Kris Paulsen
Since 2004
Works in Columbus, Ohio United States of America

BIO
Assistant Professor of Film, Video & New Media in the Department of History of Art and Program in Film Studies at The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

http://www.kpaulsen.com/
http://history-of-art.osu.edu/people/paulsen
Discussions (0) Opportunities (4) Events (1) Jobs (0)
OPPORTUNITY

CFP - Media-N -- Art & Networks


Deadline:
Fri Nov 15, 2013 00:00

Media-N CFP for Spring Edition 2014
Media-N, Journal of the New Media Caucus, is pleased to announce a Call for Papers for spring 2014 on the theme of “Art and Networks.”

“Art & Networks: Revealing, Critiquing and Composing Global Infrastructures” Edition One – Hardware
deadline for proposals: 11/15/13

Dr. Meredith Hoy & Dr. Kris Paulsen (Edition One – Hardware)
Media-N Editor-in-Chief -- Pat Badani
………………………………………….
DESCRIPTION
“Art & Networks: Revealing, Critiquing and Composing Global Infrastructures” - Part 1, Hardware

Our telecommunications infrastructures are composed of multiple layers, and serve as grounds for conflict at multiple scales. To address networked infrastructure through art or scholarship is to make visible both the material, physical supports of everyday telecommunication, as well as its informational processes, its necessary protocols for organizing knowledge, sensation, and labor. As in all infrastructures and sociotechnical systems, these two layers – the physical and the informational, the hardware and the software – are interdependent, and result from simultaneous, sometimes even conflicting, interests at work in their construction. For 2014, across two consecutive editions, Media-N will explore how artists engage, visualize, study, and critique these processes of formation.
The Spring edition will focus on the physical structures of these channels, and the networks they construct; the Fall edition will address the knowledge protocols and epistemes necessary to networked information, and the archives that emerge. Both will explore the role of visualization in knowing our shared networks.
……………………………………….
Edition One / Hardware
Co-Guest Editors:
Dr. Meredith Hoy, University of Massachusetts, Boston
Dr. Kris Paulsen, The Ohio State University

Fiberoptic cables gird the globe; they span pylons, burrow underground, and snake across ocean floors to connect individual users in private homes. Satellites circle the earth, instantaneously bouncing signals through outer space. “Clouds” now wirelessly store and transmit data to dispersed users across a multiplicity of devices; they make information accessible to users in virtually any networked location. Data may be abstract, and “immaterial,” but physical hardware necessarily facilitates the flow of information. Given that the scale of these networks exceeds the scope of human vision by establishing connections across the globe and beyond, into extraterrestrial space and deep below the ocean and ground, the question emerges of how to make visible the kinds of connectivity provided by telecommunications hardware.
This edition of Media-N will explore how networks, as well as the data that travels through them, become visible and meaningful through artistic practices ranging from data visualization and sonification, to mapping, satellite video and photography, telerobots, and interactive cable systems. The technologies in question reconfigure distance and proximity, presence and absence, space and time. We seek to turn attention toward the physical hardware that subtends our mediated interactions, and to explore contemporary attempts to picture connectivity. The issue will bring together theorists, artists, and historians to analyze how particular forms of visuality and logics of connection result from different, technologically enabled approaches to global communications technologies. Proposed papers might take up the specifically “ecological turn” of contemporary media studies, which assesses the world in terms of systems, or conduct media archaeological investigations of the development of specific technologies and practices, or trace critical histories of networked art, among other possibilities.
TIMELINE for Submission for Edition One / Hardware:
November 15, 2013: Deadline for reception of abstracts/proposals.
December 15, 2013: Notification of acceptance.
February 15, 2014: Deadline for reception of final papers/artworks.

ABSTRACT GUIDELINES
Please send your submission proposal with the following information, by email to:
Meredith.Hoy@UMB.edu AND Paulsen.20@OSU.edu
with ‘Media-N Submission’ and your name(s) in the subject line.

Include your Email(s), Proposal Title, 300-500 word Proposal Description, up to 3 page Resume, and your Title/Affiliation (the institution/organization you work with ­ if applicable, or independent scholar/practitioner.)


OPPORTUNITY

Call for Artists -- Journal of Short Film (DVD)


Deadline:
Sat Jul 14, 2012 23:59

The Journal of Short Film is seeking submissions for future issues.

