Kate Armstrong
Since 2002
Works in United States of America

PORTFOLIO (4)
BIO
Kate Armstrong is a writer and new media artist who has lived and worked in Canada, France, Japan, Scotland and the United States. Her work has taken a variety of forms including short films, essays, net.art, performative network events, psychogeography and installation. Her theoretical work centres on themes of immanence and repetition. Her first book, Crisis & Repetition: Essays on Art and Culture, was published in 2002. Her artwork has been exhibited internationally. More information: http://katearmstrong.com

Discussions (5) Opportunities (1) Events (31) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Turbulence Commission:


Hi Jim & Pall
Thanks for the comments about Grafik Dynamo. Yes, I wrote the texts. They are pulled from a flat file and randomly fed into the piece using javascript. There are two documents, one for the thought and speech bubbles (upper texts) and one for the expository notes (lower texts). So there is a level of organization that governs the way the fragments are distributed. Regarding the fragments themselves: I wanted to use some of the formal structures you find in comics, such as "meanwhile...", lots of exclamation points, and speech patterns like "ack!" etc. I was initially drawn to using references to science fiction and 1940s spy fiction. I was loving the brilliant innocence of both comics and that literature, where everything happens in either London or Damascus, people carry around suitcases of gems, and scientists become deranged by their magnificent powers. As I was working with these themes I found myself adding references to things that seemed more current, like evangelicals, lobbyists and apocalypse, and started to pull in other concerns, not usually associated with comics or hard-boiled crime novels, such as existential freedom & metaphysical structures like extra-temporal essence. These things started to feed back on each other so that all of a sudden I was discovering implications that philosophical states were being influenced by these mysterious machines, or that powerful non-specific figures were motivated by the desire to have outre religious experiences. So that's how the material evolved in the beginning. When it started to run against the influx of images I was happy to see that these associations became even more complex.
Kate
______________
Kate Armstrong
http://katearmstrong.com

Pall Thayer wrote:

> I also really like the Roy Lichtenstein reference and would also like
> to
> hear a little more about the texts, whether they are gathered or
> written
> specifically for the work.
>
> Pall
>
> Jim Andrews wrote:
> > That's quite interesting, Kate and Michael. Could you say something
> about
> > the texts; there's the upper and lower texts...how were they
> composed--I
> > presume Kate wrote or assembled the texts? Also, the visuals plus
> the
> > thought bubbles are much better visually than I would have expected
> with
> > something dynamic textually.
> >
> > Gotta say I prefer this to standard comics.
> >
> > ja
> > February 15, 2005
> > Turbulence Commission: "Grafik Dynamo" by Kate Armstrong and
> Michael
> > Tippett
> > http://turbulence.org/works/dynamo/index.html
> >
> > "Grafik Dynamo" is a net art work that loads live images from
> blogs and
> > news sources on the web into a live action comic strip. The work is
> > currently using a feed from LiveJournal. The images are accompanied
> by
> > narrative fragments that are dynamically loaded into speech and
> thought
> > bubbles and randomly displayed. Animating the comic strip using
> dynamic web
> > content opens up the genre in a new way: together, the images and
> narrative
> > serve to create a strange, dislocated notion of sense and
> expectation in the
> > reader, as they are sometimes at odds with each other, sometimes
> perfectly
> > in sync, and always moving and changing. The work takes an
> experimental
> > approach to open ended narrative, positing a new hybrid between the
> flow of
> > data animating the work and the formal parameter that comprises its
> > structure.
> >
>
> --
> _______________________________
> Pall Thayer
> artist/teacher
> http://www.this.is/pallit
> http://pallit.lhi.is/panse
>
> Lorna
> http://www.this.is/lorna
> _______________________________

DISCUSSION

Re: Turbulence Commission:


Hi Jim & Pall
Thanks for the comments about Grafik Dynamo. Yes, I wrote the texts. They are pulled from a flat file and randomly fed into the piece using javascript. There are two documents, one for the thought and speech bubbles (upper texts) and one for the expository notes (lower texts). So there is a level of organization that governs the way the fragments are distributed. Regarding the fragments themselves: I wanted to use some of the formal structures you find in comics, such as "meanwhile...", lots of exclamation points, and speech patterns like "ack!" etc. I was initially drawn to using references to science fiction and 1940s spy fiction. I was loving the brilliant innocence of both comics and that literature, where everything happens in either London or Damascus, people carry around suitcases of gems, and scientists become deranged by their magnificent powers. As I was working with these themes I found myself adding references to things that seemed more current, like evangelicals, lobbyists and apocalypse, and started to pull in other concerns, not usually associated with comics or hard-boiled crime novels, such as existential freedom & metaphysical structures like extra-temporal essence. These things started to feed back on each other so that all of a sudden I was discovering implications that philosophical states were being influenced by these mysterious machines, or that powerful non-specific figures were motivated by the desire to have outre religious experiences. So that's how the material evolved in the beginning. When it started to run against the influx of images I was happy to see that these associations became even more complex.
Kate

Pall Thayer wrote:

