marc garrett
Since the beginning
Works in London United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

PORTFOLIO (4)
BIO
Marc Garrett is co-director and co-founder, with artist Ruth Catlow of the Internet arts collectives and communities – Furtherfield.org, Furthernoise.org, Netbehaviour.org, also co-founder and co-curator/director of the gallery space formerly known as 'HTTP Gallery' now called the Furtherfield Gallery in London (Finsbury Park), UK. Co-curating various contemporary Media Arts exhibitions, projects nationally and internationally. Co-editor of 'Artists Re:Thinking Games' with Ruth Catlow and Corrado Morgana 2010. Hosted Furtherfield's critically acclaimed weekly broadcast on UK's Resonance FM Radio, a series of hour long live interviews with people working at the edge of contemporary practices in art, technology & social change. Currently doing an Art history Phd at the University of London, Birkbeck College.

Net artist, media artist, curator, writer, street artist, activist, educationalist and musician. Emerging in the late 80′s from the streets exploring creativity via agit-art tactics. Using unofficial, experimental platforms such as the streets, pirate radio such as the locally popular ‘Savage Yet Tender’ alternative broadcasting 1980′s group, net broadcasts, BBS systems, performance, intervention, events, pamphlets, warehouses and gallery spaces. In the early nineties, was co-sysop (systems operator) with Heath Bunting on Cybercafe BBS with Irational.org.

Our mission is to co-create extraordinary art that connects with contemporary audiences providing innovative, engaging and inclusive digital and physical spaces for appreciating and participating in practices in art, technology and social change. As well as finding alternative ways around already dominating hegemonies, thus claiming for ourselves and our peer networks a culturally aware and critical dialogue beyond traditional hierarchical behaviours. Influenced by situationist theory, fluxus, free and open source culture, and processes of self-education and peer learning, in an art, activist and community context.
Discussions (1673) Opportunities (12) Events (175) Jobs (2)
DISCUSSION

Disrupting The Gaze. Part 1: Art Intervention and the Tate Gallery.


Disrupting The Gaze. Part 1: Art Intervention and the Tate Gallery.

The Goldsmiths Radical Media Forum is a lecture series.
Thursday, February 21, 2013, 5:30 (New Academic Building 102)

Marc Garrett will present the first section of his two part paper 'Disrupting The Gaze'. Part one 'Art Intervention and the Tate Gallery'.

https://sites.google.com/site/mcradicalmedia/

We live in a world riddled with contradictions and confusing signals. Our histories are assessed, judged and introduced as fact yet there are so many bits missing. We accept what is given through sound bite forms of mediation and end up using misinformation as our cultural foundations, and then we build on these ‘acquired’ assumptions as our ‘imagined’ guidelines. This critique studies how contemporary artists are challenging these defaults through their connected enactments and critical inquiries of the existing conditions. It highlights a continual dialogue involving a historical struggle between what is condoned as legitimate art and knowledge, and what is not. It looks at a complexity, embedded in our culture and its class divisions in Britain. And draws upon struggles going as far back as the enlightenment, the industrial revolution, colonialism and slavery, to present day concerns with neoliberalism and its dominance. The Tate gallery is used as a reference point and a site of focus for these various historical and contemporary, political and societal conflicts.

The artists’ and art groups featured, such as Graham Harwood, Platform, Liberate Tate, IOCOSE, Tamiko Thiel, and Mark Wallinger; has each delivered a particular (unofficial and official) mode of art intervention at the Tate Gallery. Whether these artistic activities concern economic, ecological, historical, political or hierarchical conditions, they all connect in different ways. They meet, not through style or as part of a field of practice, but as contemporary artistic practitioners exploring their own states of agency in a world where our ‘public’ interfaces are as much a necessary place of creative engagement, as is the already accepted physical ‘inner’ sanctum of the gallery space. However, their work has become equally significant (perhaps even more) than, the mainstream art establishment’s franchised celebrities.

DISCUSSION

Foundland: Critical Stories.


Foundland: Critical Stories.

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http://www.furtherfield.org/features/interviews/foundland-critical-stories

Annet Dekker interviews Foundland, Ghalia Elsrakbi (SY) and Lauren Alexander (SA). A multi-disciplinary art and design practice based in Amsterdam. With backgrounds in graphic design, art and writing Foundland’s approach focuses on research based, critical responses to current issues. While moving around in advertising, printed matter, the Internet, and off line art spaces they dig up interesting stories about Disney, SpongeBob and defected soldiers.

DISCUSSION

Towards a Free/ Libre/ Open/ Source/ University


Towards a Free/ Libre/ Open/ Source/ University

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Image from Fab Lab (fabrication laboratory), small-scale workshop offering digital fabrication. London.

By Paula Roush.