About The Journal of Short Film:
• a quarterly DVD journal containing 60-90 minutes of independent short film per volume
• peer-reviewed by filmmakers and film scholars
• inclusive of all genres of film, video, animation, and new media work
• sold at a low cost—$10/vol., $36/subscription both domestically and internationally
• non-corporate and ad-free
• open and free submission process

Deadline:
Submissions for Volume 28 are due [Friday July 14th]
Submit films of less than 20 minutes to:

The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program
150 Hagerty Hall
1775 College Road
Columbus, OH 43210, USA

The Submission must contain your:
Film
Name
Postal Address
Email address
Telephone Number

If you need your work returned, please include an addressed postage paid envelope.

All submissions are carefully considered. It may take up to 2 months after the deadline to respond. Please, do not submit films via email.

Acceptable submission formats:
DVDs are preferred, though VHS tapes will be accepted on a need basis.
DVDs must be Region 1, NTSC. Please, no PAL tapes or discs.

Rights and Clearances
The filmmaker maintains the rights to the film. The publishing right granted to the JSF is a non-exclusive, one-time serial right.
Films must have ALL clearances available in writing. Copies may be requested later.

Please circulate this announcement.
We look forward to your submissions.



OPPORTUNITY

Call For Artists' Projects: Generative & Algorithmic Art, Leonardo Electronic Almanac


Deadline:
Sat Sep 15, 2012 23:59

Generative & Algorithmic Art, Leonardo Electronic Almanac

Senior editors for this issue: Lanfranco Aceti, Meredith Hoy, and Kris Paulsen.

In his essay “What is Generative Art? Complexity Theory as a Context for Art Theory,” Philip Galanter provocatively suggests that “generative art may be as old as art itself.” [1] The programmatic, mathematical patterns that appear in Islamic tile work, Tibetan mandalas, and textiles from around the globe (and particularly from Jacquard’s early 19th century punch card loom) all exhibit the qualities of generative art: they are produced by preset instructions or procedural rules that dictate the forms and structures they might take. Defining a generative mode of production in its most general terms, Galanter writes, “Generative art refers to any art practice where the artist uses a system, such as a set of natural language rules, a computer program, a machine, or other procedural invention, which is set into motion with some degree of autonomy contributing to or resulting in a completed work of art.” [2] Depending on the technology implemented by the artist and the material form of the finished artwork, there can exist wide variations in the degree of the system’s autonomy, the impact of artistic intention and influence, and the complexity or predictability of the system used to generate the artwork. A technology can be as simple as a written set of natural language instructions resulting in a wall drawing in graphite or as complex as a string of computationally executable code that manifests in a spectacular array of screen-based graphics. The degree of artistic intervention in the final product effects the extent to which a system can be defined as functioning autonomously; in a true generative system, the rules of the program are produced by the artist, set into motion, and then left to develop, often in ways that could not be predicted by the artist due to the incursion of random variables.

This special issue of Leonardo Electronic Almanac seeks to investigate the long history of generative and algorithmic art, from the historical predecessors mentioned above, to contemporary computational artworks. We invite proposals for articles examining generative and algorithmic art practices from the ancient world to the present day, and artists’ projects and pictorial essays engaging with these procedures and structures. Submissions might investigate issues of authorial control, predictability and unpredictability, chance and “aleatoric” methods of art making, or might propose theoretical and philosophical explorations of the concepts of hardware and software, the materiality of generative systems, video feedback as a generative system, the relationship between generative art and cinematic practices, or the historically expansive and ever expanding range of technologies capable of executing generative systems.

[1] Philip Galanter, “What is Generative Art? Complexity Theory as a Context for Art Theory,” in Generative Art Proceedings, 2003. http://www.generativeart.com/
[2] Ibid.

Please send proposals to: info@leoalmanac.org

a) Subject heading: Generative and Algorithmic Art
b) Deadline for submission of full article for consideration: 15.09.2012
c) 2 images at 72 dpi resolution no larger than 700pixels width for artists
d) Links to previous work, videos or personal sites

Our publication formats allow for full-color throughout and we encourage rich pictorial content where relevant and possible. Note however that all material submitted must be copyright cleared (or due diligence must be evidenced). For online publication a wide variety of media content may be considered (animation, mp3, flash, java, etc…)

• For scholarly papers please submit the final paper ready for peer review. Your contribution will be reviewed by at least two members of the LEA board and revisions may be requested subject to review.
• For themed and pictorial essays please submit an abstract or outline for editorial consideration and further discussion.
• Please keep your news, announcements and hyperlinks brief and focused – include contact details and a link to an external site where relevant. We reserve the right to sub-edit your submissions in order to comply with LEA policies and formats. Where material is time-sensitive please include both embargo and expiry dates.
• In all cases specify special system considerations where these are necessary (platform, codecs, plug-ins, etc…)

For further information or image submission contact: Ozden.Sahin@leoalmanac.org

We look forward to hearing from you!


