Lee Wells
Since 2002
Works in United States of America

BIO
Lee Wells is an artist, exhibition organizer and consultant currently living and working New York. His artwork primarily questions systems of power and control and has been exhibited internationally including the 51 st La Biennale Di Venezia, Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinatti and the Museo d'arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Trento e Rovereto. He is a co-founder and director of IFAC-arts, http://www.ifac-arts.org, an alternative exhibition and installation program for artists and curators.
His artwork, projects and exhibitions have been written about by various national and international art and news publications to include: The New York Times, Art Newspaper, The Washington Post, Art in America, and Art Net.

Wells is currently a curator at large and Cinema-Scope director for Scope Art Fairs http://www.scope-art.com. In January 2006, he co-founded the video art community research portal and traveling installation [PAM] http://PerpetualArtMachine.com, with the artists Raphaele Shirley, Chris Borkowski and Aaron Miller.
Wells has been participating on the Rhizome since 1998.

John Cage Trust Moves To Bard


The John Cage Trust is moving to Bard College. "The Trust, which oversees Cage's works and performances, is to be called the John Cage Trust at Bard College effective as of its move in the spring. Previously, the Cage Trust had been housed in the Archive Building in the West Village in Manhattan; after 9/11 Kuhn and the Trust moved to Phoenix, Arizona."
Listen : John Cage - in love with another sound
documentary film (1992)
director: miroslav sebestik

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EUROPEAN MEDIA ART FESTIVAL


Image

EUROPEAN MEDIA ART FESTIVAL
festival: April 25 - 29 2007
exhibition: April 25 - May 20 2007

fon: ++49 -(0)541-21658
fax: ++49 -(0)541-28327
web: www.emaf.de

postal address:
Lohstrasse 45a
D - 49074 Osnabruck
Germany

20 Years of the European Media Art Festival - the forum for Expanded Media in Europe

The meeting point for audiences and guests from home and abroad. Around 250 new works of media art, including world premieres, will be presented. The festival shows film as a contemporary work of art in cinemas and exhibitions, both performed and using multimedia.

//Exhibition
The exhibition "Final Cut" directs our view to the relationship between media art and cinema. From 25 April to 20 May an artistic look at the dream machine "cinema" will be given at the Kunsthalle Dominikanerkirche. International artists will demonstrate their fascination with cinema, but will also question the values, codes and patterns behind the films. Works will be presented by artists such as Paul McCarthy, Alex McQuilkin, Mischa Kuball, Klaus vom Bruch, Candice Breitz, Mark Lewis, Christoph Girardet, Bjorn Melhus, Peter Tscherkassky, Christoph Draeger, Clemens von Wedemeyer and Pierre Huyghe. There will also be plenty of opportunity to participate in talks with the artists and attend lectures on the subject. The exhibition is funded by the Federal Cultural Foundation.

// Anniversary
A review of media art will be given by our special guests, the director of the ZKM, Peter Weibel, Lynn Hershman, Birgit Hein of the fur Bildende Kunste Braunschweig and Malcolm LeGrice, who will be showing their personal selection of films.

// Cinema
Around 180 current experimental shorts, feature-length films and videos have been selected from a total of roughly 2000 works submitted from around the world. They range from narrative approaches to documentary/analytical views of war events and environmental problems. Visually walking the borderline ...

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Web 2.0: An Explanation


Michael Wesch, a cultural anthropology professor at Kansas State University, has created a four minute video that captures what Web 2.0 and social media is all about.


Web20TheMachineisUsingUs -

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Visualizing the Blogosphere


TwinglyIt's old news (to some), but I finally got around to playing with the Twingly blog visualizer (via 3PointD). For those who can't tell from the picture to the right or from the video at the bottom of this post, Twingly is a downloadable application that displays a rotating 3D globe that includes plotted locations of blog posts as they occur in real-time. Basically, the longer you let it run, the more you'll see where blog activity is occurring around the globe. Statistics for each country are available in the big ring circumnavigating the globe. The application is available for download here and you can even turn it into your screensaver.

Google has something similar to this at their headquarters that plots geographic search volumes on a giant globe, also, although that isn't available for public consumption. Overall, the direct marketing applications of something like this are probably pretty low, but it may provide for interestingly analysis and it's certainly an excellent graphical representation of the blogosphere.

Another great example of this is the 3DLiveStats.com application (the link appears to be down at the moment), which allows you to plot data from any external database on a giant 3D globe.



