintained, upgraded, and expanded, but it
> > must never actually do anything. This idol of destruction is forever
> > hungry, and is willing to eat all resources. In return, however, it
> > excretes objects of utility. Consumer communications and
> > transportation systems, for example, have dramatically improved due
> > to the continuous research aimed at increasing the grandeur of the
> > apparatus of uselessness.
> >
> > There can be a stopping point to this process - a discovery made by
> > the collapsing Soviet Union. For all the `patriots of democracy' who
> > gave a collective sigh of relief and boasted that they were at last
> > proven right - "communism doesn't work" - there still may be a need
> > to worry. The fall of the USSR had little to do with ideology. The US
> > and USSR were competitors in producing the best apparatus of
> > uselessness in order to prove its own respective Hegelian mastery of
> > the globe. Modern autocrats and oligarchs have long known that a
> > standing army puts an undue strain on the economy. To be sure,
> > standing armies were early monuments to uselessness, but in terms of
> > both size and cost, they are dwarfed by the standing missile system
> > of the electronic age. As with all things that are useless, there
> > will be no return on the investment in it. The useless represents a
> > 100% loss of capital.
> >
> > Although such investment seems to go against the utilitarian grain of
> > visible bourgeois culture, whether in socialist or in constitutional
> > republics, the compulsive desire for a useless master is much greater
> > (Japan is an interesting exception to this rule). Unfortunately for
> > the USSR, they were unable to indulge in pure excess expenditure at
> > the same rate as the US. The soviet techno-idol was a little more
> > constipated, and could not maintain the needed rate of excretion.
> > Consequently, once the limits of uselessness were reached, that
> > system imploded.
> >
> > The US government, on the other hand, has to this day remained
> > convinced that further progress can be made. Reagan and his Star Wars
> > campaign issued a policy radically expanding the useless. Reagan, of
> > course, was the perfect one to make the policy, since he was an idol
> > to uselessness himself. He represents one of the few times that
> > uselessness has taken an organic form in this century. (This is part
> > of the reason he was considered such a bourgeois hero. He was willing
> > to personally plunge into uselessness without apology. He did not let
> > a thing stand in for him). Playing on yuppie paranoia (the fascists'
> > friend), Reagan convinced the public loyal to him that a defensive
> > monument (Star Wars) to uselessness was needed, just in case the
> > offensive monument (the missile system) was not enough. He was
> > successful enough in his plea to guarantee that years of useless
> > research will ensue that no one will be able to stop, even if his
> > original monumental vision (a net of laser armed satellites) should
> > be erased. In this manner, Reagan made sure that the apparatus of
> > uselessness would expand even if the cold war ended."
> >
> > data.src:
> >
> > title: The Technology Of Uselessness
> > dvr: Critical Art Ensemble
> > date: 1994
> > uri: http://www.ctheory.net/articles.aspx?idY
> >
> > // jonCates
> > # criticalartware - core.developer
> > # http://www.criticalartware.net
> > +
> > -> post: list@rhizome.org
> > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> > -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> > +
> > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> > Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
> >
>
>
> --
>
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
>