OPPORTUNITY

CFP: Generative & Algorithmic Art, Leonardo Electronic Almanac


Deadline:
Sat Sep 15, 2012 23:59

Generative & Algorithmic Art, Leonardo Electronic Almanac

Senior editors for this issue: Lanfranco Aceti, Meredith Hoy, and Kris Paulsen.

In his essay “What is Generative Art? Complexity Theory as a Context for Art Theory,” Philip Galanter provocatively suggests that “generative art may be as old as art itself.” [1] The programmatic, mathematical patterns that appear in Islamic tile work, Tibetan mandalas, and textiles from around the globe (and particularly from Jacquard’s early 19th century punch card loom) all exhibit the qualities of generative art: they are produced by preset instructions or procedural rules that dictate the forms and structures they might take. Defining a generative mode of production in its most general terms, Galanter writes, “Generative art refers to any art practice where the artist uses a system, such as a set of natural language rules, a computer program, a machine, or other procedural invention, which is set into motion with some degree of autonomy contributing to or resulting in a completed work of art.” [2] Depending on the technology implemented by the artist and the material form of the finished artwork, there can exist wide variations in the degree of the system’s autonomy, the impact of artistic intention and influence, and the complexity or predictability of the system used to generate the artwork. A technology can be as simple as a written set of natural language instructions resulting in a wall drawing in graphite or as complex as a string of computationally executable code that manifests in a spectacular array of screen-based graphics. The degree of artistic intervention in the final product effects the extent to which a system can be defined as functioning autonomously; in a true generative system, the rules of the program are produced by the artist, set into motion, and then left to develop, often in ways that could not be predicted by the artist due to the incursion of random variables.

This special issue of Leonardo Electronic Almanac seeks to investigate the long history of generative and algorithmic art, from the historical predecessors mentioned above, to contemporary computational artworks. We invite proposals for articles examining generative and algorithmic art practices from the ancient world to the present day, and artists’ projects and pictorial essays engaging with these procedures and structures. Submissions might investigate issues of authorial control, predictability and unpredictability, chance and “aleatoric” methods of art making, or might propose theoretical and philosophical explorations of the concepts of hardware and software, the materiality of generative systems, video feedback as a generative system, the relationship between generative art and cinematic practices, or the historically expansive and ever expanding range of technologies capable of executing generative systems.

[1] Philip Galanter, “What is Generative Art? Complexity Theory as a Context for Art Theory,” in Generative Art Proceedings, 2003. http://www.generativeart.com/
[2] Ibid.

Please send proposals to: info@leoalmanac.org

a) Subject heading: Generative and Algorithmic Art
b) Deadline for submission of full article for consideration: 15.09.2012
c) 2 images at 72 dpi resolution no larger than 700pixels width for artists
d) Links to previous work, videos or personal sites

Our publication formats allow for full-color throughout and we encourage rich pictorial content where relevant and possible. Note however that all material submitted must be copyright cleared (or due diligence must be evidenced). For online publication a wide variety of media content may be considered (animation, mp3, flash, java, etc…)

• For scholarly papers please submit the final paper ready for peer review. Your contribution will be reviewed by at least two members of the LEA board and revisions may be requested subject to review.
• For themed and pictorial essays please submit an abstract or outline for editorial consideration and further discussion.
• Please keep your news, announcements and hyperlinks brief and focused – include contact details and a link to an external site where relevant. We reserve the right to sub-edit your submissions in order to comply with LEA policies and formats. Where material is time-sensitive please include both embargo and expiry dates.
• In all cases specify special system considerations where these are necessary (platform, codecs, plug-ins, etc…)

For further information or image submission contact: Ozden.Sahin@leoalmanac.org

We look forward to hearing from you!


EVENT

Takeovers & Makeovers: Artistic Appropriation, Fair Use, and Copyright in the Digital Age


Dates:
Sat Nov 08, 2008 00:00 - Sat Nov 01, 2008

Location:
United States of America

On November 7 & 8, 2008, the University of California, Berkeley will hold a symposium on appropriation rights in the digital era entitled:
Takeovers & Makeovers: Artistic Appropriation, Fair Use, and Copyright in the Digital Age.