Twinglyscreensavervisualizingtheblogosphere -

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“DIGITAL DIVING: A CUT AND PASTE UPDATE” : PANEL DISCUSSION


THE BFA FINE ARTS AND ART HISTORY
DEPARTMENTS AT SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS (SVA)
PRESENT DIGITAL DIVING: A CUT AND PASTE
UPDATE A PANEL DISCUSSION



Tuesday, February 27, 7pm
School of Visual Arts
209 East 23 Street
3rd-floor Amphitheater
Free and open to the public


The BFA Fine Arts and Art History Departments at School of Visual Arts (SVA) present, Digital Diving: A Cut and Paste Update, a discussion of digital culture and its impact on the visual arts and information technologies. Moderated by Suzanne Anker, chair of the BFA Fine Arts Department at SVA, the program will explore the uses and abuses of such technologies as they effect knowledge acquisition and its manipulation, new media models of the visual and altered configurations of communities. The panelists are Lauren Cornell, Joseph Nechvatal, Judith Solodkin, Bruce Wands and McKenzie Wark. The event takes place Tuesday, February 27, 7pm at School of Visual Arts, 209 East 23rd Street, New York City. Admission is free. For more information, call 212.592.2010. read more

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Discussions (758) Opportunities (13) Events (21) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: Are They Really?


Marc
Come on we know all of these places are like private clubs with secret
meetings and special boards.
If you want to get your link on there site get to know someone thats there
at the Walker.
Go into 007 mode and make it happen.

Cheers
Lee

syc

DISCUSSION

Re: Are They Really?


Marc
Come on we know all of these places are like private clubs with secret
meetings and special boards.
If you want to get your link on there site get to know someone thats there
at the Walker.
Go into 007 mode and make it happen.

syc

DISCUSSION

Re: I have a theory =


This dino issue has got me thinking.
What is the connection between dinosaurs/reptiles to humans.
Our skin sheds.
Are humans in effect dinosaurs. I know if We (humans) dont do something soon
the same thing that happened to them will happen to us.

on 8/12/02 9:59 PM, Pet Name at muserna@muserna.org wrote:

> on 8/12/02 8:36 AM, wowm wowm@wowm.org ecrit :
>
>
>> i have a theory that bands whose native language is not english
>> think that when they sing on english they can sing about anything
>> even if their music is awful
>> http://www.epitonic.com/artists/embellish.html
>
> I don't like where this topic is going, being a big fan of Japanese Pop and
> all, I have to admit they do say some strange things, but I asked a friend
> to translate some lyrics originally sung in Japanese and they told me that
> It was nonsense and rather silly in Japanese too.
>
> BTW - is cheese popular in Jp?
>
>
> -muserna
>
>
> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>
> B A T H R O O M
>
> by Judy and Mary
> Lyrics: YUKI / Music: Onda Yoshihito
> http://www.geocities.com/judyandmarylyrics/orange_sunshine.html#cheese
> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>
>
> Your eyes are beautiful reflected in soda water
> My lips tremble unconsciously, your cheeks blush
>
> A couple like melted cheese who know nothing of love
> While walking in the street, unknowingly laughing
>
> Let's meet at our regular spot
> Waiting for the blue sky, we'll share a kiss
> My breast like ice meets you
> And becomes hot
>
> A couple like melted cheese who know nothing of love
> Wearing rose coloured glasses I want to have it all
>
> Let's be, just the two of us, and never split apart
> Let's eat cheese pizza under a perfect blue sky
>
> A couple like melted cheese who know nothing of love
> While walking in the street, unknowingly laughing
>
> Let's be, just the two of us, and never split apart
> Even if something sad happens, we'll go right on by
>
> In my depressing mood, from afar I hear your voice
> "Don't forget, I'll always be by your side"
>
> Let's be, just the two of us, and never split apart
> Let's eat cheese pizza under a perfect blue sky
>
> Let's be, just the two of us...
> Let's be, just the two of us...
>
>
> + distance equals rate times time
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php

DISCUSSION

Re: I have a theory =


And King is for sure linked to the aliens living in the crater on the North
Pole. Some people may discount this as being a crock of sh--. But at least I
have a theory on the matter and I think it has some good points. Just sit
back and let your mind drift.

