marc garrett
Since the beginning
Works in London United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

PORTFOLIO (4)
BIO
Marc Garrett is co-director and co-founder, with artist Ruth Catlow of the Internet arts collectives and communities – Furtherfield.org, Furthernoise.org, Netbehaviour.org, also co-founder and co-curator/director of the gallery space formerly known as 'HTTP Gallery' now called the Furtherfield Gallery in London (Finsbury Park), UK. Co-curating various contemporary Media Arts exhibitions, projects nationally and internationally. Co-editor of 'Artists Re:Thinking Games' with Ruth Catlow and Corrado Morgana 2010. Hosted Furtherfield's critically acclaimed weekly broadcast on UK's Resonance FM Radio, a series of hour long live interviews with people working at the edge of contemporary practices in art, technology & social change. Currently doing an Art history Phd at the University of London, Birkbeck College.

Net artist, media artist, curator, writer, street artist, activist, educationalist and musician. Emerging in the late 80′s from the streets exploring creativity via agit-art tactics. Using unofficial, experimental platforms such as the streets, pirate radio such as the locally popular ‘Savage Yet Tender’ alternative broadcasting 1980′s group, net broadcasts, BBS systems, performance, intervention, events, pamphlets, warehouses and gallery spaces. In the early nineties, was co-sysop (systems operator) with Heath Bunting on Cybercafe BBS with Irational.org.

Our mission is to co-create extraordinary art that connects with contemporary audiences providing innovative, engaging and inclusive digital and physical spaces for appreciating and participating in practices in art, technology and social change. As well as finding alternative ways around already dominating hegemonies, thus claiming for ourselves and our peer networks a culturally aware and critical dialogue beyond traditional hierarchical behaviours. Influenced by situationist theory, fluxus, free and open source culture, and processes of self-education and peer learning, in an art, activist and community context.
Discussions (1690) Opportunities (13) Events (175) Jobs (2)
DISCUSSION

It's a Man's Man's Man's World - Review: Sonic Acts day 1


It's a Man's Man's Man's World - Review: Sonic Acts day 1.

New Review by Nathan Jones.

The first day of the Sonic Acts festival featured some of the most prominent men in philosophy, electronic music and sound art today, including OOO practitioners Graham Harman and Tim Morton, M.E.S.H., Vessel Florian Hecker and Reza Negarestani. Nathan Jones attended this day for Furtherfield.

"Trans-gender theorist Jami Weinstein has compared the flocking behaviour of academics and artists around the concept of The Anthropocene, to the adoption by the Hipster of a given locale or fashion appendage. The creative flock, she suggests, can perform a gentrification of concept through uncritical adoption and ‘hyper-consumption’, just as it does of neighbourhoods or workwear. The Anthropocene is indeed the place to be seen, or the guise in which to dress the body of your work, this season. The term is proposed as a way of describing the explicit ‘age’ in which human kind, post-1945 (although possibly since the Industrial Revolution, or stretching right back to the advent of tool use), has come to define the geophysics of the entire earth."

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/reviews/its-mans-mans-mans-world-review-sonic-acts-day-1

DISCUSSION

Dark Days with Ellie Harrison


Dark Days with Ellie Harrison

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Caren Gilbert shares the experience of trying to find consensus on how we should approach life after the apocalype in the pop-up community of Ellie Harrison's "Dark Days" sleep-over at Glasgow's Gallery of Modern Art.

"Lately, I have noticed in myself a tendency to sign up for events which reveal little of what to expect beforehand. This leads to a heady mix of anticipation and mild terror. Dark Days, the brainchild of Ellie Harrison fitted that description, although I felt that at 16hrs long, it was a mere blip on my riskometer, compared to week-long excursions I’ve previously taken into the unknown. In short, I would be spending the night in Glasgow’s Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA), in a pop-up community of 99 strangers, contemplating how we might manage to live together (put up with each other) in a future where buildings might need to be used in ways which serve the needs of the population better…Count me in!"

http://bit.ly/1GYZrLb

DISCUSSION

Mechanisms of Exclusion: “We Are All Faceless Mobs Now, Dawg.”


Mechanisms of Exclusion: “We Are All Faceless Mobs Now, Dawg.”

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Mez Breeze examines the inner workings of our contemporary internet rage machine to identify its social and psychological causes.

http://t.co/y27ZuanOVl

"Today’s online spaces are communication minefields. When interacting in multiplayer games or social media niches, networks come drenched in reactivity bile. And although we might seem to bile-dilute, instead we intellectually saw at each other through a polite veneer. Here, civil discourse is label-trotted. Discourse bile may also erupt in balls-to-the-wall screaming matches. Such bouts involve trollbaiting, d0xxing, and Internet Rage Machine power-ups. Whatever the magnitude/form, online dialogues appear to be flooded with antagonistic commentary.

DISCUSSION

Tapestries? - Patrick Lichty Interviewed by Tilman Baumgärtel


Tapestries? - Patrick Lichty Interviewed by Tilman Baumgärtel

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http://t.co/Cqpag89Lo3

The American artist Patrick Lichty is best-known for his works with digital media: as part of the activist group RT Mark and as designer of digital animation movies for their follow-up The Yes Men, he has been recognized as a net artist with a political bend. He has been working with digital media since the 1980s, and has created works with video, for the Web and for Second Life.

At the moment, Lichty has a solo show “Artifacts” at DAM Galerie in Berlin (http://bit.ly/1DTNvt9).

However, the artist, who is teaching at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee and has recently published a book of theoretical essays on Networked Cultures (http://bit.ly/1aLdAB6), is not showing media works, but tapestries. Tapestries! What's going on? Tilman Baumgärtel finds out.

DISCUSSION

Painting with Data: A Conversation with Lev Manovich


Painting with Data: A Conversation with Lev Manovich

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By Randall Packer.

While big data has infiltrated our everyday lives, Lev Manovich and his collaborators have explored the data of everyday life as a window on social transformation. We discuss his latest work: The Exceptional and the Everyday: 144 Hours in Kiev, a portrait of political upheaval in the Ukraine constructed from thousands of Instagram photos taken over a six day period during the revolution in February of 2014.

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/interviews/painting-data-conversation-lev-manovich