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/articles/towards-free-libre-open-source-university

Paula Roush explores the growing interest in free and Open Source practices in art. This report maps out these shifting relationships in contemporary models of education both online and offline. Recent expansion of so-called ‘free culture’ has contributed to placing the debate over authorship, ownership and licensing of the artwork at the centre of artistic production. Crucially, the transformation of art in the age of global culture and the consequent move from autonomous art objects into cultural artworks and services, has resulted in the emergence of new visible tendencies.

Born in Lisbon, Paula Roush lives in London where she is an artist and lecturer at the London South Bank University and University of Westminster. More about Paula Roush - http://www.msdm.org.uk/

You can find the original article on 'Collaboration and Freedom – The World of Free and Open Source Art'.
http://p2pfoundation.net/World_of_Free_and_Open_Source_Art

This article is part of the Furtherfield collection commissioned (http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/our-priorities-2011-15/digital-innovation-and-creative-media/digital-resources/collaboration-and-freedom/) by Arts Council England for Thinking Digital, in 2011.

DISCUSSION

CyPosium: An online symposium on cyberformance. (Reviewed)


CyPosium: An online symposium on cyberformance. (Reviewed)

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By Rob Myers.

CyPosium was an online event in October 2012 dedicated to the history of online performance. It recovered previously lost history, brought online performers old and new into conversation, and assembled its audience into an ad hoc community.

"We all perform on the Internet. The social media profiles that we are contractually obliged to give our real names to are just as much performances as our World Of Warcraft or Minecraft avatars. Yet these impromptu performances of our socialised and fantasy selves lack the literary quality of drama. Not drama in the sense of a Usenet or Tumblr flamewar, but in the sense of theatre."

http://www.furtherfield.org/features/reviews/cyposium-online-symposium-cyberformance

DISCUSSION

DIWO: Do It With Others – No Ecology without Social Ecology.


DIWO: Do It With Others – No Ecology without Social Ecology.

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http://www.furtherfield.org/features/articles/diwo-do-it-others-%E2%80%93-no-ecology-without-social-ecology

By Marc Garrett, Ruth Catlow.

The acceleration of technological development in contemporary society has a direct impact on our everyday lives as our behaviours and relationships are modified via our interactions with digital technology. As artists, we have adapted to the complexities of contemporary information and communication systems, initiating different forms of creative, network production. At the same time we live with and respond to concerns about anthropogenic climate change and the economic crisis. As we explore the possibilities of creative agency that digital networks and social media offer, we need to ask ourselves about the role of artists in the larger conversation. What part do we play in the evolving techno-consumerist landscape which is shown to play on our desire for intimacy and community while actually isolating us from each other. (Turkle 2011) Commercial interests control our channels of communication through their interfaces, infrastructures and contracts. As Geert Lovink says 'We see social media further accelerating the McLifestyle, while at the same time presenting itself as a channel to relieve the tension piling up in our comfort prisons.' (2012: 44)

Many contemporary artists who take the networks of the digital information age as their medium, work directly with the hardware, algorithms and databases of digital networks themselves and the systems of power that engage them. Inspired by network metaphors and processes, they also craft new forms of intervention, collaboration, participation and interaction (between human and other living beings, systems and machines) in the development of the meaning and aesthetics of their work. This develops in them a sensitivity or alertness to the diverse, world-forming properties of the art-tech imaginary: material, social and political. By sharing their processes and tools with artists, and audiences alike they hack and reclaim the contexts in which culture is created.

This essay draws on programmes initiated by Furtherfield, an online community, co-founded by the authors in 1997. Furtherfield also runs a public gallery and social space in the heart of Finsbury Park, North London. The authors are both artists and curators who have worked with others in networks since the mid 90s, as the Internet developed as a public space you could publish to; a platform for creation, distribution, remix, critique and resistance.

Here we outline two Furtherfield programmes in order to reflect on the ways in which collaborative networked practices are especially suited to engage these questions. Firstly the DIWO (Do It With Others) series (since 2007) of Email Art and co-curation projects that explored how de-centralised, co-creation processes in digital networks could (at once) facilitate artistic collaboration and disrupt dominant and constricting art-world systems. Secondly the Media Art Ecologies programme (since 2009) which, in the context of economic and environmental collapse, sets out to contribute to the construction of alternative infrastructures and visions of prosperity. We aim to show how collaboration and the distribution of creative capital was modeled through DIWO and underpinned the development of a series of projects, exhibitions and interventions that explore what form an ecological art might take in the network age.

Featuring: A Abrahams, Kate Rich, IOCOSE, Helen Varley Jamieson, Paula, Feral Trade Cafe, make-shift, Do It With Others (DIWO) E-Mail Art, If not you not me.

First published in Remediating the Social 2012. Editor: Simon Biggs University of Edinburgh. Pages 69-74
http://elmcip.net/critical-writing/remediating-social

An ebook version of Remediating the Social is freely downloadable.
http://elmcip.net/sites/default/files/files/attachments/criticalwriting/remediating_the_social_full.pdf