marc garrett
Since the beginning
Works in London United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

PORTFOLIO (4)
BIO
Marc Garrett is co-director and co-founder, with artist Ruth Catlow of the Internet arts collectives and communities – Furtherfield.org, Furthernoise.org, Netbehaviour.org, also co-founder and co-curator/director of the gallery space formerly known as 'HTTP Gallery' now called the Furtherfield Gallery in London (Finsbury Park), UK. Co-curating various contemporary Media Arts exhibitions, projects nationally and internationally. Co-editor of 'Artists Re:Thinking Games' with Ruth Catlow and Corrado Morgana 2010. Hosted Furtherfield's critically acclaimed weekly broadcast on UK's Resonance FM Radio, a series of hour long live interviews with people working at the edge of contemporary practices in art, technology & social change. Currently doing an Art history Phd at the University of London, Birkbeck College.

Net artist, media artist, curator, writer, street artist, activist, educationalist and musician. Emerging in the late 80′s from the streets exploring creativity via agit-art tactics. Using unofficial, experimental platforms such as the streets, pirate radio such as the locally popular ‘Savage Yet Tender’ alternative broadcasting 1980′s group, net broadcasts, BBS systems, performance, intervention, events, pamphlets, warehouses and gallery spaces. In the early nineties, was co-sysop (systems operator) with Heath Bunting on Cybercafe BBS with Irational.org.

Our mission is to co-create extraordinary art that connects with contemporary audiences providing innovative, engaging and inclusive digital and physical spaces for appreciating and participating in practices in art, technology and social change. As well as finding alternative ways around already dominating hegemonies, thus claiming for ourselves and our peer networks a culturally aware and critical dialogue beyond traditional hierarchical behaviours. Influenced by situationist theory, fluxus, free and open source culture, and processes of self-education and peer learning, in an art, activist and community context.
Discussions (1673) Opportunities (12) Events (175) Jobs (2)
DISCUSSION

Mash Smarter Not Harder: An Interview with Benjamin Berg


Mash Smarter Not Harder: An Interview with Benjamin Berg. By Monty Cantsin.

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Benjamin Berg (AKA stAllio!) has made a career for himself as a member of the Indianapolis-based art band Animals Within Animals (AWIA) since the turn of this century; Alongside this, Berg has emerged as the host of a rad radio program on Numbers FM as the founder/curator of ‘glitchgifs’ on Tumblr, and even as a Pillow-seller. Monty Cantsin corresponded with the artist recently by email for this interview.

http://furtherfield.org/features/interviews/mash-smarter-not-harder-interview-benjamin-berg

DISCUSSION

Furtherfield and Contemporary Art Culture - Where We Are Now


Furtherfield and Contemporary Art Culture - Where We Are Now

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http://www.furtherfield.org/features/articles/furtherfield-and-contemporary-art-culture-where-we-are-now

Marc Garrett reflects on Furtherfield’s role and direction as a rhizomatic arts collective. He argues that the mainstream art world is becoming less relevant in contemporary life. He presents a selection of artworks, projects and events shown in their public gallery in Finsbury Park over the past 2 years and discusses Furtherfield's new lab space, the Furtherfield Commons. This presentation was given at the ICA, London and to students at the Institute of Creative Technologies, De Montfort University, Leicester in late November 2103.


DISCUSSION

Data-Driven Artists And Their Critics


Data-Driven Artists And Their Critics

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Features Jonas Lund & Shardcore…
http://www.furtherfield.org/features/reviews/data-driven-artists-and-their-critics

By Rob Myers.

Making art specified by a computer program is nothing new but artists using Big Data and Open Data are changing its relationship to artworld production. Can such software really replace artists, and if so are art critics any safer? Jonas Lund's "The Fear Of Missing Out" (2013) and Shardcore's generative art may hold some of the answers.

"Art fabricated by an artist following a computer-generated specification is nothing new. Prior to modern 2D and 3D printing techniques, transcribing a computer generated design into paint or metal by hand was the only way to present artworks that pen plotters or CNC mills couldn't capture. But a Tamagotchi-gamer or Amazon Mechanical Turk-style human servicing of machine agency where a program dictates the conception of an artwork for a human artist to realize also has a history. The principles involved go back even further to the use of games of chance and other automatic techniques in Dada and Surrealism."


DISCUSSION

Liquid Surveillance, the soft power of UBERMORGEN


Liquid Surveillance, the soft power of UBERMORGEN.

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UBERMORGEN, Vladimir (2013) . Image courtesy of Caroll Fletcher gallery.

Rachel Falconer's article is written in response to an interview conducted with lizvlx and Hans Bernhard from Ubermorgen. 'userunfriendly' is their first solo exhibition in London and presents a performative study of creeping paranoia. It is on show at Caroll/Fletcher Gallery through October until 16th November 2013.

"UBERMORGEN, approach phenomena such as Snowden, and other symptoms of perceived hyper-capitalism from a fuzzier, more ambiguous subjectivity. In their quest for knowledge production and social dialogue, the artists present and re-present the conditions of our global socio-political situation as physical and ephemeral catalysts of open-ended investigation." Falconer.

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/articles/liquid-surveillance-soft-power-ubermorgen

OPPORTUNITY

Open Discussion: Giving What You Don’t Have


Deadline:
Sat Oct 26, 2013 14:00

Location:
London, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

Cornelia Sollfrank will present her latest film Giving What You Don't Have at the Furtherfield Gallery. It features interviews with individuals Kenneth Goldsmith, Marcell Mars, Sean Dockray, Dmitry Kleiner, discussing with Sollfrank their projects and ideas on peer-to-peer production and distribution as art practice. After the film viewing there will be a discussion led by Marc Garrett, Cornelia Sollfrank, Joss Hands & Rachel Baker.

On the basis of the interviews of Giving What You Don't Have, we would like to discuss some of the issues they represent such as new forms of collaborative production, the shift of production from artefacts to the provision of open tools and infrastructures, the development of formats for self-organisation in education and knowledge transfer, (the potential and the limits of) open content licensing as well as the creation of independent ways of distributing cultural goods. An implicit part of Giving What You Don't Have is a suggested reconceptualization of art under networked conditions.