> I also really like the Roy Lichtenstein reference and would also like
> to hear a little more about the texts, whether they are gathered or
> written specifically for the work.
>
> Pall
>
> Jim Andrews wrote:
> > That's quite interesting, Kate and Michael. Could you say something
> about the texts; there's the upper and lower texts...how were they
> composed--I presume Kate wrote or assembled the texts? Also, the visuals plus the thought bubbles are much better visually than I would have expected with something dynamic textually.
> >
> > Gotta say I prefer this to standard comics.
> >
> > ja

EVENT

Upgrade 2.0//with Kate Armstrong & Michael Tippett


Dates:
Tue Feb 15, 2005 00:00 - Tue Feb 08, 2005

The Upgrade 2.0// Vancouver is an informal monthly meeting of new media artists and curators held at the Western Front at 303 East 8th Avenue in Vancouver, Canada. Now in its second season, the Upgrade series is a forum for the presentation of new work and is meant to foster dialogue and create opportunities for collaboration within the media art community. At each meeting artists present work in progress and participate in a discussion. For more information visit http://www.katearmstrong.com/upgrade/vancouver or contact Kate Armstrong, Curator, at kate@katearmstrong.com .
........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Join us Tuesday, February 15th at 730 pm for a talk by Kate Armstrong and Michael Tippett. Kate Armstrong and Michael Tippett will launch their new net art collaboration Grafik Dynamo, a 2004-2005 commission for Turbulence.

Grafik Dynamo is a net art work that loads live images from blogs and news sources on the web into a live action comic strip. The images are accompanied by narrative fragments that are dynamically loaded into speech and thought bubbles and randomly displayed. Animating the comic strip using dynamic web content opens up the genre in a new way: Together, the images and narrative serve to create a strange, dislocated notion of sense and expectation in the reader, as they are sometimes at odds with each other, sometimes perfectly in sync, and always moving and changing. The work takes an experimental approach to open ended narrative, positing a new hybrid between the flow of data animating the work and the formal perameter that comprises its structure.

Kate Armstrong
Kate Armstrong is a new media artist and writer who has lived and worked in Canada, France, Japan, Scotland, and the United States. Her work focuses on the creation of experimental narrative forms, particularly works in which poetics are inserted within the functional framework of computer programs, and performative pieces in which computer functionality is merged with physical space. She has worked with a variety of forms including short films, theatre, essays, net art, performative network events, psychogeography and installation.

Armstrong was artist in residence at the Techlab at the Surrey Art Gallery and received a New Media Production Grant from the Canada Council in 2003. She is a recipient of a 2004-2005 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., for Turbulence, which was made possible with funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Her artwork has been exhibited internationally. Armstrong curates Upgrade 2.0 at the Western Front in conjunction with Upgrade in New York, and runs the media arts organization Special Airplane. She has written for P.S 1/MoMA, the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art, TrAce, Year Zero One, and The Thing, as well as for catalogue publications. Her first book, Crisis & Repetition: Essays on Art and Culture, was published in 2002.

Michael Tippett
Michael Tippett has a decade of experience creating and managing technology businesses. With expertise in design, namespace, distributed & mobile media and wireless technology, Tippett's media background is in pioneering new forms of networked content. His newest venture, NowPublic.com, uses emerging technologies like camera phones, digital cameras, blogging tools and RSS standards to change the way news is created and distributed. NowPublic.com lets people build their own news. Bloggers can use their blogs to automatically dispatch photographers to the site of a news story anywhere in the world. At the same time, photographers can distribute, manage and sell their media. News readers can see what members are reporting on and see how this is reflected elsewhere on the web and in the media. Content that passes through NowPublic is systematically organized and accessible into multiple and specific RSS feeds and is fed back into the blogosphere. NowPublic can be thought of as "reality news" - providing a hub for citizen reporting and for viewing world events though the prism of an alternate, distributed, real time media.

URLS:
http://www.nowpublic.com
http://www.turbulence.org
http://www.katearmstrong.com

Tuesday, February 15th at 730 pm
Western Front
303 East 8th Avenue
Vancouver, Canada

See you there!

Kate Armstrong
........................................................................
http://katearmstrong.com
http://specialairplane.org
Upgrade Vancouver: http://www.katearmstrong.com/upgrade/vancouver/index.html
Upgrade NYC: http://www.treasurecrumbs.com/theupgrade/
Upgrade Montreal: http://theupgrade.sat.qc.ca/


EVENT

Upgrade 2.0//with tobias c. van Veen


Dates:
Tue Dec 14, 2004 00:00 - Tue Dec 07, 2004

The Upgrade 2.0// Vancouver is an informal monthly meeting of new media artists and curators held at the Western Front at 303 East 8th Avenue in Vancouver, Canada. Now in its second season, the Upgrade series is a forum for the presentation of new work and is meant to foster dialogue and create opportunities for collaboration within the media art community. At each meeting artists present work in progress and participate in a discussion. For more information visit http://www.katearmstrong.com/upgrade/vancouver or contact Kate Armstrong, Curator, at kate@katearmstrong.com .
........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Join us Tuesday, December 14th at 730 pm for a talk by tobias c. van Veen.