This event will bring together artists, lawyers, art historians, and representatives from the information technology community to discuss the changing field of appropriation art in the wake of the emergence of new digital media technologies that have radically altered access to and manipulation of information.

Takeovers & Makeovers:
Artistic Appropriation, Fair Use, and Copyright in the Digital Age
November 7th and 8th, 2008
University of California, Berkeley
Berkeley Art Museum
2621 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704

Full program at:
http://bcnm.berkeley.edu/takeovers/

Participants include:
David Evans (Professor of Art History, Arts Institute at Bournemouth)
Fred Von Lohmann (Senior Staff Attorney, The Electronic Frontier Foundation)
Michael Mandiberg (Artist, New York)
Jason Schultz (Associate Director, Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic)
MTAA [M. River & T. Whild] (Artists, New York)
Tom McDonough (Professor of Art History, SUNY Binghamton)
Virginia Rutledge (Special Counsel, Creative Commons, Chair, Art Law Committee, New York City Bar Association)
Abigail de Kosnik (Professor of New Media and Performance Studies, UC Berkeley)
Larisa Mann (Jurisprudence Scholar, Boalt School of Law)
Anne M. Wagner (Professor of Art History, UC Berkeley)
Candice Breitz (Artist, Professor of Fine Art, Braunschweig University of Art)
Rick Prelinger (Co-Founder, The Prelinger Library & Board President, The Internet Archive)
Richard Rinehart (Digital Media Director and Adjunct Curator, Berkeley Art Museum)
The Billboard Liberation Front (Media Activists, San Francsico)
Peter Krapp, (Professor, Film & Media Studies, School of Humanities UC Irvine)
Marisa Olson, (Artist, Curator at Large, Rhizome; Ph.D. Candidate, Rhetoric/Film Studies, UC Berkeley)

Appropriation - the act of taking private property and making it over as one's own - is a crucially important, yet increasingly fraught concept in contemporary art and culture. For art historians the term designates and often critically engaged art practice in which artists glean materials from cultural artifacts and transform, parody, remix, and recontextualize them. Yet the term has a markedly different status in the legal discourse, in which 'appropriation' is virtually indistinguishable from its shadow, 'misappropriation.' Indeed, under the law any act of appropriation can be argued to be an infringement of copyright or trademark, while even murkier strategies of quotation, reference, or influence can be deemed plagiarism. How do restrictions on appropriative acts effect creativity and limit artistic production and attendant forms of social, political, and cultural critique? What might be the ramifications of constant extensions of exclusive rights for the public domain? Is the property of large media corporations more or less valuable than artistic reinterpretations of their materials? Could appropriation be the price one pays for being culturally relevant? Is appropriation an honor or an insult? What can be learned from art historical instances of appropriation for contemporary practice, and vice versa? How might the terrain in which the legal and art discourses over appropriation meet be mapped productively? Of note here are the many legal battles fought over fair use in the music industry, while the art world has largely stayed out of the fray, leading to a number of myths about fair use in the fine arts. Does the knowledge, for example, that artists such as Andy Warhol and Robert Rauschenberg licensed certain images they reproduced as artworks alter the reception, interpretation, and relevance of their work? Has the fact that many artists have chosen to settle their copyright debates behind closed doors rather than in the courtroom hurt the cause of fair use?

The intersection of copyright and creativity creates a complex web of relationships and paradoxes: artists who freely circulate their work rely on licensing to support themselves, and those who appropriate copyrighted material often go on to copyright their own work and limit its circulation. The digital era has ushered in further complications, as digital technologies and user-generated content sites facilitate the easy appropriation and distribution of source material, in part or wholesale, but severely complicate the legal issues surrounding these works of art. Creative Commons, for example, has developed a new form of copyright that allows individuals to opt for less than exclusive rights on their creations, so that works can be freely transformed and disseminated. In addition to addressing the history, present, and possible future of appropriation, conference participants will take up its relationship to current debates over digital copyright law, fair use, and mass distribution in on-line environments.

Conference Organizers:
Erica Levin (Ph.D. Candidate, Film Studies, UC Berkeley)
Tara McDowell (Ph.D. Candidate, Art History, UC Berkeley)
Kris Paulsen (Ph.D. Candidate, Rhetoric, UC Berkeley)

contact: takeovermakeovers@gmail.com