Lee

on 8/12/02 12:24 AM, marc.garrett at marc.garrett@furtherfield.org wrote:

> I also think that my theory and your link to Martin Luther King also has
> profound implications.
>
> marc:_0
>
>
>>> I have a theory =
>>>
>>> That all dinasours were thin at one end - fat in the middle - And then
> thin
>>> at the other end.
>>>
>>> This is my theory and I am sticking to it.
>>>
>>> Unless of course someone else proves otherwise...
>>
>> marc,
>>
>> i think your theory has profound implications. whereas at one level,
>> one may say that the pterodactyl does not comply to this mold.
>> perhaps our constructed image of the pterodactyl is what is
>> fundamentally flawed in the first place. These re-constructions are
>> based on theoretical evidence from fossil remains of skeletal
>> structures only. Suspect at best. Imagine the bird/lizard with the
>> same bones, but redistributed lumps of fat.
>>
>> One clue is your reference to Martin Luther King, who was also kind
>> of small at the ends but larger in the middle.
>>
>> Judson
>>
>>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>
>> PLASMA STUDII
>> http://plasmastudii.org
>> 223 E 10th Street
>> PMB 130
>> New York, NY 10003
>>
>>
>
>
> + vs. every art school ever...
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php3

DISCUSSION

Re: The Artist speaking of his Brushes etc and other stuff


There are no rules, anything goes.

on 8/10/02 7:54 PM, Jess Loseby at jess@rssgallery.com wrote:

> hello,
> just thought i'd stop by and have my usual moan...
> stop me if if you've heard it before..er, like the last 20 time we debated
> the rules..:-)
> i tend to think the rules as a loose general guide-line or an ideal can be
> good thing for some (although i also kind of think one point of being an
> artist is to break any possible rule that's going but that's by the by..) I
> also think that if you can follow them and produce the kind of work that
> eryk is at the moment then its got to be a good thing for some artists
> BUT
>
> why do we always have to slid so quickly into "flash is corporate,
> crappy, obvious crap" discussion..
> firstly, if you have a programming background, lovely! - enjoy the coding
> guys, there's little doubt about the freedom it gives you. But flash makes
> the net accessible to the many artists who haven't got the
> time/money/inclination to spend god knows how long learning another
> language when they they have a pretty user-friendly one that means
> they can play with artistic ideas rather than programming ones straight
> away.
>
> Secondly, when I was creating textiles long ago, there used to be these
> boring unending debates about useing 'natural dyes' against ready
> mixed ones. The argument being that ready mixed dyes were for plebs
> who could be arsed to go out there and LEARN the craft, who weren't
> REAL artists because they didn't know the DEEP personal satisfaction
> that came from gathering rosehips at dawn and boiling them down for
> 80 hours to produce the EXACT shade of pink for their ART. Same
> goes with this debate. Flash is seen as the cheep, commercial, cop-out
> for the lazy guys. YAWN. it's just a kind of pride. Coding takes longer,
> takes longer to learn, is clever... so it HAS to be better,yes?
>
> well, perhaps if it wasn't about art maybe. But whether an artwork
> 'works' as a piece has little to do with the time the artist has taken to
> learn, where they learned, or how they did it. You can spend 6 months
> coding a piece and it can still be crap. You can 6 months of a flash
> piece and it can be crap. You can manipulate an image in 20 minutes
> and it can be bloody brilliant. Because artworks have much more about
> them than the tools...it 'works' as a piece of art because of one or more
> of a mix of aesthetics, form, content, style, colour (or lack of), tone ("),
> agenda, politics, play, text, texture, sound, emotion, reaction(s),
> observation, rebellion etc etc etc (delete or add to taste)
>
> perhaps its the old art and craft divide again. Craft has always be about
> the 'skill' of the craftsman, art (arguably) about the 'object'. A craftsman
> wouldn't use flash and artist might...? Perhaps it is the same way a
> craftsman would only use the best wood to make a beautiful table
> whereas an artist would make the table out of teabags, matchsticks,
> lego blocks..just about anything if it said and did what the artist wanted
> it to.
>
> Macromedia Is shite. I use it all the time and I hate them. I put up with it
> with it because it frees me from my fear of code (alien language) and
> lets me explore. I'm working with video at the moment. I just couldn't
> have done with it what I'm doing in flash without another 3 years, rather
> more money and a new brain (mine melts at anything above basic
> scripting)
> 'nuff said. I've bored even myself.
> jess. o
> /^ rssgallery.com
> ][
>
>
>
> + vs. every art school ever...
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php3