marc garrett
Since the beginning
Works in London United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

PORTFOLIO (7)
BIO
Net artist, media artist, curator, writer, street artist, activist, educationalist and musician. Emerging in the late 80's from the streets exploring creativity via agit-art tactics. Using unofficial, experimental platforms such as the streets, pirate radio such as the locally popular 'Savage Yet Tender' alternative broadcasting 1980's group, net broadcasts, BBS systems, performance, intervention, events, pamphlets, warehouses and gallery spaces. In the early nineties, was co-sysop (systems operator) for a while with Heath Bunting on Cybercafe BBS, dedicated to arts, technology and hacking.

Co-director and co-founder, with artist Ruth Catlow of the net arts collectives and communities- furtherfield.org, furthernoise.org, netbehaviour.org, also cofounder and co-curator/director of the gallery space called HTTP Gallery in London, UK. Currently involved in co-running, collaborating with many others on Node.London. Also co-curating various contemporary Media Arts exhibitions, nationally and Internationally such as Game/play a touring exhibiton.
Discussions (1651) Opportunities (11) Events (175) Jobs (2)
DISCUSSION

Outsider Art: The Art Market's 'Cultural Capitalism' Moment.


Outsider Art: The Art Market's 'Cultural Capitalism' Moment.

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New article on Furtherfield by Robert Jackson
http://www.furtherfield.org/features/articles/outsider-art-art-markets-cultural-capitalism-moment

We all know what Outsider Art is, and the fallaciousness of the term - yet, why is the mainstream art world suddenly turning towards it?

"The 55th Venice Biennale has arrived, and with it brings a new state of trends which are pontificated around, with a chuckle, a sense of forced opportunity and the shrugged sigh of 'well, everyone's doing this now apparently.' Outsider artworks (echoing Dubuffet) are aesthetically valuable, precisely insofar as they haven't been created for the sole purpose of critique, nor for being deliberately market-friendly (the last point is quite contentious). They are what they are. Or at least, 'what they are' is grouped around a deviation from the mainstream 'norm'."

Robert Jackson, is currently studying an MPhil/PhD at Lancaster University. His thesis focuses on Algorithmic Artworks, Art Formalism and Speculative Realist Ontologies, looking at digital artworks which operate as configurable units rather than networked systems, and attain independent autonomy themselves which are capable of aesthetics, rather than any supposed primary function as communicative, rational tools. The working title is Algorithm, Contingency and The Non-Human: The Aesthetics of Undecidability in Computational Art.

DISCUSSION

Drone: Camera, Weapon,Toy: The Aestheticization of Dark Technology


Drone: Camera, Weapon,Toy: The Aestheticization of Dark Technology

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Patrick Lichty in his essay explores the aestheticization of unmanned mobile devices more commonly known as drones. What emerges is a cultural landscape where a burgeoning remote air force polices the globe while the images generated by them elicit a perverse visual fascination amongst certain subcultures, whilst also being flown by techno-enthusiasts. What is developing is a complex set of relations that is abstracting power, interaction, and representation.

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/articles/drone-camera-weapontoy-aestheticization-dark-technology

DISCUSSION

Glitch As Symbolic Form


Glitch As Symbolic Form

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Image by David Szauder (http://pixelnoizz.wordpress.com)

Rob Myers takes us on a short historical journey of Glitch as an aesthetic signifier of technological presence that dates back at least to the 1980s. Referencing the Vaught-Kampf machine in Blade Runner (1982), the titular character in Max Headroom (1985). And how the use of Glitch as an artistic aesthetic in itself has accelerated with the democratisation of new technologies.

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/articles/glitch-symbolic-form

DISCUSSION

The Impulse of the Geocities Archive: One Terabyte Of Kilobyte Age.


The Impulse of the Geocities Archive: One Terabyte Of Kilobyte Age.

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Daniel Rourke visits the Photographers' Gallery in central London and reviews their latest exhibit One Terabyte of Kilobyte Age by artists Olia Lialina and Dragan Espenschied, on THE WALL. Over an eight week period (18 April - 17 June 2013) they feature a non-stop stream of video captures of what they term as the lost city and its archival ruins. A documentation of a past visual culture of the web and the creativity of its users with new pages changing every 5 minutes. The project provides a glimpse into web publishing when users were in charge of design and narration in contrast to the automated templates of Facebook, YouTube and Flickr.

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/impulse-geocities-archive-one-terabyte-kilobyte-age

Moscow-born artist Olia Lialina has, for the past decade, produced many influential works of network-based art: My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (1996), Agatha Appears (1997), First Real Net Art Gallery (1998), and Last Real Net Art Museum (2000). Currently she is a professor at Merz Akademie in Germany. Lialina writes on digital culture, net art and web vernacular. http://art.teleportacia.org/

Dragan Espenschied, born in Germany. His music and online art has received international acclaim. He co-founded the home computer band Bodenständig 2000 that toured and released records throughout Europe and the USA. He has also won the Webby Awards People's Voice NET ART (2004), and the ZKM International Media Art Award (2001). http://1x-upon.com/~despens/

Daniel Rourke is undertaking a PhD in Art (and writing) Practice at Goldsmiths, University of London. My research project explores digital autonomy, (post)human error and glitches in Things. As well as writing for Furtherfield, he recently started writing for Rhizome.org. He is also a visiting lecturer in Writing Contexts for the History of Art, Design and Film (BA) at Kingston University, London. http://machinemachine.net/

DISCUSSION

McKenzie Wark presents his latest book The Spectacle of Disintegration


McKenzie Wark presents his latest book The Spectacle of Disintegration

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Reason #732 to Learn How to Speak French: The Guy Debord Cineaste streams

BOOK A PLACE for May 25th
This event has limited availability, to book a place please contact: ale@furtherfield.org

http://www.furtherfield.org/programmes/event/authors-talk-spectacle-disintegration

McKenzie Wark, author of The Beach Beneath the Street, will give a talk at Furtherfield Gallery (London) about his latest book The Spectacle of Disintegration - Situationist Passages Out of the 20th Century.

Writer and academic Dr Richard Barbrook will give a short introduction to Wark's work and to Situationism and its relevance to contemporary culture.

Following his acclaimed history of the SI, The Beach Beneath the Street, McKenzie Wark continues the story after the failures of May 1968. Charting its post-sixties legacy and putting the late work of the Situationists in a broader, deeper context, Wark locates their contemporary relevance, as digital culture opens up new possibilities of experience and new terrains of struggle.

The Spectacle of Disintegration takes the reader through Guy Debord’s late films and his surprising work as a game designer, the political aesthetics of former Situationist T.J. Clark, the Fourierist utopia of Raoul Vaneigem, René Viénet’s earthy situationist cinema, Gianfranco Sanguinetti’s pranking of the Italian ruling class, and Alice Becker-Ho’s account of the anonymous language of the Romany.