At Upgrade, tobias will consider his involvement in tactical media and technoculture past, present and future, including a brief overview of the work of , his net-art project Document 9-1-1, his work with random chance operations and scripts for turntable and laptop performance, as well as his recent involvement with sonic psychogeography.

tobias c. van Veen
tobias c. van Veen is a renegade theorist & pirate, techno-turntablist & writer based in Montreal. He is Concept Engineer at SAT [sat.qc.ca] and Project Leader of Sonic Scene in the Mobile Digital Commons Network [MDCN.ca]. Since 1993 he has internationally directed over fifty independent conceptual and sound-art events, online interventions and radio broadcasts, working with STEIM, Mutek, the New Forms Festival, the Banff Centre, the Video-In, Upgrade!, the Vancouver New Music Society, and Hexagram. His work has appeared in CTheory, EBR, Bad Subjects, Leonardo, FUSE (contributing editor), e/i (columnist), the Wire, HorizonZero and through Autonomedia, among others. His writing has been translated into Spanish, Lithuanian and French and his art disseminated through Rhizome.org, Javamuseum.org, Kunstradio, Burn.fm, CiTR, a handful of contemporary art museums (Denver, Barcelona, etc.), No Type's BricoLodge and the and/OAR labels. From 1993-2000 he was Direktor of the sonic performance Collective (shrumtribe.com) on the West Coast and co-founder of technoWest.org and thisistheonlyart.com.

tobias hosts The Upgrade! Montreal, a new affiliate of Upgrade 2.0//Vancouver, and is director of the [3p] project. Djing for over 10 years, tobias' style is marked by the cut-up and non-linear mixing styles of future techno and house: Detroit, minimal, dub, glitch, and acid. Run that through the regional markers of context (Montreal, Vancouver, Berlin) and the application of concept (masochism, atmosphere, shock). His Dj sets have appeared on BetaLounge.com, Burn.fm, NoType.com and Techno.ca, and his skills have graced events worldwide, from Amsterdam to Barcelona, Montreal to NYC. An article discussing his experimental work with turntable scripts appeared in Leonardo Music Journal 13. Tobias is a Ph.D candidate in Philosophy & Communication at McGill and New School, NYC.

URL: http://www.quadrantcrossing.org/blog/
Upgrade Montreal: http://theupgrade.sat.qc.ca/

Tuesday, December 14th at 730 pm
Western Front
303 East 8th Avenue
Vancouver, Canada

See you there!

Kate Armstrong
........................................................................
http://katearmstrong.com
http://specialairplane.org
Upgrade Vancouver: http://www.katearmstrong.com/upgrade/vancouver/index.html
Upgrade NYC: http://www.treasurecrumbs.com/theupgrade/
Upgrade Montreal: http://theupgrade.sat.qc.ca/


EVENT

Upgrade 2.0//with Jim Andrews and Lionel Kearns


Dates:
Tue Nov 16, 2004 00:00 - Mon Nov 08, 2004

Join us Tuesday, November 16th at 730 pm for a talk by Jim Andrews with Lionel Kearns.

Jim Andrews will present work from On Lionel Kearns, a binary meditation in Shockwave on the work of Vancouver poet Lionel Kearns. Kearns is one of very few poets who have been thinking about digital poetics and the synthesis implied by electronic media since the early sixties. Andrews works with texts, visual poems, and animated poetry videos by Kearns that were written/produced from the early sixties through the mid eighties. On Lionel Kearns is a tribute to Kearns's polyartistic synthesis of arts, media, language and the binary, and is an attempt to extend Kearns's experimental poetics into the contemporary landscape of software art. For instance, the work contains a great deal of 'imaging Lingo' that takes up Kearns's concern with reference, identity, infinity, fractals, and loops toward the creation of interactive visual poetry. He also updates such pieces as Kearns's "Participatory Poem" toward the creation of a piece where readers over the Internet can literally participate in the poem.

Jim Andrews
Jim Andrews is a poet-programmer-audio guy-critic-mathematician. He has been publishing Vispo since 1995: He is the founder of the webartery list and currently co-moderates the -empyre- list, both of which focus on digital art. He is also the founder of the Mocambopo poetry reading series in Victoria Canada, and produced the Fine Lines and ?Frame? literary/experimental radio shows in the eighties that were heard across Canada on campus/community stations each week for six years. He currently lives in Victoria, BC.

Lionel Kearns
During his active days as a Canadian poet (1960-1986) Lionel Kearns experimented with a range of forms and formats, and was one of the first writers to embrace the new technology. Some of his earlier work, and his ideas on the nature and potential of poetic form, foreshadowed the contemporary arena of web-based digital poetry.

URL: http://www.vispo.com

Tuesday, November 16th at 730 pm
Western Front
303 East 8th Avenue
Vancouver, Canada

See you there!

Kate Armstrong
______
http://katearmstrong.com
http://specialairplane.org
Upgrade 2.0//Vancouver: http://www.katearmstrong.com/upgrade/vancouver/index.html
Upgrade NYC: http://www.treasurecrumbs.com/theupgrade/
Upgrade Montreal: http://theupgrade.sat.qc.ca/