marc garrett
Since the beginning
Works in London United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

PORTFOLIO (4)
BIO
Marc Garrett is co-director and co-founder, with artist Ruth Catlow of the Internet arts collectives and communities – Furtherfield.org, Furthernoise.org, Netbehaviour.org, also co-founder and co-curator/director of the gallery space formerly known as 'HTTP Gallery' now called the Furtherfield Gallery in London (Finsbury Park), UK. Co-curating various contemporary Media Arts exhibitions, projects nationally and internationally. Co-editor of 'Artists Re:Thinking Games' with Ruth Catlow and Corrado Morgana 2010. Hosted Furtherfield's critically acclaimed weekly broadcast on UK's Resonance FM Radio, a series of hour long live interviews with people working at the edge of contemporary practices in art, technology & social change. Currently doing an Art history Phd at the University of London, Birkbeck College.

Net artist, media artist, curator, writer, street artist, activist, educationalist and musician. Emerging in the late 80′s from the streets exploring creativity via agit-art tactics. Using unofficial, experimental platforms such as the streets, pirate radio such as the locally popular ‘Savage Yet Tender’ alternative broadcasting 1980′s group, net broadcasts, BBS systems, performance, intervention, events, pamphlets, warehouses and gallery spaces. In the early nineties, was co-sysop (systems operator) with Heath Bunting on Cybercafe BBS with Irational.org.

Our mission is to co-create extraordinary art that connects with contemporary audiences providing innovative, engaging and inclusive digital and physical spaces for appreciating and participating in practices in art, technology and social change. As well as finding alternative ways around already dominating hegemonies, thus claiming for ourselves and our peer networks a culturally aware and critical dialogue beyond traditional hierarchical behaviours. Influenced by situationist theory, fluxus, free and open source culture, and processes of self-education and peer learning, in an art, activist and community context.
Discussions (1673) Opportunities (12) Events (175) Jobs (2)
DISCUSSION

DISCUSSION

Study of The Dancing Rhinoceri of Bangladesh


Study of The Dancing Rhinoceri of Bangladesh

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Article by Yen Ooi

Yen reviews Dancing Rhinoceri of Bangladesh, an interactive poem by net artist Millie Niss, looking at the interface and reader experience, but also at the text itself, and the complexities of its reading, and at the source of its creation through technology. The Dancing Rhinoceri of Bangladesh, she says, is more than just a poem. As with all electronic literature, it requires more than just literacy to access, understand and appreciate. It is a piece of art, which carries in itself, cultural, historical, political and technological implications and meanings.

Millie Niss was known, first and foremost as a net artist. Her works tend to have interactive characteristics in them, with thought-provoking writing and the Dancing Rhinoceri of Bangladesh is exactly that, an interactive poem with a strong message.

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/reviews/study-dancing-rhinoceri-bangladesh

DISCUSSION

Glass houses, Roman numerals and shady worlds. Annet Dekker in conversation with Femke Herregraven.


Glass houses, Roman numerals and shady worlds. Annet Dekker in conversation with Femke Herregraven.

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‘About 50% of global trade is channelled through tax havens and 83 of the 100 largest multinationals are based in the Netherlands for fiscal reasons. The flow of money seeks the path of least resistance – but where exactly do those paths lie today?’

Annet Dekker interviews graphic designer Femke Herregraven about her latest online game Taxodus, a game about offshore tax avoidance. Taxodus is an accessible way to discover how you can avoid paying taxes, and if you can’t get away with it completely, how you can make sure you pay the lowest possible amount. "My primary intention, says Femke, is to make these flows of money visible and question them, because once it’s out in the open people can decide for themselves if this is our idea of a sustainable economy."

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/interviews/glass-houses-roman-numerals-and-shady-worlds-annet-dekker-conversation-femke-her

DISCUSSION

'Training for a Better World' by Annie Abrahams.


'Training for a Better World' by Annie Abrahams.

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Michael Szpakowski takes us through Annie Abrahams’ show at the Centre Régional d'Art Contemporain Languedoc-Roussillon in Sète. Annie's work, he says, "has no message, is not confined to any one medium, collaborates in multiple ways, borrows, steals (and gives) and presents us with a set of marvellous and mysterious objects which afford us a spectrum of entirely new pathways to the world, to seeing it, talking and thinking about it".

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/reviews/training-better-world-annie-abrahams

DISCUSSION

Community Memory through Appropriated Media: An Interview with Eugenio Tisselli.


Community Memory through Appropriated Media: An Interview with Eugenio Tisselli.

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Interview by Marc Garrett.

I met Eugenio Tisselli in Edinburgh at the Remediating the Social conference in November 2012. Eugenio gave a presentation on the project Sauti ya wakulima, "The voice of the farmers". A collaborative knowledge base created by farmers from the Chambezi region of the Bagamoyo District in Tanzania, and "by gathering audiovisual evidence of their practices they use smartphones to publish images and voice recordings on the Internet", documenting and sharing their daily practices.

I was struck by his sensitivity to the social contexts and political questions around this type of project engagement. This interview explores the challenges we all face in connecting to a deeper understanding of what technology can succeed in doing beyond the usual hype of the 'New' and its entwined consumerist diversions. Not only does the conversation highlight how communities can work together in collaborating with technology on their own terms. But, it also discusses the artists' role in the age of climate change and the economic crisis, locally and globally.

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/interviews/community-memory-through-appropriated-media-interview-eugenio-tisselli